Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide rim seen on this vessel allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid, and served as a palette for the liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1363867
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
This superb Greco-Roman bronze piece is an applique that is in the form of a theater mask, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-early 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.3 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide, by .8 inches in relief. This piece has a flat back with a small raised iron knob, and may have been the terminal end of a vessel handle, or may have been fitted into armor such as a cuirass. The latter scenario is more likely, as the raised knob resembles the remnants of an iron pin which would define this piece as a fitting, or a decorative attachment. This piece has a very well-defined face with sharp eyes, and detailed individual hair with hanging curls. The hanging curls are very detailed, and are very realistic in their design. In addition, this piece has a finely sculpted mouth and rounded chin, which is an artistic style that resembles the earlier Greek facing head coinage from Rhodes. The overall image greatly resembles a Greco-Roman theater mask, or it may also be, and double as a protective Medusa. Whatever the case, this piece is a very fine example, with extremely fine artistic style, very high relief, and a beautiful even dark green patina with minute spotty red highlights. This piece is also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
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This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1290942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1 inch wide, is ring size 6.5, and was made for a young man or woman. This ring has an oval shaped hoop, and this shape provided for a wide face that looks very large when worn on the finger. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today as well. This piece has sections of original gold gilt seen over the bronze, and this piece has a brilliant translucent orange carnelian stone that is firmly attached to the bronze bezel. The beautiful carnelian stone was never reattached to the ring, and it is firmly in place in it's original setting. The brilliant orange carnelian stone also has a carved image of a seated animal, possibly a dog or a fox. This animal is seen on a ground line, and has raised ears and a long curled tail. The brilliant orange carnelian stone is also highly polished, has an oval shape, a flat bottom, and is clear save for a small black inclusion that is deep within the stone. This piece was also used as a personal seal/signet ring, and makes a sharp impression. The condition of this piece is superb, and is intact with no repair/restoration, and has original gold gilt seen on the inner and outer surfaces of the bronze bezel. Overall, this attractive piece is in better condition than most examples of its type, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Inv. #P33-091-031915. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1339702
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze armor plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 2.2 inches wide at the top, and the high relief of this piece is about .25 inches. This striking piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some spotty light to dark green mineralization seen mostly on the backside of the piece. In addition, this piece has some spotty gilt "tinning" seen in various sections of the front side of the piece. This piece was likely fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and this cuirass likely had duplicate pieces that were also fitted into the cuirass on the other side of the chest. This piece may also have been interwoven into the fabric of the cuirass, and there is a square attachment slot seen at the bottom of the piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and depicts a very muscular standing nude Mars holding a shield on the ground with his left hand, and in the right, he is holding and leaning on a spear. He is also seen wearing a helmet, and has a cloak draped over his arms. The muscular Roman war god Mars is also seen standing over a sea-panther with a coiled tail, and the entire scene is framed by a dotted border. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most plaques are fragmentary, and are not complete and intact as the exceptional piece offered here. In addition, the majority of Roman armor was constructed with several bronze pieces which attached to a leather and/or fabric cuirass, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This piece is also in mint to superb condition, and has no repair/restoration, cracks, or chips. This type of piece is also analogous to another example that depicts the nude Roman war god Mars standing over a sea-panther, and is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 22, no. 87. (See the attached photo of this piece which is a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipemt", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted into a custom Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1384803
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality and beautiful Roman glass flask dates circa 4th century A.D., and is approximately 5.4 inches high. This piece is made from a pale blue-green glass, with a spherical body, concave base, and an extended neck that widens up to the rim. There is also an attractive trailing decoration that spirals around a third of the neck, and has developed a striking iridescence. This trailing neck thread decoration was created to provide a "grip" on the neck, and perhaps doubled as a "stopper" for a wax seal around the top opening of the vessel. This piece also has sections of a multi-iridescent patina with hues of peach, lavender, blue, and green. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal. (For the type see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, no. 403. Classified as: "Galilee Fabric".) Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Superior Galleries: "The International Diamond Corporation Auction", Los Angeles, CA., June 8, 1993. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1311165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This cute piece is a Roman bronze seated Silenus that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, and is a complete intact piece that has no repair/restoration. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and was cast as one piece. This piece shows a nude drunken and drinking Silenus seated on a rock, and he is holding a kantharos in his left hand, and his right hand is raised with an open palm and raised thumb. This pose with the open palm is also thought to have been a popular gesture used by actors in the Greek and Roman theater. (For a description of these various theatrical poses and gestures see: "The History of the Greek and Roman Theater", by Margarete Bieber, Princeton University Press, 1939.) The Silenus seen here has the typical bald head, pot belly, short legs, and had human and horse attributes. The eyes and facial features are very well detailed, and this piece is a nice example of this mythical creature who was the companion and tutor of Dionysus. This piece also has a round insert below the piece, and this is an indication that this piece may have been part of a group bronze sculpture made from several figurines. This piece also has a small flat section on top of the head, and this may have been designed to support another object and/or figurine as well. A nice Roman bronze with a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa late 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1368965
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This exceptional and rare mint state (FDC) Roman gold aureus was minted in Rome, and dates circa 145 A.D. This coin is graded FDC/FDC (mint state), is 7.32 g., and is approximately 20mm. The coin also has perfect centering, extremely high relief, and a great deal of eye appeal. This coin features on the obverse, a young Faustina Junior facing left, with FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL around. She is seen wearing detailed drapery, with layers of hair tucked up into a bun with dotted pearls. Her portrait is simply magnificent, and her face conveys a serene expression. The reverse features a walking dove facing right on a ground line, with CONCORDIA around. This magnificent coin was also struck under her father Antoninus Pius, and commemorated the April 145 A.D. marriage of Annia Galeria Faustina Junior to her material cousin Marcus Aurelius. At the time of the engagement, Antoninus also formally adopted Marcus Aurelius as his heir. The dove on the reverse represents harmony for a stable marriage, as the dove is known to be monogamous throughout its lifetime. A magnificent coin that is likely the finest known for its type. References: RIC III 503b; Strack 507; Calico 2044c; Biaggi 922; BMCRE 1090. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 730. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1357220
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This detailed and interesting piece is a late Roman/Byzantine bronze bracelet that dates circa 4th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches in diameter, by 1.2 inches high. The opening on the back side is approximately .9 inches wide, and the terminal ends have rounded edges. This beautiful piece is also intact, and has no repair and/or restoration. This piece has six engraved box designs, and within each box is a "stylized floral" pattern that is also a conventional art design for the period. The "stylized floral" patterns are often seen in other art pieces for the period, and were sometimes used to portray the "holy cross" with "four pointed rays". There is one box in the center of the piece that has "four pointed rays", while the others have six to eight. This symbol was used in the same context as the holy "fish" symbol, which was used to signal and mark one's faith. This piece also has a beautiful light to dark green patina, and has some spotty light blue and red highlights. The engraving is very fine and detailed, and is a superb example for the period. This piece does not flex, although the metal is relatively thin, and really should not be worn today. This piece sits on a custom metal stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #761896
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This exceptional piece is a Roman marbled bottle that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches high and is in mint quality condition. This piece is a dark green/blue color, has some calcite deposits on the inner surface, and some spotty black mineral deposits on the outer surface. This piece was made by blending glass rods into the piece, and this process created the "marbled" composition of the vessel. This piece is also much heavier than a Roman glass blown example that is thin walled. For an analogous example see Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 90. ( $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $6875.00 realized.) A rare piece that is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Contemporary item #817549
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price as ordered. Kindle version available at: http://www.amazon.com!
If you are a neophyte or an advanced collector of ancient art, "Into the Antiquities Trade" by Kevin R. Cheek is a valuable resource and a "must read" for every collector. This book defines and explains the political situation relative to the trade, as seen in the chapter "Who's Who", and clarifies the "pro" and "con" positions that the three different camps take regading the trade. This book also offers the collector a refreshing viewpoint that "there is no better preserver of ancient art than the private collector". This book also has a chapter "Some Things to Look For" that is useful for many collectors, especially when they are considering a purchase of ancient art. In addition, this chapter has information relative to the testing of ancient works of art for authenticity, and the detection of forgeries. This chapter also helps to explain market pricing, and the use of descriptions/terms such as "repair", "as found", and "restoration". The Kindle version can be found at: www.amazon.com! This book is also offered in both soft and hard cover, and can be ordered online at: http://www.amazon.com. This book can also be ordered at your local bookstore, including additional bookstores found through Google. ISBN Hardcover: 1-4134-3194-1. ISBN Softcover: 1-4134-3193-3. You may also order a signed copy direct from the author, Kevin R. Cheek, by calling 305-785-5315 or 303-321-7351, or email: apoloniaco@aol.com.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1351962
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful Greco-Roman marble bust is a portrait of a young god that dates to the late Hellenistic period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, and was once part of a statuette. This piece portrays a young god wearing a Greek Hellenistic "Attic" type helmet, and has a slightly upturned head, along with the head slightly tilted to the left that is also seen bending away form the angled neck. In addition, the eyes are slightly upturned which is a god-like attribute relative to Greek Hellenistic art. The eyes also being deeply inset also draws the viewer to the fleshy lips that are also added features of early Hellenistic Greek period art that was established by Lysippos, who produced striking portraits of Alexander the Great. (For the artistic style related to the portraiture of Alexander the Great that is attributed to Lysippos, see the attached photo from the "Search of Alexander" exhibit catalog, 1980, no. 25. This photo is of a marble bust of Alexander the Great now seen in the Pella Museum, Greece, and was executed in the 2nd century B.C. as a portrait that represented Alexander as a romantic divinity in the late Hellenistic period.) The attractive marble bust offered here also follows this earlier artistic sculptural style, and is very analogous in artistic style to the Pella example noted above. The piece offered here also likely represents the Greek and Roman war gods Ares and Mars, but the likeness seen here of this young warrior god also represents many known portraits of Alexander the Great, and in effect, this piece could have represented and doubled both as a god and Alexander. (For the portrait type see: A. Stewart, "Faces of Power, Alexander's Image and Hellenistic Politics".) This superb piece has some minor losses to the nose and to the lower chin, otherwise it is a complete example. This piece also has some spotty root marking, and a beautiful light brown patina over a bright white Parian type marble. This piece is an attractive example, and is an excellent representation of late Hellenistic period Greek art which also has exceptional artistic style. This exceptional piece is also mounted on a steel pin along with a custom Plexiglas display base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and dates to the Late Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd century B.C.- 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This weight also conforms to seven (7) Greek Macedonian tetradrachms (Alexander the Great) with a weight norm of 17.36 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive piece a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: