Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this complete piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This solid piece can also be easily mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece as it was done in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", Dec. 2004, no. 148. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This mint quality and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. The facial features of this appealing piece have fine detail, and also have a rather haunting and mysterious look. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378327
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This intact piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, is an intact example, and is a large example for the type. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, and has an attractive light green glaze. There is also an attached suspension hoop seen on the lower backside of the piece, and this piece was likely worn by an individual as a "protector" type amulet. The appealing bust of Ptah offered here also appears to be bald and/or is seen wearing a skull cap, and has deeply molded facial features that convey a slight smile with a serene expression. Ptah was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the ancient Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsmen. The piece seen here was not only likely worn as an amulet, but it was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This piece is in superb condition, has a nice even glaze, and is slightly bigger than most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384943
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience amulet is a facing panther head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.2 inches wide from ear to ear, by .4 inches thick, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This intact piece is also a complete example, and is in superb condition, save for some minute stress cracks on the front face, and a small area of glass loss on the lower left back side. This piece has a light green glaze, a flat back, and has a molded and detailed panther head on the front side. A hole runs through the center from top to bottom, and there are two additional mounting holes seen on each side of the center hole at the top of the piece. (The piece offered here is very analogous in artistic style to the carved facing panther head seen on the basalt statue of Anen, who served as an astronomer priest under Amenhotep III, and is now seen in the Turin Egyptian Museum, Italy. See attached photos.) The panther head is a regal symbol, and attached with the panther skin robe with stars, together represented the attributes of an astronomer. Egyptian regal princes were trained in astronomy so that they could predict the rising and falling of the Nile. The piece offered here likely was part of a regal necklace, is one of the rarest Egyptian amulet types, and is not often seen on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand that is included. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1381237
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact Romano-Egyptian terracotta fish that dates to the Roman Period, circa 30 B.C.-324 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece was made with a dark red-tan clay, and was mold made from two halves. This attractive piece also some thick gray-white deposits, which was also made from it's original white gesso that coated the entire piece. This piece has a curved body that creates movement for the viewer, and there is an open mouth, a small vent hole under the body, and detailed fins. This piece was also likely a votive object that provided sustenance for the departed in the after-life, and this type of piece is also relatively scarce on the market. This piece also likely depicts a Nile perch, which was a popular fish in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378231
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This piece is an Egyptian wooden mummy mask that dates to the Late Period, circa 700-30 B.C. This wooden piece is approximately 8.3 inches high, by 5.3 inches wide, and is a solid example. This pleasing "two-part" piece has a nose attached to the main body of the piece with two wooden dowels, and there are six additional dowels that attached the mask to the coffin lid. Five of these dowels are still in place, and in addition, there is a single dowel seen below the chin that was used to attach the mask to an extended wooden beard. The eyes and eye brows were created with angular cuts, in addition to the upper wig. The face also was applied with a thick white gesso, and thick amounts of it can be seen in various sections of the face. This esoteric face also has a slight smile, and has a great deal of eye appeal. The backside of the mask is flat, as it was attached to the coffin lid. This piece is a superb example with it's sectional dowel construction, and likely was made for a young man. This attractive piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Collection of Swanhild Castle, Brooklyn, New York, circa 1960's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338257
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This piece is an Egyptian necklace that is made of 84 individual beads and amulets that date circa 1070-712 B.C., Third Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 19 inches long, and has an added modern 18k gold clasp that makes this piece very wearable. The majority of the beads and amulets are mold made with a light blue glaze, and are faience type beads that have nice minute detail. The smaller beads likely represent small floral seeds, and there are two (2) closed floral amulets, three (3) grape cluster amulets, three (3) closed fist amulets, two (2) small carved white bone Horus Falcon bead amulets, and one (1) central light purple molded lapis lazuli phallic amulet that is a scarce example. These amulets are not only "protector type", but they are also "fertility type" amulets that promote fertility and the cycle of life. The ancient Egyptians always wore and offered amulets to a deity, because he or she believed that it would magically bestow a particular form of protective power. The necklace offered here is made from elements of beads and amulets that were also worn in antiquity, and/or were votive. For an explanation of all the elements and amulets seen in this attractive necklace see; "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. All of the elements and amulets are intact in superb condition, and have no repair and/or restoration. This necklace also has nice eye appeal, has detailed features, and can easily be seen from a distance. This piece also has a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1182929
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This extremely rare piece is an Egypto-Minoan terracotta jar that dates circa 2nd Millennium B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has some spotty light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of the piece. In addition, there are some minute root marks and fibers that are seen within some earthen deposits that are seen mostly on the stem base of the piece. This piece has a smooth inner surface, and on the outer surface, there are panels of incised lotus leaves that are seen running around the vessel from top to bottom. There are also eight punched holes evenly spaced around the vessel, which served as holes which likely strained liquid from inside the vessel, and this left a heavier mixture of material in the bottom half of the vessel. There is also an applied strap handle that is seen on one side of the piece, and the upper lip of this vessel also has an overhang on the inside, and this allowed one to easily pour and strain more liquid from this piece. This type of vessel may have been used in the production of a beverage such as beer, which required the straining of fermented water. The stem base of this piece is also analogous to both Egyptian and Minoan vessels that were produced circa 1800-1500 B.C. (See "Minoan and Mycenaean Art" by Reynold Higgins, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1971, pp. 38-40, figs. 30,31,32, 74 and 75. See attached photos.) This piece is an extremely rare vessel which also has an Egyptian motif in the form of the incised herringbone lotus leaf design. Ex: International Diamond Corp. Collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1975-1986. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1986-2011. Ex: Superior Galleries, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1359731
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze slashing sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This remarkable piece is approximately 21.4 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide at the point where the blade meets the shank of the weapon. This piece was hand forged into one piece from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This powerful weapon also has a blade that slightly graduates in width from the shank to the blunt end, and this blade section of the weapon is slightly curved. The straight rectangle shaped "extended shaft" is also very durable, and is approximately .5 inches wide at the shank, by .25 inches thick. This weapon's "extended shaft" also slightly graduates in size, mostly with the width, from the shank to the end of the handle. The cutting edge of the blade is also only on one side, as the blunt end is flat, along with the top side of the blade. Overall, this weapon is very finely made for the period, and has subtle dimensions of construction which makes it a very special and specialized work of ancient arms. This weapon was designed to slash through an enemy with one sweeping motion, and an extended "wooden shaft handle" would have allowed this weapon to be held with one or two hands. This design also allowed this weapon to likely be able to penetrate heavy armor such as a helmet or a breastplate, as the "extended shaft" attached to an extended "wooden shaft handle" would allow one to generate a tremendous amount of force. This weapon may also have been designed for use from a chariot or horseback, as the owner would be able to slash in a downwards motion, which would have generated even more force than a horizontal slash. This weapon may also be of a type that was used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with some red highlights, and some spotty light to dark green mineralization. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and has an ever so slight bend at the shank which may indicate that this piece was in battle. This weapon is extremely rare, is a highly specialized work of ancient arms, and is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,800.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large and rare piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This pleasing piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C., and is approximately .75 inches high. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, who was a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsman. This piece had a suspension hoop at the backside, and was worn as a "protector" type amulet. The piece offered here has a thick dark green glaze, and has a detailed face with a serene smile. Ptah is also seen wearing a skull cap, although he appears to be bald. This superb conditioned bust is complete, save for the missing left ear, and has a realistic and better facial expression that most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: