Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1366079
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb piece is a Greek Mycenaean bronze dagger that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1190 B.C. This complete example is approximately 4.9 inches long, by 1.3 inches wide at the lower tang shoulder, and has no repair/restoration. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute and spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is also classified as being the "Cruciform Type, Variant A", and has a flat blade without a midrib, slightly beveled edges, and an elliptical cross section. There is also a rounded lower tang shoulder, and the blade gradually moves down to a point. The design of the flat blade without a midrib, also allowed for an area on the blade that provided for the design of inlayed scenes that were made of precious materials such as gold and silver. Daggers such as the example offered here are scarce to rare, as most weapons with this design are much larger short swords. This piece also has two pin support holes, and one pin is still seen inserted into the piece. Many of these examples were also excavated at Mycenae, and the piece offered here was made during the height of Mycenaean expansion. A nice complete piece not often seen on the market. (For the type see "The Greek Age of Bronze", at www.salimbeti.com/micenei/weapons1.htm. A photo of a line drawing for the type from page 50 is attached.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385018
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, weighs 16.9 gms, and grades superb quality (EF+) to (FDC) mint state. This beautiful piece features on the obverse (Obv.) the young bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style that what is normally seen. The young dainty features portray an eternally young goddess, and this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. The entire obverse design also portrays a Macedonian hoplite shield, and the outer rim shows Macedonian royal stars seen within semi-circles. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First Region.). There is also an (A) monogram seen within the framing ivy wreath, and this may refer to Amphipolis. The coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and subsequently, no coinage was struck in the region for another half century. This piece has some mint luster, is in superb condition, and an exceptional artistic style which all make this beautiful coin scarce on the market. An exceptional Greek coin struck under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7; Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1338146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This attractive flawless Roman glass vessel is an aubergine colored jar that dates circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a deep dark brown/purple color with some light spotty silvered patina both on the inside and outside surfaces. The deep dark brown color is also very desirable, as most Roman glass pieces of this color are much lighter in color. There is also some spotty minute root marking and a multi-colored iridescence seen on various sections of the piece. This piece also has a zigzag trailing decoration (six times up and down) that is seen running around the piece, and connects on the upper shoulder and the outer lip of the vessel. The lip of the vessel also has a rounded trailing piece that runs around the upper lip. This pleasing piece also has four evenly-spaced indented sides, in addition to an indented bottom. These indentations made this piece easier to handle, and allowed the vessel to sit upright. Roman glass vessels of this type with a deep dark brown/purple coloration are also scarce on the market. Another analogous vessel of the same type and size was offered in Chrisite's Antiquities, New York, April 2016, no. 108. ($1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates, $1.375.00 realized. Note: This vessel is also the more common dark green color. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 417. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1351887
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare and esoteric piece is an Olmec seated duck poison bottle that dates circa 1100-800 B.C. This vessel is attributed to the Las Bocas region of Mexico, and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This piece has an attractive lustrous black glaze, along with some spotty light brown burnishing that is seen on all of the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is also in the form of a hollow container, as the top of the head has an opening into the hollow section of the lower body. This type of vessel is also known as a "poison bottle", as they generally held a substance such as red cinnabar or another hallucinogenic powder or liquid. This vessel was likely used in a ceremonial capacity, and this was likely the case for the majority of glazed Olmec vessels that depict birds such as ducks, raptors, and songbirds. (Another analogous "poison bottle" vessel of this type portraying a raptor is seen in "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, 1996, Harry Abrams Pub., no. 61, p. 183. See attached photo.) The esoteric vessel offered here has a very animated face with dotted eyes, and two squat legs and an extended tail that serve as a tripod base for the vessel. There is also a "double dot-and-bar" symbol seen between the eyes, and the eyes also appear to represent dots as well. The "four-dots-and-bar" motif is also thought to represent the "axis mundi", as the conduit between the Olmec natural and supernatural realms, and the two dotted eyes together with the "double dot-and-bar" symbol, may be a representation of the "four-dots-and-bar" motif. The symbolism seen on this piece also reinforces the theory that this piece was created as a ceremonial type vessel. This piece is an exceptional example of Olmec ceramic art, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249675
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche seated man that is Moche IV Period, circa 450-550 A.D., and is approximately 8.3 inches high. This interesting piece is intact, save for a minute filled stress crack in the upper stirrup-handle, and is in superb condition with vibrant dark red, light brown, and cream colors. This piece is a seated Moche man who is dressed with regal ear flares, a wrapped headdress, a dark red back sack, and a cream colored tunic. The individual portrayed here does appear to have some social status in a regal or religious context, as he is seen finely dressed, and he is also seen holding a ceramic in each hand which may point to a ceremonial activity. This individual displays a pronounced facial deformity, which was also held in high regard by the Moche, as this was thought to be a sign from the gods. Special status and sacredness may have been accorded to those who suffered diseases and other physical handicaps. The pronounced deformed face of this individual has skin drawn tight over the bones, and is likely the result of a tropical disease. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture, and the piece offered here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture. Moche ceramics that are medical related, and depict individuals with diseases and/or deformities such as this piece, are rare to extremely rare. Another analogous example that portrays a deformed face is seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., by Kathlenn Berrin, San Francisco, 1997, no. 69. (See attached photo. This portrait-head type vessel seen in the Larco Herrara Museum may also be a portrait of the same individual as seen on the ceramic offered here. Both pieces have analogous features and are both Moche IV Period.) The individual seen here with the deformed face and diminutive nose was likely caused by a tropical disease known as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symtoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasel septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring. (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) The piece seen here likely displays the disease noted above, rather than a battle injury, or a ritualistic mutilation, but whatever the case, this interesting piece is an extremely rare Moche vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357255
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This Roman gold earring is a complete example, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately .45 inches in diameter for the hoop, and the facing shield emblem is approximately .38 inches in diameter. This piece weighs 1.1 grams, and is solid gold and is not plated. The facing hemispherical shield emblem seen on this piece is not completely smooth as most examples, as it has hand beaten sculpted lines that run through the shield. The clasp has been tied off as it was worn everyday by the owner in antiquity, but with some adjustments, this piece can easily be worn today. This piece is solid and is very durable as well. A nice intact example that is complete, with no repair and/or restoration. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb Greek vessel is a silver plate and/or shallow bowl that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, by 7 inches in diameter, by 1/16th inch thick on the average. This scarce piece has a dark gray patina, with some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits that are seen on both sides of the vessel, and in addition, is an intact mint quality vessel in "as found" condition. This piece is a solid, thick, and heavy silver plate and/or shallow bowl that has a beaded hammered edge, and has a slightly oval form. There is also a single attached silver ring handle that easily moves up and down within it's flat "leaf-shaped" mount. This allowed this plate and/or bowl to be hung either in a room, or in a mobile fashion from a wagon or horse. This piece was hammered over a mold, and has very minute micro marks and root marking. The overall design of this vessel is rare, especially with the added ring handle which appears to be original with this vessel. Greek silver vessels of this type with the added ring handle are also thought to be Greco-Thracian, and were often produced in Greek coastal centers for export. An analogous example is seen in "Silver for the Gods", Toledo Museum exhibition catalog, 1977, p. 82, no. 45. This piece is an exceptional heavy example for the type, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1047632
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This cute piece is a Colima standing warrior that dates circa 150 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches high and is intact, with no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a light red/orange terracotta, and has some minute dark black spotty dendrite deposits. This piece is also a whistle, with an opening at the top and at the back of the hollowed head. The whistle is well made, and makes quite a sharp high-pitched tone. This piece was likely ceremonial, and may have been part of a group ceremony. This type of piece is also known as a "protector" type piece, and is thought to protect the deceased in the afterlife. The standing warrior seen here is nude, and is seen holding the full body length shield with both hands. The shield is leaning against the upper body of the warrior, and only the upper half of his face/head is seen peeking above the upper end of the shield. The design of the curved shield protects a great deal of his body, and it is probable that this stance illustrates the type of warfare that was conducted by the ancient Colima. It is unknown if he is part of a shield wall with many warriors, as was the case of the phalanx formation that was deployed by the ancient Greeks, or if he is simply depicted as an individual warrior in combat. The warrior is also seen wearing a turkey tail feather crest/helmet, and this makes him seem larger than life and more imposing. (A turkey whistle with analogous designed tail feathers, as the crest design seen here, is seen in "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico" by Michael Kan, Los Angeles County Art Museum, 1989, no.169.) An interesting piece that has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Yvette Arnold collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Fl. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1353070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This piece is a Roman silver denarius minted circa late 168- early 169 A.D., Rome mint, and is a rare to scarce issue, as it is the last issue minted by the Rome mint in the name of Lucius Verus. This coin is very fine/about very fine (VF/VF-), is 2.5g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin shows the image of Lucius Verus facing right, wearing an olive wreath, and around is the legend L VERVS AVG-ARM PARTH MAX. The reverse shows a draped and seated Aequitas-Moneta facing left, holding scales in her right hand to the front, and behind is a cornucopia, and around is the legend TRPVIIIIMDV-COSIII. Lucius Verus was joint emperor with Marcus Aurelius, circa 161-169 A.D., and the coin offered here was likely minted in the period shortly before or during the death of Verus early in 169 A.D.; and according to the BMC reference (British Museum Catalog), this coin was minted as the last issue of Lucius Verus by the Rome mint. Both emperors at this point in time were outside of Rome, and were beginning to be engaged in a bitter campaign in Germania in securing the empire. In the prior six years, both emperors were engaged in a protracted war in Parthia and Armenia, and as a consequence, by 169 A.D., the imperial treasury was severely drained of funds. In addition, a serious plaque brought back from the east swept through the legions and the general population, which reduced taxes and revenues to the empire. The coinage also became slightly debased, from an average of circa 3.0-3.2 grams, circa 161-169 A.D., to about 3.0 grams for a silver denarius, circa 169-170 A.D. (See D.R. Walker, "The Metrology of the Roman Silver Coinage III", 1978, p. 125.) The coin offered here is rare to scarce due to the reasons noted above, and is among the rarest issues of Lucius Verus produced by the Rome mint, as this issue was minted over a short period of time, and there was a severe lack of metal from which to mint coinage. This may also explain why this coin also appears to be a "fourree", meaning it is an ancient coin with a base metal core and a precious metal exterior. The coin offered here appears to have a core that is a debased silver, and may contain a high concentration of tin and/or lead. One can see sections primarily on the obverse of this coin that show minute cracks where the outer layer is peeling away from the inner core, and in addition, sections of the edge of the flan under high magnification show a thin outer layer for both sides of the coin. It may be that Marcus Aurelius himself ordered the Rome mint to produce a coin of this type for the impending campaign in Germania, but what is known for certain is that this coin is a high quality "fourree", and was likely intentionally and officially produced by the Rome mint, and if this was the case, this was an extremely rare circumstance in the history of Roman coinage. A coin of extreme historical interest, and one of the best recorded examples. References: BMC 481-2, RIC 595, Sear 1544. Ex: Harlan Berk Ltd., Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1381237
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact Romano-Egyptian terracotta fish that dates to the Roman Period, circa 30 B.C.-324 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece was made with a dark red-tan clay, and was mold made from two halves. This attractive piece also some thick gray-white deposits, which was also made from it's original white gesso that coated the entire piece. This piece has a curved body that creates movement for the viewer, and there is an open mouth, a small vent hole under the body, and detailed fins. This piece was also likely a votive object that provided sustenance for the departed in the after-life, and this type of piece is also relatively scarce on the market. This piece also likely depicts a Nile perch, which was a popular fish in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Veracruz/Mayan tripod plate vessel that dates to the Early Postclassic Period, circa 900-1200 A.D., and is approximately 12.4 inches in diameter, by 5 inches high. This piece is made from a dark red clay, and has a dark orange glaze that covers the entire piece. There are also three incised decorative boxes that are evenly spaced on the outer bowl, and these boxes have a dark gray/black glaze with cream colored incised lines. These boxes contain geometric patterns that may represent solar symbols, and these decorative elements are identical, save for the addition of a single circle added in Box B, seen with four circles, with yet another additional circle added in Box C, seen with five circles. Together, the three boxes likely represent a single complex concept, such as the movement of the planets, or perhaps representing a symbolic reference to the "Palenque Triad". There is also a symbol seen on the bottom central section of the bowl, and this may be a solar symbol and/or a sky symbol as well. This piece also has three rounded legs that are designed as a rattle, and all three legs are functional. There is also a slightly flared flat rim, with evenly spaced decorative black bands that are seen on the top flat rim surface. This piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration, and is in superb condition with a very vibrant glaze. In addition, there are some spotty black mineral deposits. (Another analogous piece of this type and size was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1990, no. 236. $1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also relatively scarce on the market not only for the type, but also for the intact condition. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: