Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1320798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This superb Mayan "orange glazed" bowl with a glyph band dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 5.25 inches high by 7.75 inches in diameter. This piece is intact, and has some heavy root marking, along with some white calcite and spotty minute dark black mineral deposits. This attractive piece has a flat bottom, and has a graceful rounded body which gradually narrows towards the rim. This piece has a bright "orange glaze" with a red and black band seen just below the rim. Below this decorative red and black banded design, a black painted glyph band is seen running around the vessel that consists of fourteen identical glyphs. The detailed glyph band was also painted from right to left, and the beginning and end of the glyph band is seen, as the last glyph painted does not have the added "speech scrolls". The "speech scrolls" were not added to the last painted glyph, because the artist ran out of room within the overall composition, and could not over paint into the first painted glyph. This repeating glyph is also analogous to the glyph seen in "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Books Inc., New York, 2002, p. 146, Fig. 8-11. (See attached photo.) The glyph seen on the vessel offered here, along with the published glyph noted above, both have "speech scrolls" attached at the left side of the rounded main body of the glyph, and these "speech scrolls" represent a "quotative particle" in Mayan iconography, meaning as the term "quotative" indicates, certain particles (glyphs) attribute phrases to individuals as though these were the figure's utterances or actual speech. In the case of the glyph seen here, it is interpreted as "it is his saying", which may also be interpreted as "this vessel belongs to him". It is interesting to note that this glyph repeats again, and again, around the vessel within the glyph band, and in this case, the presence of this glyph tells us that this object belongs to someone. This type of possessive reference is a well-known reference seen in dedicatory Mayan ceramic texts. The piece offered here is as attractive, as it is interesting, and this type of Mayan ceramic is scarce on the market today. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1331598
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive brownware ceramic is a Mayan carved bowl that dates circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 9.75 inches in diameter, by 3.7 inches high. This powerful looking piece has a flat bottom with gently curved side walls, and this design made it very easy for catching liquids. This piece has detailed deep carving, within three rectangular panels, and this skilled carving is in the form of a head commonly known as a "Long-Lipped Monster", and was described as such in the Sotheby's reference noted below. This type of Mayan image is rare, although it is a known image relative to Mayan iconography. This rare image is designed in glyph form, and is comprised of a scroll eye, upturned snout, bared fangs, smoke scrolls curling at the back, and sections of crosshatched elements. Each of the three rectangular panels are also separated by two smooth petalled-shaped motifs, and the entire bowl thus has a floral-like appearance. The "Long-Lipped Monster" image depicted here may also represent what is known in Mayan iconography as a "Square-Nosed Serpent" image. According to Andrea Stone and Marc Zender in "Reading Maya Art, A Hieroglyphic Guide to Ancient Maya Painting and Sculpture", Thames and Hudson, London, 2011, p. 227: "This logograph combines ophidian and floral elements in the form of a band that makes several 90-degree turns, suggesting the upturned snout of a sinuous serpent. Eye and nose rest atop the band and beneath are several curly fangs and no lower jaw. This 'square' or 'fret-nosed serpent' is a prominent, albeit esoteric, feature of Maya art. It seems to embody a radiant life force, expelled through the mouth, nose, or center of a flower, and dispersed throughout the universe, much like mana in Polynesia." This logograph is also associated with Mayan ceremonial bloodletting, and it is also quite possible that the Mayan bowl offered here was a part of this ceremony, and this bowl is in essence, a Mayan ceremonial offering bowl. This vessel also has a light yellow/brown polychrome slip seen both over the inner and outer surfaces, and each of the three rectangular panels have traces of white stucco and red cinnabar that are seen down within the low relief areas of the deep carvings. The carvings seen within each of the three rectangular panels are nearly identical, and were each carved individually, such was the skill of the artist. In addition, the inner surface has a black band seen at the rim and a black circle applied to the inner flat base, and resembles a target for ceremonial bloodletting into the vessel. It's also interesting to note that the color red also contrasts with black, and is easily seen. There is also some attractive and extensive root marking and dark black/brown burnishing seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and there are also some spotty minute dark black mineral deposits which are normally seen on authentic vessels of this type. This piece is also 100% original, and was repaired from three large fragments. This limited repair also appears to have been done some time ago. The interior of the bowl is smooth, and also has a thin polychrome glaze on both the inner and outer surfaces. Overall, this piece is a fine example of a carved Mayan vessel, and the detailed and deep carving also gives this piece powerful eye appeal. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1995, no. 170. ($2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239393
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Vicus culture seated figurine that dates circa 200 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has a pleasing nice deep reddish-brown glaze, and has some minute root marking and some light blue/black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a stirrup-type vessel, and it has a flat bottom. The legs and arms are seen tucked in close to the seated body, and this figurine seems to exhibit an inner core that is changing from an animal form to a human form, or vice-versa. This piece is classified as a "transformation type" ceramic, and this can especially be seen with the human facial features relative to the almond shaped eyes and well defined nose. The wide mouth appears to exhibit this change as well, as does the dual lobed head which is an anthropomorphic animal feature which is attributed to an animal such as a monkey. This piece is also an excellent example of a ceramic from the Vicus culture of ancient Peru, due to the reasons noted above, and most pieces from this culture seem to exhibit some form of "transformation" from one degree to another. This piece is also "thick walled", and has some weight to the piece. The early Peruvian ceramics from this culture were also fired at about 400 degrees C, thus producing a "thick walled" ceramic, as opposed to the subsequent Peruvian cultures such as the Moche, which produced "thin walled" ceramics which were fired at about 1000 degrees C. This piece is also analogous to an example seen in "Arts Ancient du Perou" by Bernard Villaret, Times Editions Pub., 1978, p. 51. (See attached photo.) This attractive piece has some weight, as one handles this piece, and is in scarce mint condition with a vibrant deep reddish-brown glaze. One of the best recorded examples. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 119, Zurich, 1987. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 11/23/1984, no. 584912, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388453
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta bust that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high. This large bust is intact, save a small edge chip around the vent hole hole rim seen at the back of the head, and is a terracotta that likely represents a goddess such as Demeter. This goddess is also seen wearing an elaborate and thick diadem, and has a very serene face. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some spotty earthen and mineral deposits. This piece is a pleasing example for the type, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 4.7 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339561
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These two fine designed pieces are two matching Viking bronze bracelets that date, circa 9th-10th century A.D. These two Viking culture pieces are approximately 3 inches long, by 2.6 inches in diameter for one bracelet; and the other bracelet is slightly larger and is approximately 3.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches in diameter. Both of these beautiful examples have matching hand stamped intricate pattern design work, and they were made from a single sheet of bronze, hand stamped, then folded into the form seen today. These pieces still retain some flexibility, and in antiquity, they were able to easily flex for the wearer of these bracelets who was likely a young woman. These pieces have a lovely dark green patina, with some attractive spotty dark blue azurite mineral deposits seen in various outer and inner sections of both bracelets. These pieces both display a hand stamped "triangular symbol", with three dots within, that are designed interlocking and are seen running around the perimeter within a double dotted border. There are also two raised bars that run through the middle, and there is a minute and detailed "interwoven cable pattern" seen between, and this "interwoven cable pattern" is seen again on each side of the bracelets. There are also four raised dots with a dotted border that may solar symbols, and extensive minute dotted line work is seen in various sections of the bracelets. The overall hand stamped design seen on both bracelets is very finely done, and the composition of the design work seen on both bracelets match. Only a skilled artist for the period could have produced the matching hand stamped composition seen on both pieces. Both of these nice examples are 100% original, and are intact, save for the slightly larger example that has two strengthened and repaired stress cracks which is normal for very thin bronze metal pieces such as these. These pieces are scarce with the high degree of workmanship seen on these two beautiful pieces, and fine high quality minute Viking hand stamped work is not often seen on the market. These pieces sit on a custom display stand, and can easily removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1362411
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb Roman bronze is a portrait bust of the Roman emperor, Marcus Aurelius, and dates circa 170-180 A.D. This mesmerizing piece is approximately 1.35 inches high, by .8 inches wide, and is a complete bust with most of the lower neck. This piece was part of a figurine, and was broken at the lower neckline, and the bust is a complete example, with no cracks and no other noticeable areas of damage. This realistic portrait bust is in superb condition, and has a beautiful light to dark green patina with some minute red spotty highlights. In addition, there are some light green and blue deposits seen mostly on the inner surface of the piece. This piece is classified as a "Type IV" portrait of Marcus Aurelius, as it shows the emperor in an advanced age with a very full beard. The beard is also divided in the center of the chin that also shows parallel locks of hair. This "Type IV" convention of art can easily be seen on this portrait bust, along with the distinctive arc of hair that frames the forehead. The emperor is also seen wearing a diadem crown in the hair which also signifies the wearer as being regal in status. The overall look of the face also conveys the Stoic nature of this emperor-philosopher, and conveys a peaceful ideal. (For the portrait type see: Klaus Fittschen and P. Zanker, "Katalog Der Romischen Portrats in den Capitolinischen Museen und den Anderen Kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom", 3V., Berlin: P. von Zabern, 1983-2010.) Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus ruled from circa 161-180 A.D., along with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from circa 161 until Verus' death in 169. During his reign, the empire defeated a revitalized Parthian empire, and fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmations with success during the Marcomannic Wars, but it was the Germanic tribes that Marcus fought incessantly with during the remaining years of his rule. The realistic portrait bust offered here was likely created during this time, and is likely a provincial portrait, which may also have been in a private shrine where the Roman legions were stationed near Germania along the Danube. Whatever the case, this portrait served a Roman well in the period in which it was created, and is an excellent image of this important emperor. This attractive piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Switzerland. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this complete piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This solid piece can also be easily mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece as it was done in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381605
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is a Chancay canteen type vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 9 inches wide, by 4.5 inches thick through the main body of the vessel. This piece is a scarce "black-on-red" Chancay canteen vessel, as the majority of Chancay vessels are "black-on-cream" type vessels, and tend to be rather thin walled. The piece offered here is very durable, as it has thick walls, although it was a mold-made type vessel. This piece has attractive black geometric patterns seen on a red background on both sides of the vessel, and a raised rounded spout at the top, that also has the face and head of a god built into the spout. The face of the god appears to have tattoos, and has a very prominent nose. The handles of the vessel also double as arms, and there appears to be black painted hands seen at the top of each handle where it meets the spout. The god seen here may depict a Chancay "water-god", as this culture existed in a very arid region in ancient Peru. This intact piece is also in superb condition, with no repair and/or restoration, and has vibrant colors. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note this piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #1242679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This scarce piece is a Chimu/Inka culture silver mask that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This piece is approximately 8 inches wide by 6.9 inches high by 1 inch deep. This appealing designed piece is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the lower nose section, and is complete with no restoration/repair. This piece has a nice dark gray patina with some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and thick dark/light brown mineral deposits are seen on the back side of this piece. This piece was also hand beaten from a single silver sheet, and there are punched cheek, nose, and mouth details. There are also two punched horizontal shaped eye holes, and two holes on each side which were used to tie this powerfully primitive designed piece to a textile shrouded mummy bundle. This piece also has very little bend, and also served as a solid cover for the mummy bundle. The primitive design of this piece may also have been designed to represent the departed in the spirit world, and also served to protect the mummy. This piece is also the normal size for a piece of this type, and another scarce piece of this type classified as Chimu culture is seen in "Peru, Durch Die Jahrtausende", Verlag Aurel Bongers KG, Recklinghausen 1984, Austria, Kat.-Nr. 11.67, Linden-Museum, Stuttgart, Museum no. M 31 059. (The Stuttgart example is approximately 8 inches high and has analogous punched out eye holes, and punched nose and facial details. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a powerfully primitive designed facial image that defines the essence of Pre-Columbian Andean art. This striking piece also comes with a custom shadow box, and can easily be removed, as it is mounted within with removable plastic tabs. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 149, Lot 371, Zurich, circa 1990. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1290942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1 inch wide, is ring size 6.5, and was made for a young man or woman. This ring has an oval shaped hoop, and this shape provided for a wide face that looks very large when worn on the finger. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today as well. This piece has sections of original gold gilt seen over the bronze, and this piece has a brilliant translucent orange carnelian stone that is firmly attached to the bronze bezel. The beautiful carnelian stone was never reattached to the ring, and it is firmly in place in it's original setting. The brilliant orange carnelian stone also has a carved image of a seated animal, possibly a dog or a fox. This animal is seen on a ground line, and has raised ears and a long curled tail. The brilliant orange carnelian stone is also highly polished, has an oval shape, a flat bottom, and is clear save for a small black inclusion that is deep within the stone. This piece was also used as a personal seal/signet ring, and makes a sharp impression. The condition of this piece is superb, and is intact with no repair/restoration, and has original gold gilt seen on the inner and outer surfaces of the bronze bezel. Overall, this attractive piece is in better condition than most examples of its type, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Inv. #P33-091-031915. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1389309
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This scarce piece is an Etruscan Black Ware bucchero vessel stand that dates to the mid 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches in diameter at the top rim, and is 2.8 inches high. This interesting ceramic also has a deep lustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, and is known as a "bucchero" type ceramic. This piece has an indented round depression seen at the top, and this likely held a glass vessel, or a vessel such as an aryballos with a rounded bottom. This piece also has a raised stem on a round flat base, and the entire piece is very durable, as it is thick-walled. This vessel also has an old inventory tag attached to the bottom showing the "No. 38", and "Orvieto", which was one of the major Etruscan cities from antiquity. This piece is intact, and has exceptional surfaces with some minute root marking and spotty white mineral deposits. A scarce type vessel not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,185.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is a thick walled example, and is also a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are in fact, an added plus towards the value of the piece. This attractive piece has an exceptional dark green patina with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is very desirable, due to the reasons noted above, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze, and was hammered into shape and the form we see today. This piece was finished with detailed repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "Classical Period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian Empire) deep bowls. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great, who subsequently paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece also comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980.s-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1384480
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek bronze jewelry mold that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .3 inches thick. This complete piece was cast as one solid piece and has a flat back, a single hole for suspension seen below the rounded top, and two extended handles with mounting holes seen on each side of the main body of the piece. This piece was also likely secured with cords through the extended handles to a flat surface, and the artist was then able to apply pressure to the mold. A thin sheet of gold or silver was placed into the mold, and pressure into the mold with a tool formed half of the body of the acorn. Two halves were subsequently joined together to form the complete decorative acorn that were often strung side-by-side into a necklace. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and appears to have some minute wear from use in antiquity. The bronze mold offered here is extremely rare, and offers some insights as to how ancient jewelry was produced. This piece may also have been suspended by a cord with other molds of various sizes in a workshop. This piece also comes with a custom display stand, can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand, and is an extremely rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #12608. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385336
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Colima water carrier figurine that dates to the Proto-classic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 13.25 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a nice even deep red glaze over the entire outer surface, save the bottoms of the flat feet. This piece also stands solidly by itself, and the water carrier seen here has a large jar on his back that has detailed ropes and fittings which are not normally seen on scarce pieces of this type. This water carrier also has his hands behind his head in order to steady his heavy load, and he also has a serene expression which runs counter to one that has a heavy load on his back. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, and the surfaces show little wear. An exceptional example seldom seen on the market. Ex: Sotheby's pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 387. ($5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $9,000.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. Published: Featured in the ATADA Online Show, Aug. 9-19 2018 (www.atada.org/online-show). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1169806
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large piece is a "Veracruz" culture standing priest, Remojadas type, that dates from the Classic period, circa 450-650 A.D. This piece is approximately 22.5 inches high, and easily stands by itself on a custom wooden stand. This piece is of an artistic style, known as "Remojadas", which is the name of a particular archaeological site, although objects in closely related styles actually come from a number of different sites in Veracruz. The name "Remojadas" thus refers to objects from south-central Veracruz, generally from the Classic-period. This piece is also known as a "Xipe-Toltec" type priest, as he portrays the god in costume. The "Xipe-Toltec" cult flourished along the Gulf Coast of modern day Mexico during the Classic and early Postclassic periods before gaining a prominent place in the Aztec pantheon, probably as a result of the subsequent Aztec domination of the Gulf Coast in the mid-15th century. Most Xipe figures vividly depict a human inside a flayed skin of another man, and this god was known as "Our Lord the Flayed One". According to Charles Phillips in "Aztec and Maya", Lorenz Pub., London, 2007, p. 62: "Victims killed in honour of Xipe Totec, the god of planting and vegetation, were shot with arrows so that their blood flowed into the earth like life-giving waters. Indeed, the Aztecs called human blood "chalchiuatl" (precious water). The corpse was then flayed and a priest would wear the skin in honour of the god. The rite was a celebration of the splitting of seeds that makes possible the growth of new vegetation each spring." Mary Miller and Karl Taube in "Ancient Mexico and the Maya", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1993, p. 188 also add: "At the time of the Conquest the Xipe festival fell during the spring, in our month of March, and much of its imagery suggests agricultural renewal: as a seed germinates, it feeds off the rotting hull around it, finally letting the new shoot emerge. The Xipe impersonators wore the old skins until they were rotten, when the young man once again emerged." The Xipe-Toltec piece offered here displays a priest wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim, as seen with the rolled skin folds seen hanging below the neck, the skin leggings, the skin bundles tied at the back shoulder and the right hip, and the human skin mask. There are black-bitumen painted highlights seen on the headband with medallions, earplugs, lips, and eyes. There are also black-bitumen painted extruded eyeballs that are seen hanging from the eye openings, and the black lips accentuate an open mouth that shows this dramatic figurine chanting in a ritual posture. This expressive figure is also holding a floral designed fan with petals, which may represent the Xipe ritual of regeneration. This piece is made from a light gray terracotta, and has light tan mineral deposits. This complete piece was repaired from several large fragments, which is usually the case for large-scale Veracruz pieces such as this, and this piece is a better example than what is usually seen. The floral fan is an attribute that is seldom seen as well, and this is a principle reason why this large example is a scarce to rare type. The floral fan also indicates that the individual depicted is likely in the act of performing the "Xipe-Toltec" regeneration ceremony, along with the fact that this priest is seen with an open mouth who appears to be chanting in the act of the regeneration ceremony which ensured the planting and growth of the new years crops. The majority of these figurines are seen simply standing in an upright position, and are not seen holding any implements of any sort, but more importantly, the majority of these Veracruz "Xipe-Toltec" figurines do not display a dramatic facial expression such as this example. (Another Veracruz "Remojadas" example of this type and of the same size is offered in Bonhams African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2012, no. 3. $8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates, $10,000.00 realized.) For the type offered here see: "Ancient Art of Veracruz", Ethnic Arts Council of Los Angeles, 1971, no. 31. The piece offered here is definitely ceremonial in nature, and easily conveys this fact to the viewer, which is not often the case relative to figurines of this type. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bonhams Art & Artifacts of the Americas auction, San Francisco, Sept. 2012, no. 1039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1307575
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional Greek ceramic is a Messapian trozella that dates circa 400-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has two applied strap handles to a pear-shaped body that has a raised foot. The handles also have four disks built into the handle junctions, and the description "trozella" has the meaning "little wheels", and "trozella" is a very appropriate description for vessels of this type. The esoteric piece offered here is an early example, as it has a shorter pear-shaped body with a footed base, rather than an extended body with a raised foot with a spread base. The earlier examples are much rarer, and often have beautiful detailed painting as the example has here. Vessels of this type also generally have painted sections that are worn, and in many cases the painted images are completely worn off, but the images seen on this exquisite vessel are nearly entirely intact, and can clearly be seen on both sides of the vessel. These vessels were also painted after the vessel was fired in the kiln, and were quickly re-fired again, and this is why the painted images seen on vessels of this type are generally faded and are not very bright. The painting seen on this exceptional piece is extremely fine and detailed, and shows reddish-brown acanthus patterns on the upper shoulder that are connected with a single fine line with added dots. There are added geometric "cross-and-line" patterns seen on various sections of the vessel, and the two boxes seen on the upper shoulder have dark red defining lines. The overall esoteric design of this vessel, along with the delicate painting, make this vessel one of the finest examples of this type that has been on the market. The description "Messapian" also refers to the Greek colonists and native Greek peoples that settled in the southern heel of Italy. It is unkown if this early example was produced locally, or was a production in a Greek city made for import into the region. Given the delicate Greek acanthus designs, and the fact that this piece is a rarer earlier example, I am leaning to the latter scenario that this piece may have been produced for import into the region. This piece also has some minute dark spotty black mineral deposits, along with some heavier root marking seen on the inside of the vessel and the upper flat rim. Another analogous vessel that is a later type, was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, Dec. 2007, no. 129. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $4,688.00 realized.) The vessel offered here is rare on the market, as it is an early example, has delicately painted fine design work, and is in mint condition. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388722
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Greek terracotta of a nude Aphrodite, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.75 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas stand. On the stand it is approximately 8 inches high. This esoteric piece was mold made, and was finished with detailed sculpting. This piece is a nude Aphrodite that is portrayed emerging from her bath, and this beautiful piece was modeled after the renowned 4th century B.C. masterpiece known as the Cnidian Aphrodite by Praxiteles, who in portraying the goddess as she emerges from her bath, epitomized the ancient ideal of feminine sensuality. Kozloff and Mitten commented in "The Gods delight, The Human Figure in Classical Bronze, p. 106", that the universal attraction of this pose can be summarized in the psychology of the experience from that of the viewer, in that: "the viewer became, in essence, a voyeur, allowed to behold something that was at once enticing and forbidden." Kozloff further elaborates: "from each point of view, a special aspect of her beauty is stressed; the face from the left, the buttocks from the back, the breasts from the right, and the pelvis from the front. Her gestures are decorous, and her pose is convincingly self-protective." The Aphrodite offered here is also seen crouched down while looking away to see if she was seen emerging from her bath. Her hair is also pulled back into a bun, which is also very detailed. Her nude body is also perfectly molded, and there are few Hellenistic Greek terracottas that are completely nude, as most are draped to some degree. This piece is also intact and is complete, save for sections of her missing arms and her lower extremities. Overall, this esoteric piece is of a type that is seldom seen on the market, and displays exceptional artistic style. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1399042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,876.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a heavy bronze Inka battle ax that dates circa 1440-1532 A.D., and is approximately 5.5 inches long, by 6 inches high from blade tip to blade tip, by 1 inch thick at the blunt terminal end. This massive piece was cast as one piece, then hand beaten into shape with a slightly sharp blade. This piece has a hole in the blunt terminal end, and a rod ran through this hole to hold this heavy piece in place in the wooden shaft. This heavy piece obviously generated tremendous force with an overhead and downward blow, and very little could have stopped this type of weapon from doing heavy damage. It's also quite likely that this weapon was produced to support the Inka in their imperial expansion, especially with their absorbing of the Chimu Empire circa 1470 A.D. This complete piece is also in mint "as found" condition, as it also has a beautiful thick dark to light green patina with spotty red highlights. This appealing piece is an exceptional Inka work of arms, and is seldom seen on the market in this extra large size and condition. A custom metal display stand is also included. (For a nearly identical type see: "Cobre: The Copper of Ancient Peru", AFP Integra Pub., no. 161. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258851
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two beautiful pieces are two matching solid Greek gold earrings that date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. These two large examples are approximately 1.2 inches in diameter, and are 1/8 wide at the square terminal ends. These pieces weigh approximately 5.1 grams and 7.7 grams, as one piece has a slightly larger rounded inner hoop diameter, and a slightly larger square terminal end. These large and somewhat heavy pieces were worn through pierced ears, and the square terminal ends held them in place, as the main body of these pieces are rounded to easily run through the pieced ears. These pieces are a scarce type, although they are a simple design, and were easy to adjust to the individual. In this case, the slightly larger inner rounded diameter size of one earring may have been custom made for a wealthy lady in antiquity, who may have had a larger pieced ear hole on one ear than the other. The outer width diameter of both pieces is a perfect match with an approximate diameter of 1.2 inches, although the inner rounded diameter sizes are slightly different from one another, with one hoop slightly thicker than the other. This type of construction is a good indication that these pieces were perhaps custom made for one individual. These pieces are also solid, and have fine etched line design seen on all four sides of the square terminal ends. These pieces also have some minute deposits, extremely minute scratches, and a slight oxidized yellowish patina which is consistent with ancient gold pieces. These solid pieces are also in mint to superb condition with no cracks and/or repair, and are in fact solid enough so that they can even be worn today. These beautiful pieces also hang from a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and have a bright yellow color that can be seen at a great distance. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Veracruz/Mayan tripod plate vessel that dates to the Early Postclassic Period, circa 900-1200 A.D., and is approximately 12.4 inches in diameter, by 5 inches high. This piece is made from a dark red clay, and has a dark orange glaze that covers the entire piece. There are also three incised decorative boxes that are evenly spaced on the outer bowl, and these boxes have a dark gray/black glaze with cream colored incised lines. These boxes contain geometric patterns that may represent solar symbols, and these decorative elements are identical, save for the addition of a single circle added in Box B, seen with four circles, with yet another additional circle added in Box C, seen with five circles. Together, the three boxes likely represent a single complex concept, such as the movement of the planets, or perhaps representing a symbolic reference to the "Palenque Triad". There is also a symbol seen on the bottom central section of the bowl, and this may be a solar symbol and/or a sky symbol as well. This piece also has three rounded legs that are designed as a rattle, and all three legs are functional. There is also a slightly flared flat rim, with evenly spaced decorative black bands that are seen on the top flat rim surface. This piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration, and is in superb condition with a very vibrant glaze. In addition, there are some spotty black mineral deposits. (Another analogous piece of this type and size was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1990, no. 236. $1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also relatively scarce on the market not only for the type, but also for the intact condition. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1392094
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This lively piece is a Parthian/Near Eastern bronze leaping lion handle, and dates circa 150 B.C.-225 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches long, by 3.8 inches high, as seen on it's custom display stand. This piece is also complete, with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast as one solid piece. The lively lion seen here has his head turned to the right, and appears to look back at the individual who can easily hold this piece firmly with one hand. The lion is also seen with his mouth open, and appears to be roaring at the viewer. The lion is also seen leaping, and his two front paws were designed to fit over the rim of a vessel, as there is also a groove under the paws. This piece is a rare example, and is likely Parthian, as the artistic style of this piece is very analogous to other works of art attributed to this culture. (For another analogous example attributed to the Parthian period that is of the exact size and type, see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals. The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European Art.", Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, no. 659. See attached photos.) This piece also has a beautiful dark brown and green patina, and is mounted on a custom marble display stand. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1054243
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting Moche vessel is in the form of a skeletal head, and it dates circa 200-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece is mold made from a light brown terracotta, and there are spotty dark black and brown dotted deposits. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as the eyes and mouth are framed with shrunken skin not unlike a death skull. There is some academics that think this type of Moche portraiture displays an ancestor from the underworld, or it may portray a sacrifical victim that is seen with his skin ceremoniously flayed back away from the face. Whatever the case may be, there are many Moche vessels that portray a skeletal figurine, and there is likely a spiritual and/or underworld connection to this genre of Moche art. This piece has a flat bottom and is also designed with an upward tilt, in order that the face looks upward at the viewer. This piece is truly a powerful Moche image, and may also represent a "transformation" piece that may be a bridge between the living and the underworld. Ex: Andrea Sarmiento collection, Miami, FL. Ex: Erika Roman estate, Santa Cruz, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239527
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Salinar/Viru culture monkey "transformation" type vessel that dates circa 400-200 B.C. This piece is approximately 9 inches long by 7 inches high, and is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece is a standing quadruped with a stylized lobed monkey's head, and a short tail is seen curled at the back. This piece is seen standing on sturdy legs, with each flank painted with mythical creatures that have bared fangs and claws. The whole piece is covered with a light yellow-brown slip, and the mythical creatures and facial elements are painted in a light reddish-orange color. This piece is also a "stirrup-handle" type piece that is also designed as a "whistle" type vessel, as it makes a shrill sound when one blows into the raised end of the handle, and as such, this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel. In addition, this piece also represents a "transformation" type vessel, as the stylized lobed head on the monkey has human and animal features. This rare early Andean culture ceramic may also be a prototype for the subsequent Moche I ceramics, and as such, this type of piece set the standard for Andean ceramics that have a great deal of realism regarding both human and animal representations. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a superb to mint quality example for the type that is seldom seen on the market. Another analogous example of this culture is seen in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 49. (See attached photo. The Lempertz example also has an analogous painted mythical creature on the flanks as the piece offered here, and both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop.) This type of piece is x-rare to rare, and has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1986. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available for the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 01/14/1991, no. 369012, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1304240
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This nice piece is a Roman bronze "crossbow type" fibula that dates circa early 4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition. This intact and complete piece has a main body that was cast as one piece, and there are three small decorative spheres were later added with pins. The single intact attachment pin was added to the horizontal arm, and engages in the straight section of the vertical section. This thin attachment pin still has some movement, and can move in and out of the vertical clasp, and up and down within the horizontal arm. The overall design of this attractive piece is in the form of a Latin Cross, and also represents Christ on the Cross. The "crossbow fibula" type was derived from the earlier Etruscan and Greek "bow type". The "crossbow type" fibula seen here was very common in the 4th and 5th century A.D., and is thought to have originated in the Danube region, from which it spread throughout the Roman Empire. The piece offered here is a male fibula, and was worn by soldiers, and by high ranking civil servants and officials. This piece was used primarily to fasten the cloak on the shoulder of the wearer. Many of these examples also had gold and silver gilt, and were inlaid with precious stones. The example offered here has no traces of gold and silver gilt, but it does have eight rounded holes seen in the flat section of the vertical arm, and these holes could have held mounted precious stones or glass. This piece also has a beautiful dark emerald green patina, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1400499
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce example is a Bactrian alabaster chalice that dates to the late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium B.C., circa 2100-1700 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 5.8 inches in diameter at the upper rim, and has a beautiful dark honey brown patina, with some heavy to light dark brown mineral deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece has a flat upper rim, elongated stemmed base, a flared upper body, and a low capacity bowl that has an inner rounded bottom. The carving is exceptional for a vessel such as this, as there are graceful curves and flared edges that are seen within the overall design of this vessel. This piece was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel, as the inner bowl has a low capacity for precious liquids, and in addition, this piece is rather heavy and takes two hands to comfortably handle. This esoteric piece was produced by a culture known as the "Bactria-Margiana" culture, and/or the "Oxus Civilization" culture, and was spread across an area encompassing Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Northern Afghanistan. This piece was carved from a fine white-veined alabaster, and vessels of this type were made for the ruling class and aristocratic elites. This complete piece has some limited repair seen mostly with the elongated stemmed base, and is an exceptional example for the type, as it is a complete example with a natural patina that has not been over cleaned as most examples have. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, December 2000, no. 681. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $3,290.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is an iron "grape picker" scythe that dates circa late 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is intact with no breaks and/or cracks, and is a solid intact example which is rare for an iron piece such as this. This complete piece has a heavy and solid dark to light brown earthen coating, of combined earthen and mineral deposits, which has sealed this iron piece from oxygen and deterioration. This piece has a square tang that was embedded into a wooden shaft, and a flat outer edge with an inner edge that was sharpened into an implement that was very efficient. The piece offered here is analogous to an iron "grape picker" that was found in an estate that was known to have produced grapes and wine. (This analogous piece of similar shape and size is published in "Ancient Country Houses on Modern Roads", Pub. Archaeological Receipts Fund, Athens, 2003, no. 318.) The piece offered here likely had many uses, but another use is known, and this piece was adapted into a deadly weapon that was used in battle. This type of piece was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse, and is known as a "grape picker" sickle weapon. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. An image of this type of piece is also seen as a mint mark symbol, and is seen on the reverse of a silver tetradrachm attributed to Alexander the Great, Babylon mint, circa 311-305 B.C. (See attached photo for the reverse of this coin. This coin type is also published in Martin Price, "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991, no. 3768. It is also thought that this coin was minted in Babylon as military pay for the armies of Alexander who were at Babylon at his death in 323 B.C.) It is also very likely that this type of weapon was used by Alexander's armies in his fight against heavy Persian armored cavalry. The piece offered here was also found in a collection of iron spearheads with the same type of patina and earthen deposits. This piece is an example of an extremely rare weapon that also had other utilitarian uses. This piece is also mounted on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381567
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This attractive piece is a Greek black glazed glaux skyphos, and dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 5.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in intact condition, with no repair and/or restoration. Overall, this piece is in superb to mint quality condition, save for some minor spotty roughness in the glaze of the outer surface, and has some spotty white calcite deposits. This piece has a deep lustrous black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and has a very distinctive design feature with one vertical and one horizontal handle. Both of these handles also have a different design, with the horizontal handle having a round design, and the vertical handle having a thick, flat design. The vertical handle was designed to hold this scarce vessel with the index finger, and the other handle was used to control the pouring of a liquid, such as concentrated wine that was mixed with water. The handle design also refers to the common name that this scarce type of vessel is known as, and this vessel type is often referred to as a "glaux skyphos". The bottom of the vessel has a small black dot, seen within a dark orange reserve, that is also seen within the bottom ring base. The piece offered here is seldom seen in this condition, and is one of the better recorded examples. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398950
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric green hard stone piece is a Valdivia-Chorrera hacha that dates circa 1500-600 B.C., and is approximately 5.85 inches long, by 4 inches wide, by 1.7 inches thick. This piece was produced by the Valdivia-Chorrera culture that lived in modern day Ecuador, and was one of the earliest pre-Columbian cultures of South America. This piece is a votive type object and is shaped as a battle ax, and is a type that is also referred to as a "hacha". This piece was smoothed and polished into the refined form that we see today, and this process was very labor intensive. The surfaces of this piece are very refined, and one can easily see the veins and multi-colored inclusions which enhances it's sacred "raison d'etre". This piece is also a hard serpentine type stone, and it's dark green color was highly prized among many pre-Columbian cultures. A near identical example was offered at Christie's, Paris, Art Pre-Columbian: Collection Felix Et Heidi Stoll ET A Divers Amateurs, April, 2019, no. 8. (1,000.00-1,500.00 Euro estimates. 1,000.00 Euro realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,800.00
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful and even dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. (See attached photo.) The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. This piece is extremely rare, and so much so, it has also been labeled as "Teotino culture" by some pre-Columbian experts. In addition, this piece has been published as "Nazca (?) culture" by the Sakler Foundation, and has had extensive academic research and testing by their pre-Columbian academics, including Elizabeth Benson and Paul Clifford. The description of this published piece offered here, therefore follows the Sakler academic description as: Nasca (?), Peru, South Coast. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, circa 1970's, accession no. N-110. Published: "Art of the Andes", (As noted above), 1983, no. 143. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398684
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive and complete piece is a Roman bronze hanging lamp that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This two-part piece is approximately 4.7 inches long, by 1 inch high for the main body of the lamp; and 4 inches long, by 2 inches high for the hanging nail hook. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with dark red highlights, and is in superb "as found" condition; as the hanging chain is complete, the hanging nail hook is intact, and the attachment lanyards on the lamp are intact. This piece was also cast as one piece, and the main body of the lamp has raised round circles at the bottom base which diffused heat. This lamp also has a double spout, and the hanging nail hook allowed this lamp to be extremely portable, and there is a distinct possibility that this lamp was made for a Roman legion that was on the move. A superb complete hanging lamp not often seen on the market in this superb condition. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce extremely large piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact, and is in mint condition with no repair/restoration. The surface of this exceptional piece also has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina, along with a rich glossy black glaze, and in addition, there is some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel that features a vibrant facing Silenus head that was mold made, and has very high relief, as it is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type usually do not have this added design feature. This large piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. An intact and scarce x-large vessel that is seldom seen the market, and is one of the best recorded examples for he type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is very fine to superb (VF/EF+), with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring", and dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom, and was mounted on a war chariot that served as a guide for the horse reins. The reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer greater control over the horses. The design of this piece, with a raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins that connected to the two horses that pulled a Celtic war chariot. This piece also has an attachment loop at the base which was mounted down into a wooden rail, and was held in place by a pin. This esoteric piece was also made when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain, circa 55 B.C., and the war chariot was relatively new to the Romans as a weapon of war. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a shield and spear, gave the Romans all they could handle at the time of the invasion. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the Gallic tribe whose capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooded frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology, and the piece offered here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This complete piece has a graceful shape, has no repair/restoration, and has a beautiful dark green patina. There is also some spotty mineral deposits seen mostly on the underside of the piece. Another analogous piece of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no. 339. (2500-3500 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: E.T. Leeds "Celtic Ornament in the British Isles", Oxford, 1933, pp. 118-126. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1397608
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This beautiful ring is a Late Roman/Byzantine bronze ring with gold gilt that dates circa 6th-7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately ring size 4.75, and has an approximate .7 inches inner diameter. This intact ring was likely worn by a young girl, and has very attractive features; including remnants of gold gilt seen over the bronze in various sections of the piece, a brilliant pyramid cut deep red garnet, and a round gray/white glass paste inlay. The brilliant pyramid cut red garnet also seems to glow when seen with bright outdoor light, and this type of cut for this stone is scarce for the period, as most ring stones seen during this period have a polished oval type face, rather than a polished pyramid type face. The bezel also has a fine herringbone design that was engraved on each side, and there also is a minute tang at the bottom of the solid bronze ring hoop. The top inside of the bezel is also very smooth, and this is an indication that this ring was worn a number of years. A very pleasing ring with a great deal of eye appeal, and is solid enough that it can be worn today. A custom ring box is included, as well as a small hard case display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center, and is larger than most examples. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1396425
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These eight complete Greek "sling bullets" date to the 5th-4th century B.C., and are approximately 1 to 1.6 inches in length, by .4 to .7 inches in diameter. These pieces all have some light mineral deposits, and have a light dark gray-brown to tan patina. These relatively heavy lead pieces were mold made, and one can easily discern each half of the piece that was fitted into a "two-part mold". These pieces were fitted into a hand sling that generated tremendous force and speed as they were released from the sling. These weapons also have an almond shape, as most lead "sling bullets" have, and this shape provided a stable aerodynamic flight. These pieces also have some light marking and minute impact dents that indicate that many of these pieces were likely in battle. In addition, four of these pieces have lettering, and often refers to a city, a military general, or a battle message. These interesting pieces are all different sizes, and a custom display case is included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This pleasing piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C., and is approximately .75 inches high. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, who was a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsman. This piece had a suspension hoop at the backside, and was worn as a "protector" type amulet. The piece offered here has a thick dark green glaze, and has a detailed face with a serene smile. Ptah is also seen wearing a skull cap, although he appears to be bald. This superb conditioned bust is complete, save for the missing left ear, and has a realistic and better facial expression that most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Boeotian black glazed kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This large piece is approximately 10 inches high, by 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous vibrant black glaze seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of this vessel, and features added white decorative elements that are seen running around the vessel. These prominent decorative elements are ivy leaf tendrils, along with a chevron pattern that is seen below. The chevron pattern is also a rare decorative element, and this piece is one of the few known examples that features this element. This piece also has distinctive looped "strap handles" that raise gracefully above the main body of the vessel, and a raised "stem base". This large vessel was likely used for holding wine, and was used for drinking and/or for pouring libations in a religious ceremony. The ivy leaf decorative elements seen on this piece are also tied to Dionysus, who was the Greek god of wine and revelry. In addition, this type of vessel is often portrayed on painted pottery being held by Satyrs, who were bestial goat-men that were associated with drinking and Dionysian festivals. This piece is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. There are some minute stress cracks seen on the strap handles, but these are very minor and are difficult to see, and this vessel is a solid example which can be held today. There is also some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and the entire piece has a beautiful even lustrous black glaze. Most vessels of this type usually have a great deal of repair/restoration, and significant losses to the white painted decorative elements, but this is not the case with this exceptional and intact example, and this piece is also one of the best recorded examples. This piece is also analogous to the example found in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, no. 1993.197. Another piece of this type, size, and condition was sold in Christie's Antiquities, London, oct. 2011, no. 71. (3,000.00-5,000.00 Pound estimates, 6,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1357890
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete and detailed piece is a Roman bronze eagle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is a standing Roman eagle that is seen looking left, and has very realistic features. This piece has very detailed feathers seen on the outstretched wings, and well-defined dotted eyes. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This ceremonial piece was likely in a private Roman shrine known as a "lararium", and may also have been worshipped by a Roman legionnaire, as the Roman eagle represented Rome itself and was the symbol of the Roman military. This realistic piece also stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1395146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
These Bactrian Near Eastern and rare (50) fifty triangular fittings are carved from a hard limestone, and are approximately 2500-1800 B.C. These pieces are approximately .80-1.1 inches high, by .20 inches thick, and are all triangular shaped with a "notched rounded edge" that runs around the edge of each piece. These appealing and decorative pieces also have an attractive light to dark gray patina, and are all intact, save for five pieces that have repaired breaks. These pieces are in remarkable condition, as they could easily be damaged and/or shattered simply by dropping them on a hard surface, as they are relatively thin limestone plaques. The principle reason they are in their superb to mint quality "as found" condition, is that they were likely inlaid into an object such as a wooden box, a furniture piece, or possibly even the face of a wooden shield. A number of these pieces also have have a more pronounced patina on one side than the other, and this may also be an indication that these pieces were embedded into a perishable object as noted above. These pieces are a nice group of individually carved objects with a high degree of eye appeal. These pieces are also offered with a custom display case/frame, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: