Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398950
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric green hard stone piece is a Valdivia-Chorrera hacha that dates circa 1500-600 B.C., and is approximately 5.85 inches long, by 4 inches wide, by 1.7 inches thick. This piece was produced by the Valdivia-Chorrera culture that lived in modern day Ecuador, and was one of the earliest pre-Columbian cultures of South America. This piece is a votive type object and is shaped as a battle ax, and is a type that is also referred to as a "hacha". This piece was smoothed and polished into the refined form that we see today, and this process was very labor intensive. The surfaces of this piece are very refined, and one can easily see the veins and multi-colored inclusions which enhances it's sacred "raison d'etre". This piece is also a hard serpentine type stone, and it's dark green color was highly prized among many pre-Columbian cultures. A near identical example was offered at Christie's, Paris, Art Pre-Columbian: Collection Felix Et Heidi Stoll ET A Divers Amateurs, April, 2019, no. 8. (1,000.00-1,500.00 Euro estimates. 1,000.00 Euro realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1047632
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This cute piece is a Colima standing warrior that dates circa 150 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches high and is intact, with no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a light red/orange terracotta, and has some minute dark black spotty dendrite deposits. This piece is also a whistle, with an opening at the top and at the back of the hollowed head. The whistle is well made, and makes quite a sharp high-pitched tone. This piece was likely ceremonial, and may have been part of a group ceremony. This type of piece is also known as a "protector" type piece, and is thought to protect the deceased in the afterlife. The standing warrior seen here is nude, and is seen holding the full body length shield with both hands. The shield is leaning against the upper body of the warrior, and only the upper half of his face/head is seen peeking above the upper end of the shield. The design of the curved shield protects a great deal of his body, and it is probable that this stance illustrates the type of warfare that was conducted by the ancient Colima. It is unknown if he is part of a shield wall with many warriors, as was the case of the phalanx formation that was deployed by the ancient Greeks, or if he is simply depicted as an individual warrior in combat. The warrior is also seen wearing a turkey tail feather crest/helmet, and this makes him seem larger than life and more imposing. (A turkey whistle with analogous designed tail feathers, as the crest design seen here, is seen in "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico" by Michael Kan, Los Angeles County Art Museum, 1989, no.169.) An interesting piece that has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Yvette Arnold collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Fl. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact and attractive Daunian askos that dates to the 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10 inches long, by 8.3 inches high, by 9 inches wide through the center of the vessel. This intact piece has no repair/restoration, is in mint "as found" condition, and in addition, it is also a thick-walled ceramic which lends this vessel a great deal of durability. This piece was likely used to hold a liquid such as wine, and was designed for pouring, with the strap handle seen at the top, and the elongated neck at one end of the vessel. There is also an interesting "wavy-line" symbol seen on the piece which may be a representation for water. This piece also has a decorative raised "duck-tail" element at the other end of the vessel, and the entire vessel was likely designed to resemble a sitting duck. This piece also has attractive light brown geometric "line designs" that run around the vessel, and ceramics attributed to the Daunian culture, that was centered in northern Apulia in southern Italy, also resemble earlier Etruscan "Duck-askoi". The piece offered here also has some spotty light tan mineral deposits, along with some attractive root marking. This piece is also slightly larger than what is normally seen, and is a nice example for the type. For a comparable piece see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1983, no. 147. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338257
Apolonia Ancient Art
$935.00
This piece is an Egyptian necklace that is made of 84 individual beads and amulets that date circa 1070-712 B.C., Third Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 19 inches long, and has an added modern 18k gold clasp that makes this piece very wearable. The majority of the beads and amulets are mold made with a light blue glaze, and are faience type beads that have nice minute detail. The smaller beads likely represent small floral seeds, and there are two (2) closed floral amulets, three (3) grape cluster amulets, three (3) closed fist amulets, two (2) small carved white bone Horus Falcon bead amulets, and one (1) central light purple molded lapis lazuli phallic amulet that is a scarce example. These amulets are not only "protector type", but they are also "fertility type" amulets that promote fertility and the cycle of life. The ancient Egyptians always wore and offered amulets to a deity, because he or she believed that it would magically bestow a particular form of protective power. The necklace offered here is made from elements of beads and amulets that were also worn in antiquity, and/or were votive. For an explanation of all the elements and amulets seen in this attractive necklace see; "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. All of the elements and amulets are intact in superb condition, and have no repair and/or restoration. This necklace also has nice eye appeal, has detailed features, and can easily be seen from a distance. This piece also has a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", Dec. 2004, no. 148. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384532
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This powerful piece is an early Moche seated dignitary that dates circa 300-100 B.C., and is approximately 7.2 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has a light brown and dark red glaze. This powerful looking piece is a seated dignitary seen with hands placed on the knees with feet crossed below, wearing an incised cap, and has a furrowed face with large eyes and a grinning mouth. The eyes and mouth have a deep recessed design that was likely once inlaid with mother of pearl or shell, and the face conveys a sacred, but powerful image. The back side of this vessel has a raised stirrup handle that has a dark red glaze, along with the back side of the head. This piece also has a flat bottom, and some spotty dark black mineral deposits and attractive dark brown burnishing. (Another analogous example of this piece was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Jan. 2010, Brussels, no. 104. 4500-6500 Euro estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388636
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This detailed and esoteric piece is a Greek terracotta of a Kore, and dates to the 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand. On the stand it is approximately 5 inches high. This piece was mold made, as it has a flat backside, and is a light orange terracotta. This piece depicts a Greek Kore, whose name means "maiden", and this goddess was responsible for good fortune and the change of the seasons with the "rebirth" of spring, and she was also known as "Persephone". Kore was also a fertility goddess, and is seen here holding her breasts. The face also has a slight smile, almond eyes, and a square chin which are also artistic style hallmarks for the period. This piece also has incised detailing that defines the hands, eyes, and hair locks. The face has a very esoteric look, and this piece has superb artistic style for the period. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Export Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1338146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This attractive flawless Roman glass vessel is an aubergine colored jar that dates circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a deep dark brown/purple color with some light spotty silvered patina both on the inside and outside surfaces. The deep dark brown color is also very desirable, as most Roman glass pieces of this color are much lighter in color. There is also some spotty minute root marking and a multi-colored iridescence seen on various sections of the piece. This piece also has a zigzag trailing decoration (six times up and down) that is seen running around the piece, and connects on the upper shoulder and the outer lip of the vessel. The lip of the vessel also has a rounded trailing piece that runs around the upper lip. This pleasing piece also has four evenly-spaced indented sides, in addition to an indented bottom. These indentations made this piece easier to handle, and allowed the vessel to sit upright. Roman glass vessels of this type with a deep dark brown/purple coloration are also scarce on the market. Another analogous vessel of the same type and size was offered in Chrisite's Antiquities, New York, April 2016, no. 108. ($1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates, $1.375.00 realized. Note: This vessel is also the more common dark green color. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 417. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze knife handle in the shape of an amphora, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches high, by .75 inches wide, by .2 inches thick. This piece is a solid example and was cast as one piece, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is in the shape of a wine amphora, which has two handles attached to the upper shoulder, a fluted neck, and a wide rim. In addition, the lower body of the amphora displays a knobbed base. This piece is also decorated with several "punched concentric circles", which are also seen on both sides of the piece. This decorative element is a hallmark design of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on many bronzes from the period that display flat surfaces. There are also incised lines that cross over the body of the amphora. This attractive piece also served as a knife handle, and iron filling from the missing iron blade can still be seen within the opening at the top of the piece. This piece was likely a shaving razor, or perhaps held a punch tool extension. This piece also has an attractive light to dark green patina, with some spotty dark blue highlights. This piece also fits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. This piece can also be worn and fitted as a pendant, and this may also have been the case in antiquity. Ex: Fortuna Fine arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357255
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This Roman gold earring is a complete example, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately .45 inches in diameter for the hoop, and the facing shield emblem is approximately .38 inches in diameter. This piece weighs 1.1 grams, and is solid gold and is not plated. The facing hemispherical shield emblem seen on this piece is not completely smooth as most examples, as it has hand beaten sculpted lines that run through the shield. The clasp has been tied off as it was worn everyday by the owner in antiquity, but with some adjustments, this piece can easily be worn today. This piece is solid and is very durable as well. A nice intact example that is complete, with no repair and/or restoration. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1385777
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This complete piece is a Roman bronze oil lamp cover in the form of a facing Medusa head, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches in diameter, by .28 inches high in relief. This piece was cast as one solid piece, and has a concave back side and the front side has the facing head of Medusa with long flowing hair. The face is extremely rounded with no facial expression, and has a cloak tie seen below the chin. In addition, there is an indented hole at the top with a bar which served as an opening for a swivel attachment. This piece covered a hole in a bronze oil lamp, and moved up and down over the hole. This piece has a lovely dark green patina, and has very sharp detail, especially with the eyes that have raised hollow pupils that are very noticeable. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a large example for the type. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and also can be worn as a pendant. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
These ten little miniature Corinthian ceramics date circa 600-550 B.C., and are miniature ceramics that are votive in nature. They are approximately .75 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide for the near identical five (5) skyphoi; 1.5 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger skyphos; 1.2 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide for the two kantharos; 1.25 inches high, by 1.8 inches wide for the smaller hydria; and 2.9 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger hydria. One of the kantharos and the larger hydria have a black glaze, and the balance of the pieces have a light tan buff surface, with some added dark brown and light red line design. These miniature pieces are scarce on the market, as they are votive, and reflect a trend in Corinthian pottery production of miniature vessels that seem to have been created exclusively as votives. Their small size precludes any practical use or function, and various examples of skyphoi and other vessel shapes have been found in a variety of sanctuaries and sacred places. These type of pieces have also played a role in the ritual activity at these sites. These pieces are all intact, save for a missing handle on one of the kantharos, and some minute chips seen on the larger hydria. Overall, these ten pieces are a superb group that also has some light mineral deposits and root marking, and best represent a sacred ritual as there are three different ceramic types seen within the group. (Another group of seven pieces was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1987, no. 227. 800-100 pounds estimates.) These pieces also come with a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1247108
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
These two superb bronze plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, and date circa 5th-3rd century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 4.25 inches long by 2.3 inches high, and have an attractive dark brown/black patina with gold gilt and dark red highlights. There is also some minute root marking seen mostly on the back side of each piece, and there is some dark green mineralization seen in sections of each piece as well. Both pieces have very little wear, were likely votive, and were both cast from the lost-wax process, while the wax model was formed in a two-piece mold. These pieces were made as a matching pair, and were possibly attached to a wooden sarcophagus, a burial garment, or the most likely, a leather belt. This type of piece is usually found in pairs, which may also tie in with the "master of the animals" cult that was associated with many cultures in the ancient Near East circa 1000-100 B.C. These plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, which was located in modern day Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. Most Ordos bronzes of this type can also be associated with the Xiongnu, who were a Mongolian steppes nomadic tribe that had to contend with the Chinese during the Han period. The term "Ordos bronzes" has been applied rather indiscriminately to all "animal style" objects found in the vast northern border areas with China, irrespective of place of discovery or dating. What is known is that the two plaques offered here stylistically match other examples found in Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. For the type see "Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes: The Eugene V. Thaw and Other New York Collections", Yale University Press, 2002. The pieces offered here show a standing animal which resembles a wolf, which is seen devouring it's prey, which appears to be a horned ibex. The horned ibex is seen with it's head in the mouth of the wolf, and it's curved horn is seen on the ground, as head of the ibex is seen turned around with a twisted elongated neck. In addition, the ibex may be a young baby animal, which may also explain the size difference between both the ibex and the wolf, but in reality, the ibex portrayed on these plaques may be an adult animal, and the carnivorous wolf may have been designed in an oversized manner to portray a more powerful creature. The wolf may also represent a "spirit animal" and may not be a wolf, but rather a creature that somewhat resembles a wolf or a feline. The creature portrayed here has a curled tail like a feline, and an elongated snout like a wolf, and the creature seen here may be a combination of both animals. The ibex head can also be best seen with the entire piece being viewed upside down, which is a convention of art that is common to the Ordos culture. (See attached close up photo.) This piece also has an attachment hook seen in the top center of the wolf's back, a small hole seen in the tip of the tail, and another hole designed within the ibex horn and front leg. These were the three points as to how this piece could have been attached to a leather belt with leather ties. These plaques have a very powerful image, and may have served as a "power type" piece for the wearer. Additional pieces of this type can be seen in "Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes" by Ariadne Galleries, New York, 1998. The pieces offered here are in superb to mint condition, have a high degree of eye appeal, and are better examples of this type that are normally seen. These pieces also are attached within an attractive black wooden framed shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381928
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This piece is a Chimu blackware feline aryballos that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high, by 5.5 inches wide from ear to ear, and is in flawless intact condition with no repair and/or restoration. This mold made ceramic has a nice deep even black glaze over the entire outer surface, and some spotty white calcite deposits. The black glaze also has some thicker added glaze that forms some linear designs of the feline, and one such design appears to be cat whiskers. This piece has a powerful feline bust that is formed from the main body of the vessel, and the face appears to be snarling at the viewer with a toothy open mouth. This feline likely represents a jaguar, and this vessel is also a "protector" type vessel. The ears are also seen extended from each side, and there is a raised spout seen rising up from the center of the vessel, which defines this vessel type as an "aryballos". This type of vessel was also subsequently produced by the Chimu/Inka, and was their most common vessel type. The ears also have a hole centered within, and this vessel was also likely a "suspension" type vessel, and this along with the raised spout, easily controlled the flow of a liquid such as "chicha". This piece also has a slightly rounded bottom, and easily stands by itself. A ring base is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Roman silver miniature eagle is extremely detailed, is a masterpiece of roman engraving, and dates circa 1st century B.C.- 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356937
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This flawless piece is a Greek Apulian Xenon-ware kylix that dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This lovely little piece is approximately 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has been attributed to the "Red Swan Group" and it is classified as being "Xenon-ware", which is a sub group of "Greek Apulian" ceramics. This piece has a lustrous black glaze with dark orange painted decorative elements, and features a "high footed base ring". The decorative elements include a red swan facing left, within a "double circular tondo", along with two "three dotted" symbols and a single "ivy leaf" symbol. These symbols are commonly seen on Apulian type ceramics, and may signify the artist in one particular workshop and/or the workshop itself. There are also two laurel wreaths seen on the piece, with one on the inner surface that frames the inner "double circular tondo", and another on the outer surface that runs around the piece. The two handles attached to the piece are upturned, and have some minute stress cracks which is normal for a ceramic of this type, and have no visual repair/restoration. The surfaces have some minute cracking which is also normal, and some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel. The surface also has a preservative wax, which lends this attractive piece it's glossy appearance as well. Overall, an exceptional piece and a high quality example. (An analogous example of the same quality and size was sold by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 396. $1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see Margaret Mayo, "The Art of South Italy, Vases from Magna Graecia", Richmond, Virginia, 1982, no. 160. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic black-glazed lekythos that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This piece is in mint condition, with no repair/restoration, and is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This piece is near gem quality, as the lustrous deep black glaze is nearly flawless, and the surface of this piece has an even deep black color with a thin multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a beautiful esoteric design, with a gadrooned body with a pattern of incised grooves in the handle zone, and a small rouletted molding at the junction of the shoulder and the flared neck. This piece also has a small flat foot, and a black dotted circle underneath on the bottom. The overall design of this piece also has a geometric esthetic, as the height is equal to the diameter. The flared neck was also designed for greater control pouring the liquid that was held within, and this was likely a precious oil, and the short neck design also made pouring liquid from this vessel very precise as well. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2002, no. 243. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, approximately 3.5 inches high. See attached photo.) An additional analogous vessel was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2006, no. 134. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $3,750.00 realized.) This type of Greek Attic black-glaze ceramic is scarce in this exceptional condition, and is rarely seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1119679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare ancient Greek coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted by Seleukos I, circa 305-290 B.C., weighs approximately 15.8 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/Good Very Fine condition (EF/VF+). Seleukos I was a general under Alexander the Great, and established his capital in Babylon circa 305 B.C. Seleukos was subsequently able to recover the Asian possessions of Alexander by winning military victories over some of the other former generals of Alexander the Great. The obverse of the rare coin offered here has the head of Herakles facing right, seen wearing a lion's skin head dress; and the reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle. The name of Seleukos is seen behind the seated Zeus, and before, is the forepart of a horse and an anchor symbol which are both mint marks of Seluekos I. This coin was minted in Ecbatana, which was the summer residence of the Persian kings, and is modern day Hamadan in western Iran. This coin was classified in "Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton", by Arthur Houghton, American Numismatic Society, New York, 1983, as being from the Ecbatana mint and minted within the same series as nos. 1128 & 1129, Pl. 67. The coin type seen here is a continuation of the "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage of Alexander the Great which had been inaugurated during his lifetime, and Seleukos I simply substituted his name from that of Alexander, and added his mint mark symbols. One added difference is that the head of Herakles seen on the obverse, may be a deified portrait of Alexander who died in Babylon circa 323 B.C., as the eye clearly is designed in an upturned manner, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of portraiture that is intended to show a deified god. In addition, the obverse shows a slight fleshy lump above the nose and lower forehead which Alexander was thought to have developed in the latter stages of his life. The choice of Seleukos continuing the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type of coinage, also tied Seleukos I closer to Alexander, and helped to legitimize his rule in Asia. This coin is a rare type, as classified in the "Celebrated Collection of Coins formed by the late Richard C. Lockett, Greek, Part IV, Glendining & Co., London, 1961, no. 2548, Pl. XV. This coin is very different than the bulk of the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage, because rather than portraying Herakles on the obverse, this coin type portrays not only Herakles, but also Alexander the Great as a god. There are very few obverse dies that show Herakles with the upturned eye as well, and this was a development in ancient Greek Hellenistic coinage that is seen only after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C. Ex: Spink & Son, London, circa 1960's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1366079
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb piece is a Greek Mycenaean bronze dagger that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1190 B.C. This complete example is approximately 4.9 inches long, by 1.3 inches wide at the lower tang shoulder, and has no repair/restoration. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute and spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is also classified as being the "Cruciform Type, Variant A", and has a flat blade without a midrib, slightly beveled edges, and an elliptical cross section. There is also a rounded lower tang shoulder, and the blade gradually moves down to a point. The design of the flat blade without a midrib, also allowed for an area on the blade that provided for the design of inlayed scenes that were made of precious materials such as gold and silver. Daggers such as the example offered here are scarce to rare, as most weapons with this design are much larger short swords. This piece also has two pin support holes, and one pin is still seen inserted into the piece. Many of these examples were also excavated at Mycenae, and the piece offered here was made during the height of Mycenaean expansion. A nice complete piece not often seen on the market. (For the type see "The Greek Age of Bronze", at www.salimbeti.com/micenei/weapons1.htm. A photo of a line drawing for the type from page 50 is attached.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1215119
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This piece is a Mayan terracotta that dates from the Late Classic period, circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 6 inches high by 7.5 inches wide by 4.5 inches deep. This piece has powerful eye appeal, as it shows the Mexican rain god Tlaloc with large round eyes, scrolled upper lip, and exposed tooth row. This complete piece is a very large applique that was part of a extremely large vessel which may have had several of these applied appliques that ran around the outside of the vessel. There is original white pigment seen over the exposed teeth and round eyes, root marking seen in sections of the piece, and there are light brown and gray earthen deposits seen over the entire piece. The condition of this piece is intact, with little apparent crack fill, and this piece appears to have broken cleanly away from the main body of the vessel. A wall section of this large vessel also forms the backside of the piece offered here. The mix of Mexican and Mayan motifs in the Late Classic period is not uncommon, and another example of a Mayan terracotta with the Mexican rain god Tlaloc can be seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The Saint Louis Art Museum Collections" by Lee Parsons, New York, 1980, no. 318, p. 205. The Mexican rain god Tlaloc has also appeared since the Early Classic period in the Maya zone, and is often related to scenes of "autosacrifice" involving the nobility, in which they self extract and offer their own blood. This "blood letting ceremony", as an offering to the gods, is also a metaphor for rain, although the Maya had their own rain deity, Chaac. The piece offered here may also have been part of a large ceremonial blood letting vessel. In relation to the letting of blood, the Tlaloc deity also appears on war shields, as seen on Mayan terracotta figures. This piece is scarce to rare, and sits on a custom black metal stand. Ex: E. Duncan collection, Stilwell, Kansas, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1400339
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This detailed and realistic Roman bronze of a horse head dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.75 inches high, by .65 inches wide from ear to ear. This piece is in superb to mint quality condition, and has a beautiful dark green emerald patina. This piece is the complete raised handle of a Roman bronze lamp, and is an exceptional example for the type, as the head is very realistic and has added detailing that one normally doesn't see regarding a Roman bronze of this type. This piece is seen with an incised main, detailed eyes, raised nostrils, and extended ears that are forward facing. The face of this horse also appears to have a different expression on each side, as the mouth and eyes are rendered slightly different on each side. This piece is a very interesting Roman bronze with superior workmanship, and is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1370697
Apolonia Ancient Art
Call For Price
This mint quality Greek Illyrian helmet dates circa 6th century B.C., and is approximately 12 inches high, from the top of the crest box to the tip of the cheek pieces, and it is a full size example. This beautiful piece has been classified in "Antike Helm", Lipperheide and Antikenmuseums Collections, Mainz, Germany, 1988, pp. 59-64, as being "Type II, Var.B". This piece is in flawless, mint condition, and has no repair/restoration, and is one of the best examples on the global market. This piece has slightly elongated cheek pieces, a detailed punched decorative dotted band that runs around the outer perimeter edge, and a well-defined crest box. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze, and the crest box was added into the construction of the helmet, not only to define an attachment area for the crest which was likely made from bird quills, but also to give extra strength to the main body of the piece. The added crest box also was designed to protect the warrior from overhead blows. There is also a slightly extended neck guard which is finely made as well. This exceptional example also has some very minor horizontal scraps and nicks which is also an indication that this piece was in battle. This piece has a compact and attractive design, and is one of the top examples for the type. In addition, this piece has an exceptional dark green patina with dark blue highlights which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. The patina seen on this attractive piece is also in "as found" condition, and this helmet has not been over cleaned as most examples. This piece also comes with a custom metal display stand. Ex Axel Guttmann collection, Inventory no. 517, Berlin, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Dallas, Texas collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
On Hold
This attractive Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is extra large in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1382661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek terracotta applique of a god, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide, and is a complete example that was mounted on the wall of a ceramic or a handle. On the custom Plexiglas display stand, this piece has a total height of approximately 6 inches high. The wall of the ceramic and/or handle is seen on the backside of the piece, and this piece was mold made, and then was subsequently applied to the vessel. This complete piece has no restoration and/or repair, and has some minute earthen deposits. This powerful piece is a nice applique portrait of a god who is likely a young Herakles, as he is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress, has upturned curled hair, and a young face. The portrait may also double for a young Alexander the Great, as there are many representations from antiquity of Alexander that are of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1375947
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These pieces are nineteen (19) Egyptian faience glazed amulets that are from the Amarna-Period, Late New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, circa 1350 B.C., and also date to the reign of Akhenaten and Tutankhamun. These interesting and attractive pieces range in size from approximately .9 to .25 inches high, and are all intact, save one plaque amulet that has a chip on one side. Nine (9) of the amulets have a minute suspension hoop at the top, and were likely strung together on a necklace or interwoven into a garment. The remaining amulets were likely interwoven and/or wrapped into a garment, and may have also been interwoven into the wrappings of a mummy, as this was likely the case for all of the amulets offered here. The amulets vary in type, glaze color, and size which makes them a very interesting study group. A lotus flower, a palmette, a Wedjat-eye, a seated Sekhmet, and a Hes-Vase represent some of the examples offered here. Many of these amulet types are seen in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. The mold made amulets offered here also range in color from a bright blue glaze to a dark purple-blue color. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367369
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This vibrant Nazca globular vessel dates to the Middle Nazca Period, circa 300-600 A.D., and is approximately 10 inches high, by 9 inches in diameter through the center of the piece. This piece has very vibrant dark red, orange, cream, black, white, and light aquamarine colors. This piece was painted over a light brown/tan clay, and has perfect globular symmetry in it's creation. This attractive piece has a flat "basket handle" that covers the top opening, and this opening also has an esoteric flared lip. This piece is also larger than other examples of this type, and is a type not often seen relative to Nazca ceramics. This piece features a powerful image of a "spirit god", which has also been termed a "demon-feline god", and this god has a mirror image of itself seen on each half of the vessel. (For an explanation of this composite god see "Culturas Precolumbinas Nazca", by J. Antonio de Lavalle", Lima, 1986.) This "spirit god" has a facing head with open and noticeable white eyes, a linear open mouth with a tongue protruding, a multi-colored and segmented necklace, and trailing legs with a textile cape that has two attached trophy heads and a facing head at the end. This figure also appears to be in flight, and is an excellent representation of a god in the spirit world. A major theme of Nazca ceramic art features complex figures with feline faces and human trophy-heads probably alluding to war, the taking of heads, and the use of blood offerings to earth, sky, and water. Similarly dressed figures may also have appeared in ceremonial rites. This piece was repaired from several fragments, as is usually the case relative to large-scale Nazca ceramics, and is approximately 98% original. A nice large piece with very powerful and vibrant iconography. This powerful piece also comes with a clear Plexiglas ring base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, no. 28R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1346703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze amulet that is seen in the form of the Greek goddess Baubo, and dates circa 5th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high by .65 inches wide, and is a complete example with no restoration/repair. This complete piece has a nice dark green patina with some light brown deposits, and is a solid cast example that likely served as a wearable amulet that hung from a necklace. This piece has a suspension hoop seen at the top of the head of the goddess, who is seen nude with her hands on her knees, and is revealing her over-sized vulva. The goddess Baubo was a fun-loving, bawdy, jesting, sexually liberated - yet very wise - goddess who played a crucial role in preserving the fertility of the land in ancient Greece. According to ancient Greek myth, Baubo stopped to rest in the city of Eleusis and had a conversation with the depressed Demeter, who was in deep mourning over the loss of her daughter Persephone who was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter abandoned her duties to bring fertility back to the land, until Baubo began chatting with Demeter using risqué remarks that brought a smile back to Demeter's face. Then, Baubo suddenly lifted her skirt revealing her vulva to Demeter who responded with a hearty belly laugh. Demeter's spirits were uplifted, and she was then able to persuade Zeus to release Persephone, which restored the fertility of the land. The piece offered here may have been worn by a woman, and/or a person who was also connected with the Eleusinian Mysteries. The followers of Baubo believed that enmity could be turned into friendship, and that all people are an integral part of the great cycles of nature. This piece is a scarce to rare example, and is a solid example that can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304124
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is a silver Greco-European "spectacle fibula" that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1.4 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece was made from one hammered strand of silver, and was made by creating a wire spiral that begins and ends at the center of each spiral. This piece is also very solid, as the diameter of the silver strand is about 1/16 inch on the average. The area between both spirals forms a clip that likely held rolls of hair in place, so this piece served as a functional, as well as a decorative type of piece. This piece has an attractive light gray patina, along with some minute spotty dark green mineral deposits seen mostly on "Side B" of the piece. (An analogous example was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2012, no. 218, 500-600 Pound estimates.) Silver examples of this type are relatively scarce on the market, especially in the intact condition offered here. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381605
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is a Chancay canteen type vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 9 inches wide, by 4.5 inches thick through the main body of the vessel. This piece is a scarce "black-on-red" Chancay canteen vessel, as the majority of Chancay vessels are "black-on-cream" type vessels, and tend to be rather thin walled. The piece offered here is very durable, as it has thick walls, although it was a mold-made type vessel. This piece has attractive black geometric patterns seen on a red background on both sides of the vessel, and a raised rounded spout at the top, that also has the face and head of a god built into the spout. The face of the god appears to have tattoos, and has a very prominent nose. The handles of the vessel also double as arms, and there appears to be black painted hands seen at the top of each handle where it meets the spout. The god seen here may depict a Chancay "water-god", as this culture existed in a very arid region in ancient Peru. This intact piece is also in superb condition, with no repair and/or restoration, and has vibrant colors. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note this piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1392094
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This lively piece is a Parthian/Near Eastern bronze leaping lion handle, and dates circa 150 B.C.-225 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches long, by 3.8 inches high, as seen on it's custom display stand. This piece is also complete, with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast as one solid piece. The lively lion seen here has his head turned to the right, and appears to look back at the individual who can easily hold this piece firmly with one hand. The lion is also seen with his mouth open, and appears to be roaring at the viewer. The lion is also seen leaping, and his two front paws were designed to fit over the rim of a vessel, as there is also a groove under the paws. This piece is a rare example, and is likely Parthian, as the artistic style of this piece is very analogous to other works of art attributed to this culture. (For another analogous example attributed to the Parthian period that is of the exact size and type, see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals. The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European Art.", Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, no. 659. See attached photos.) This piece also has a beautiful dark brown and green patina, and is mounted on a custom marble display stand. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356647
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice Roman bronze is an eagle applique that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.2 inches high, by 2 inches high. This piece is a very detailed Roman eagle that has a raised head and spread wings. The wings are very detailed, and have very fine feather "line design". The head is designed with the head facing right, and is seen looking at the viewer. There is also detail on the head not facing the viewer, and there is a very defined "dotted eye". This piece has a flat back, and there is an extended mounting pin seen in the back center. This piece likely served as an applique for a vessel, and may have served as a decorative element in a legionary phalera, or an element in Roman armor. The military application relative to this piece is readily apparent, as the Roman eagle was the Roman symbol of the power, and was presented in many art forms within the Roman army. This attractive piece is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some minute red highlights, and is a fine example for the type. Another analogous example was offered by Bonham's Antiquities, London, July 1995, no. 442. (500-600 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The nice piece offered here is also mounted on a custom display base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Concordia Art, Las Vegas, NV., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,800.00
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful and even dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. (See attached photo.) The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. This piece is extremely rare, and so much so, it has also been labeled as "Teotino culture" by some pre-Columbian experts. In addition, this piece has been published as "Nazca (?) culture" by the Sakler Foundation, and has had extensive academic research and testing by their pre-Columbian academics, including Elizabeth Benson and Paul Clifford. The description of this published piece offered here, therefore follows the Sakler academic description as: Nasca (?), Peru, South Coast. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, circa 1970's, accession no. N-110. Published: "Art of the Andes", (As noted above), 1983, no. 143. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1374604
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This type of piece has been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans, and has also been attributed to a later time frame as being Parthian, as well as Sassanian, because the material and construction techniques of this piece are all attributed to this region and these cultures. This attractive piece is made from a beautiful white and dark brown banded agate stone that is mounted in a gold frame. This attractive frame is also made from a flat plate with seven added granular triangle designs, and an outer and inner twisted gold rope rim band. The back side of the gold frame encloses the sides of the agate stone, and firmly holds it into place. There is also a hoop at the back, as this piece likely hung within a necklace that had additional pieces of this type, and may have been the central component of the overall necklace. A complete necklace of this type is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. (This piece is published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, no. 159. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is scarce to rare for the type, and is seldom seen on the market in this natural "as found" condition. This piece is also very durable, and can easily be worn today. This beautiful piece also hangs on it's custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Davis and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This powerful piece is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and likely depicts the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This portrait bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right, as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece is likely a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can also be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This portrait bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as also seen in the bronze portrait bust offered here. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights, and sits on a custom display stand. Ex: New York private collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1359731
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze slashing sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This remarkable piece is approximately 21.4 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide at the point where the blade meets the shank of the weapon. This piece was hand forged into one piece from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This powerful weapon also has a blade that slightly graduates in width from the shank to the blunt end, and this blade section of the weapon is slightly curved. The straight rectangle shaped "extended shaft" is also very durable, and is approximately .5 inches wide at the shank, by .25 inches thick. This weapon's "extended shaft" also slightly graduates in size, mostly with the width, from the shank to the end of the handle. The cutting edge of the blade is also only on one side, as the blunt end is flat, along with the top side of the blade. Overall, this weapon is very finely made for the period, and has subtle dimensions of construction which makes it a very special and specialized work of ancient arms. This weapon was designed to slash through an enemy with one sweeping motion, and an extended "wooden shaft handle" would have allowed this weapon to be held with one or two hands. This design also allowed this weapon to likely be able to penetrate heavy armor such as a helmet or a breastplate, as the "extended shaft" attached to an extended "wooden shaft handle" would allow one to generate a tremendous amount of force. This weapon may also have been designed for use from a chariot or horseback, as the owner would be able to slash in a downwards motion, which would have generated even more force than a horizontal slash. This weapon may also be of a type that was used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with some red highlights, and some spotty light to dark green mineralization. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and has an ever so slight bend at the shank which may indicate that this piece was in battle. This weapon is extremely rare, is a highly specialized work of ancient arms, and is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360510
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This nice Egyptian swivel ring dates to the Second Intermediate Period, circa 1650-1549 B.C., and is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter and was made for an adult male. This piece is in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. The stone has no cracks or chips, and the overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality. This piece has an attractive green-black steatite stone that swivels around a wire that runs through the piece. This piece has a clever design, in that the wire that runs through the extremely dense steatite stone, is wrapped around a bronze hoop at each end of the stone. The overall design of the ring is very esoteric, and the ring with the raised steatite stone is very noticeable on one's finger. The bronze hoop also has a pleasing dark brown-green patina with some minute red highlights. The attractive green-black steatite stone was highly polished in antiquity, and it still retains a great deal of it's brilliant luster. The stone also has a thin multi-colored iridescence that is seen on both the upper rounded side, and the flat bottom side. This ring is durable enough that it can easily be worn today, and the stone also swivels freely around the inner wire. A nice Egyptian ring that is a high quality example. A black ring display stand is also included. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private new York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,185.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is a thick walled example, and is also a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are in fact, an added plus towards the value of the piece. This attractive piece has an exceptional dark green patina with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is very desirable, due to the reasons noted above, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze, and was hammered into shape and the form we see today. This piece was finished with detailed repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "Classical Period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian Empire) deep bowls. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great, who subsequently paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece also comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980.s-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek coin is a Superb grade (EF+/EF), Achaian League silver triobol/hemidrachm, that dates circa 196-146 B.C. This superbly graded piece is well centered, is approximately 18 mm wide, and weighs 2.49 grams. This coin shows the bearded bust of Zeus facing right (Obv.) within a dotted border, and the Achaian League monogram (Rev.) within a wreath, with a club of Herakles above, and minute lettering (IY) seen to the left. This coin has exceptional artistic style, as the bust of Zeus has very fine detail with realistic features. This coin may also have been minted in Argos, which was one of the many cities that comprised the Achaian league in the northern and central Peloponnese. The League was also the foremost state in Greece after the eclipse of Macedonian power, and in 146 B.C., the League declared war on Rome, which resulted in the complete destruction of the League and the sack of Corinth, it's chief city. The coin offered here is rare in this grade, as most examples are Very Fine (VF) in condition. Ex: Frank Kovaks collection, San Francisco, CA., circa 1980's. References: Sear 2984. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288982
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare coin is a Greek bronze (22mm) that was minted in the ancient Greek city of Amphaxitis, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 196-168 B.C. This piece is graded VF+/EF-, weighs 7.5 gms, and is one of the few best quality examples that have been recorded. This piece shows on the Obverse: The bearded bust of Herakles facing right, with his club seen behind his head, within a dotted border; and the Reverse: The club of Herakles, with the name of the city in Greek lettering seen above and below, all within an olive wreath. This piece also has a nice thick and even dark green/blue patina, and is a superb example for this rare issue. Amphaxitis was a Greek trading city which was approximately 50 kilometers north of the modern city of Thessaloniki. This city facilitated trade between the Greeks on the coast of Macedonia, and the Thraco-Macedonian tribes on the interior. The city was subsequently settled by veterans of the army of Alexander the Great. Sear 1376. BMC 5.1,2. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402085
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality Etruscan vessel is a two-handled kotyle type vessel, and dates to the Late Geometric Period, circa 7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a slightly indented rim, two applied strap handles, and a ring base with a flat bottom. This piece was made from a light tan terracotta, and has a light orange/red slip with a banded design seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece also has some spotty light brown and white calcite mineral deposits, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece is an exceptional example for the type, and the Geometric Period banded design is very attractive. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338758
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This large piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 5.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This scarce piece has a nice even dark gray patina with spotty dark black highlights, and in addition, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from four separate parts: the main "mastos type" cup body, the cast stem base, and the two (2) applied strap handles. The main body is a 'mastos type" cup design, and pieces of this type are often seen and offered on the market as a singular cup. This mastos cup, that doubles as the main body of this vessel, was hand beaten and spun on a lathe into the oval shape that is now seen. The upper lip has an attractive indented surface below the lip that is an esoteric design that took a great deal of skill to produce. The cast stem base was added at the bottom center, and the two applied handles were applied possibly in antiquity some years after this stemmed vessel was produced. It is also possible that the stem base and the two handles were added together in antiquity as well, which produced an elegant table vessel that could stand by itself. The two applied strap handles also have attractive "cross hatching" designs that were hammered into the outer surfaces. This superb piece is intact, and there are some minor scratches, some minor dents, and root marking which is normal for a vessel of this type, and these features also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The "mastos type" body is also defined by D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 107-109, Fig. 24. (The piece offered here is a "deep conical type" as seen in Fig. 24, no. a. See attached photo.) The piece offered here not only is a scarce type that has an esoteric design, but it also has great eye appeal and was expensive to produce in antiquity. A silver vessel of this type could only have been on the table of a wealthy individual. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388722
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Greek terracotta of a nude Aphrodite, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.75 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas stand. On the stand it is approximately 8 inches high. This esoteric piece was mold made, and was finished with detailed sculpting. This piece is a nude Aphrodite that is portrayed emerging from her bath, and this beautiful piece was modeled after the renowned 4th century B.C. masterpiece known as the Cnidian Aphrodite by Praxiteles, who in portraying the goddess as she emerges from her bath, epitomized the ancient ideal of feminine sensuality. Kozloff and Mitten commented in "The Gods delight, The Human Figure in Classical Bronze, p. 106", that the universal attraction of this pose can be summarized in the psychology of the experience from that of the viewer, in that: "the viewer became, in essence, a voyeur, allowed to behold something that was at once enticing and forbidden." Kozloff further elaborates: "from each point of view, a special aspect of her beauty is stressed; the face from the left, the buttocks from the back, the breasts from the right, and the pelvis from the front. Her gestures are decorous, and her pose is convincingly self-protective." The Aphrodite offered here is also seen crouched down while looking away to see if she was seen emerging from her bath. Her hair is also pulled back into a bun, which is also very detailed. Her nude body is also perfectly molded, and there are few Hellenistic Greek terracottas that are completely nude, as most are draped to some degree. This piece is also intact and is complete, save for sections of her missing arms and her lower extremities. Overall, this esoteric piece is of a type that is seldom seen on the market, and displays exceptional artistic style. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: