Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1162134
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,235.00
This interesting piece is an Aztec flint blade which dates circa 1400-1525 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches high by 2.5 inches wide, and is a large example for the type. This piece is intact, save for a minute chip at one end, and has a beautiful light brown patina with some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece has a small hole near the center of the piece, and this hole is full of minute crystals which are imbedded in the inner cavity, and run to the outer edge of the hole on each side of the piece. It's quite possible that the small hole with crystals was formed from constant mineral drippings, as this piece may have been a ceremonial offering that was buried in a cave or underground tomb. It is interesting to note that the crystals not only extend to the outer edge on each side of the hole, but also over both edges on each side of the piece, and onto the outer carved/chipped planes of the outer flat surfaces near the edge of each side of the hole. This is an indication that the crystal mineralization, and the hole seen on this piece, developed after this piece was carved and buried. The patina and the mineralization are also excellent indicators which go far in establishing the authenticity of this piece, and there are many forgeries of this type of piece that have been on the market. The carving of this piece is exceptional and very well detailed as well, as one can easily see that the carved/chipped planes become smaller towards the edge of the piece, and this forms a blade of elliptical form that has extremely sharp edges. Aztec blades of this type have been used as a lance or knife blade, but the piece offered here was likely used only in a votive context. The flint stone of this piece is also semi-translucent, and according to Eduardo Matos Moctezuma in "The Great Temple of the Aztecs: Treasures of Tenochtitlan", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1988, p. 97: "Many objects of flint and obsidian, locally available raw materials, were also made by the Aztec artisans to be deposited in caches. Flint was most frequently chipped into knives and blades. Some of these knives were decorated with with bits of shell and stone mosaic to form little faces in profile, resembling representations of the flint day sign in the Borbonicus. Similarly, obsidian (a volcanic glass) was chipped to form knives and blades with sharp cutting edges, but it was also carefully worked and polished into miniature imitations, such as small heads and rattles of the rattlesnake. Obsidian is an extremely dense and glassy stone, and is a difficult material to work; such miniatures attest to the skill of the Aztec craftsmen. While flint and obsidian implements symbolically and functionally evoke sacrifice and death, more overt evidence of ritual acts can be found in the numerous examples of worked crania. Sometimes a flint knife is placed between the teeth, like a tongue projecting from a grinning mouth, at other times another knife is inserted into the nasel cavity to create an animated image of death. We do not know wheather these objects were used as masks in rituals, or wheather they were made as symbols of death and sacrifice to be placed in offerings." (See attached photo from the text above, p. 98, ill. 80, of a skull mask with two analogous flint blades such as the example offered here.) The piece offered here was likely cermonial and was votive, but in exactly what context it was used, that is not certain, but whatever the case, the piece offered here is an extremely interesting and rare example of the type. This piece also comes with a custom wooden display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private North Carolina collection, circa 1990's. Ex: H. Rose collection, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1295159
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,675.00
This rare piece is a Roman bronze figurine that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This impressive piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This complete piece also has an even beautiful dark blue/green patina with spotty red highlights, and is in excellent condition with no noticeable breaks or chips. This piece is seen standing with the full weight on the left leg, and the other leg is slightly bent while the body is seen slightly leaning to the right. This piece also stands by itself, and is placed on a custom stand for added stability. This piece has extremely refined facial detail, and there are other minute details seen on this piece such as the design of the sandals. The figure seen here may also depict Alexander the Great, as it displays many attributes that are known for this dynamic Greek figure from antiquity. Although this piece is a Roman bronze, the Greek features seen on this piece are unmistakable, such as the Greek muscled cuirass which is worn over the Greek knee-length "chiton", the attached cape "chlamys" which falls behind, and the pose of the figure that is seen with the weight on one leg. In addition, this figure has upswept curls above the forehead known as an "anastole" hair style, along with thick locks of leonine hair, deep set eyes, an angular jaw, and a prominent brow which are all facial features of Alexander the Great. This figure is also seen extending his right arm, and the open upturned hand likely held a missing round "phiale", which held wine that was used for sacrificial offerings to the Gods. This military figure also appears to be in the act of offering wine sacrifice to the Gods, and this type of wine sacrifice using a "phiale" was purely a Greek religious rite, rather than a Roman ritual. It's possible that this figurine reminded the owner in Roman times of Alexander's visit to Troy, as he was the new Achilles - the champion of the Greeks and, as Achilles had done 1,000 years before, he sacrificed in the temple of Athena. Wealthy and cultivated Romans would often engage the topic of Alexander's notable personality, his superhuman accomplishments, and the human fate with their philosophical discourses. It would not be surprising to find his image in the intimacy of a domestic villa. The famous Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum contained a whole collection of several bronze busts representing Greek Hellenistic rulers, Greek poets, and philosophers, which serves as an eloquent example of the cultural preferences of the Roman elite. This figurine also appears to be grasping a Roman sword known as a "gladius", which had a rounded pummel as seen here. The Roman general Marcus Antony also favored Greek dress as seen on this figurine, and this piece may also represent a "duality of portraiture", in that it is a combination of Greek and Roman attributes, and may represent more than one famous individual and/or military leader. What is certain relative to this rare figurine, is that this figure is both a military and religious figure, and this combination is best displayed in the figurine offered here. (Another analogous example of a Roman bronze figurine in the guise of Alexander the Great, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. Approximately 3.75 inches high, circa 1st-3rd century A.D., and complete. $47,500.00 fixed price. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This mint quality and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. The facial features of this appealing piece have fine detail, and also have a rather haunting and mysterious look. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide rim seen on this vessel allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid, and served as a palette for the liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #678982
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a bronze geometric horse that was cast in one solid piece. This attractive piece was made during the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high by 2.8 inches long. This piece is extremely early for the culture, and this can be seen relative to the artistic style with the elongated neck. This piece was probably part of a sacred necklace that may have been votive, and may have been shamanistic in nature. The stylized horse seen here may have been created as a "spirit" type animal, and this may explain the design. The design of the piece is also an early Geometric Period convention of art, and during this period, animals were designed with legs, tails, and necks that were elongated and thin. This piece also has a hoop seen on the top part of the body that connected this piece to the main body of the necklace by a chain. The hoop seen on the top part of the body may also have been broken in antiquity in order to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece, and consequently, this piece may also have been votive. There were probably several animals and/or amulets connected to this type of necklace in antiquity, and the geometric horse pendant offered here is analogous to a piece that is now seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome (Inventory no. 53438, listed as being found at Palestrina, dated circa 8th-6th century B.C.). The bronze animals seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia example are also approximately one third of the size of the piece offered here. The Museo di Villa Giulia piece is a complete necklace, and has long-necked horse pendants, and small round shields that are individually connected to the necklace by attachment chains. The extremely rare piece offered here has a dark green patina with dark red highlights, and the dark red highlights are due to a high concentration of tin within the mix of metals. This piece is complete, except for the incomplete hoop, and it sits into the grooves of a clear custom plexiglas display stand. (Another rare analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, and was published in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 58, $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: F. Hirsch collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to culture, date, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1385777
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This complete piece is a Roman bronze oil lamp cover in the form of a facing Medusa head, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches in diameter, by .28 inches high in relief. This piece was cast as one solid piece, and has a concave back side and the front side has the facing head of Medusa with long flowing hair. The face is extremely rounded with no facial expression, and has a cloak tie seen below the chin. In addition, there is an indented hole at the top with a bar which served as an opening for a swivel attachment. This piece covered a hole in a bronze oil lamp, and moved up and down over the hole. This piece has a lovely dark green patina, and has very sharp detail, especially with the eyes that have raised hollow pupils that are very noticeable. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a large example for the type. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and also can be worn as a pendant. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1390809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This rare piece is a Roman glass and turquoise pendant that dates to the 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately 1.7 inches in diameter, by .35 inches thick. This piece is an exquisitely carved turquoise roundel with a laureate and cuirassed young male deity that is seen facing right. This roundel is also framed in a green glass bezel, and has a small hole for suspension seen at the top. The backside of this piece is also flat, and the glass bezel is very translucent which also adds to it's beautiful eye appeal. The glass also has sections of a thick multi-iridescent patina, and some root marking. The young male deity seen on this piece may also represent a Roman emperor seen as a god. This piece was also an object with a great deal of eye appeal in antiquity, and was meant to be seen. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bank Leu Numismatik, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 2000's. (Note additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394151
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This spiritual piece is a Huari double-spout vessel that dates circa 800-1000 A.D., and is approximately 6.2 inches high, by 5.4 inches in diameter. This piece is painted with vibrant colors in reddish-brown, cream, gray, and black colors. This piece shows a flying avain (parrot?) on each side, and is seen over a reddish-brown background. The bottom half of this vessel is painted with a dark gray color, along with the two raised spouts. This type of vessel is also known as a "bridge type" vessel, as there is a handle that is seen between both of the raised spouts. This piece is a "spiritual type" vessel, as the avains portrayed appear to be in flight, and/or are seen in the spirit world. The design of the piece also has geometric line design, and this is also an artistic hallmark of this culture. The main body of this vessel is intact, save for the bridge handle that was re-attached to both of the raised spouts, and this repair appears to be quite old, and was likely done 25 plus years ago. The thick glaze on this vessel is also intact, save for one side that has some minor losses. Overall, this vessel is in extremely fine condition, and is a nice example for the type. An analogous example was sold in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 257A. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,610 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that the piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Boeotian black glazed kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This large piece is approximately 10 inches high, by 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous vibrant black glaze seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of this vessel, and features added white decorative elements that are seen running around the vessel. These prominent decorative elements are ivy leaf tendrils, along with a chevron pattern that is seen below. The chevron pattern is also a rare decorative element, and this piece is one of the few known examples that features this element. This piece also has distinctive looped "strap handles" that raise gracefully above the main body of the vessel, and a raised "stem base". This large vessel was likely used for holding wine, and was used for drinking and/or for pouring libations in a religious ceremony. The ivy leaf decorative elements seen on this piece are also tied to Dionysus, who was the Greek god of wine and revelry. In addition, this type of vessel is often portrayed on painted pottery being held by Satyrs, who were bestial goat-men that were associated with drinking and Dionysian festivals. This piece is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. There are some minute stress cracks seen on the strap handles, but these are very minor and are difficult to see, and this vessel is a solid example which can be held today. There is also some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and the entire piece has a beautiful even lustrous black glaze. Most vessels of this type usually have a great deal of repair/restoration, and significant losses to the white painted decorative elements, but this is not the case with this exceptional and intact example, and this piece is also one of the best recorded examples. This piece is also analogous to the example found in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, no. 1993.197. Another piece of this type, size, and condition was sold in Christie's Antiquities, London, oct. 2011, no. 71. (3,000.00-5,000.00 Pound estimates, 6,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian skyphos with olive painted design, approximately 2.25 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1047632
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This cute piece is a Colima standing warrior that dates circa 150 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches high and is intact, with no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a light red/orange terracotta, and has some minute dark black spotty dendrite deposits. This piece is also a whistle, with an opening at the top and at the back of the hollowed head. The whistle is well made, and makes quite a sharp high-pitched tone. This piece was likely ceremonial, and may have been part of a group ceremony. This type of piece is also known as a "protector" type piece, and is thought to protect the deceased in the afterlife. The standing warrior seen here is nude, and is seen holding the full body length shield with both hands. The shield is leaning against the upper body of the warrior, and only the upper half of his face/head is seen peeking above the upper end of the shield. The design of the curved shield protects a great deal of his body, and it is probable that this stance illustrates the type of warfare that was conducted by the ancient Colima. It is unknown if he is part of a shield wall with many warriors, as was the case of the phalanx formation that was deployed by the ancient Greeks, or if he is simply depicted as an individual warrior in combat. The warrior is also seen wearing a turkey tail feather crest/helmet, and this makes him seem larger than life and more imposing. (A turkey whistle with analogous designed tail feathers, as the crest design seen here, is seen in "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico" by Michael Kan, Los Angeles County Art Museum, 1989, no.169.) An interesting piece that has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Yvette Arnold collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Fl. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: