Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1394722
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Greek rhyton that dates to the mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 9.5 inches long, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the rim. This well-defined piece was formed from a mold, and is a light tan terracotta that has a spotty light black glaze with some dark to light brown burnishing. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. The detailed ram's head at the terminal end of this attractive piece has a very defined snout, eyes, and horns. There is also a single looped strap handle under the flared rim, and a small pin hole is seen at the end of the snout. This feature is also an indication that this piece was a votive type piece, and was made so the departed could toast the gods. This vessel also has concentric serrated ridges that run around the main body of the vessel, and this was an aid in grasping this vessel with one hand, as this was a drinking vessel. Greek drinking cups of this type were very popular and were used for banquets, weddings, and drinking parties. There were all sorts of shapes for them - bulls, goats, dogs, and the ram as seen here. Regardless of the type, not many ceramic rhyton vessels have been found on the market, and most surviving examples were most likely votive in nature. Another analogous example of this type and size is from the Arthur Sackler Foundation, and was on loan to Fordham's University Museum of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. (See attached photo.) The rare piece offered here also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1381237
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact Romano-Egyptian terracotta fish that dates to the Roman Period, circa 30 B.C.-324 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece was made with a dark red-tan clay, and was mold made from two halves. This attractive piece also some thick gray-white deposits, which was also made from it's original white gesso that coated the entire piece. This piece has a curved body that creates movement for the viewer, and there is an open mouth, a small vent hole under the body, and detailed fins. This piece was also likely a votive object that provided sustenance for the departed in the after-life, and this type of piece is also relatively scarce on the market. This piece also likely depicts a Nile perch, which was a popular fish in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1351887
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare and esoteric piece is an Olmec seated duck poison bottle that dates circa 1100-800 B.C. This vessel is attributed to the Las Bocas region of Mexico, and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This piece has an attractive lustrous black glaze, along with some spotty light brown burnishing that is seen on all of the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is also in the form of a hollow container, as the top of the head has an opening into the hollow section of the lower body. This type of vessel is also known as a "poison bottle", as they generally held a substance such as red cinnabar or another hallucinogenic powder or liquid. This vessel was likely used in a ceremonial capacity, and this was likely the case for the majority of glazed Olmec vessels that depict birds such as ducks, raptors, and songbirds. (Another analogous "poison bottle" vessel of this type portraying a raptor is seen in "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, 1996, Harry Abrams Pub., no. 61, p. 183. See attached photo.) The esoteric vessel offered here has a very animated face with dotted eyes, and two squat legs and an extended tail that serve as a tripod base for the vessel. There is also a "double dot-and-bar" symbol seen between the eyes, and the eyes also appear to represent dots as well. The "four-dots-and-bar" motif is also thought to represent the "axis mundi", as the conduit between the Olmec natural and supernatural realms, and the two dotted eyes together with the "double dot-and-bar" symbol, may be a representation of the "four-dots-and-bar" motif. The symbolism seen on this piece also reinforces the theory that this piece was created as a ceremonial type vessel. This piece is an exceptional example of Olmec ceramic art, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #984306
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This striking ancient Greek coin is a hemidrachm that was minted circa 390-370 B.C. This coin was minted in the civic mint of Neapolis, and grades extremely fine in condition (EF/EF). Neapolis developed as an Athenian colony, and was important because of the rich silver mines that were in the region. Neapolis was located on the coast of the Greek mainland directly opposite the island of Thasos. The obverse is a facing Gorgon that has an open mouth with a protruding tongue, and this was the civic symbol of Neapolis. The Gorgon was the Greek mythical beast that turned men into stone. There is also a single dot seen below the cheek of the Gorgon, and this may be an indication of value. The reverse has a delicate young female head facing right, and has been classified by many numismatists as being a young nymph. It is my contention that this young female head is Artemis Parthenos, who was a goddess that was popular in the wild interior of this region. This head is rendered with exceptional detail, as one can easily see individual hairs and a delicate single strand necklace. There is also Greek lettering seen running around the head: N-E-O-II. This coin is approximately 1.88 gms, and is 14mm in diameter. (Another example of the same grade was offered by Freeman & Sear, Fixed Price List 11, June 2006, no. 28, for $1,500.00.) Die references: Sear 1417, Jameson 954, and Dewing 1067. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362320
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb graded ancient Greek coin is a silver didrachm that is attributed to the island of Corcyra (Corfu), and dates circa 229-180 B.C. This coin has an extremely large flan that is approximately 23mm in diameter, weighs 4.7 gms, and is superb condition (EF+/EF+). The obverse (Obv.) features the ivy wreathed bust of a young Dionysus facing right, within a dotted border; and the reverse (Rev.) shows the winged Pegasus flying right, with a ships prow symbol and a (PK) monogram below, and a (APK) monogram above. This coin is also perfectly centered and has an extremely large flan which shows all the elements noted above on the reverse, and this is rarely seen on this scarce issue. This coin may also have been over-struck over another coin, and during the minting process, the flan was hammered several times before being struck, and this may also explain the extremely large size of the flan. This coin also has high relief which is also seldom seen on this issue. This coin was also likely minted shortly after the island surrendered to the Romans circa 229 B.C., and it became a Roman protectorate. Although this coin is classified as being a Greek coin, it technically is a Roman coin, not only because of it's minting technique, but also because of the artistic style of the issue. This coin in fact has very analogous artistic style to many Roman Republic issues. The coin offered here is one of the best recorded examples, and is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition, centering, and extremely large flan. References: HGC 6, 65; Sear 2027. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1335899
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This superb Greek bronze is a solid cast handle with the top section of an oinochoe that dates to the late Archaic Period, circa 520-490 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 5.25 inches in diameter. This piece consists of the upper part of a bronze oinochoe, and it has an amazing designed lion handle that has exceptional detail. This handle was cast as one piece and is very solid. The handle also has a well defined acanthus palmette design at the terminal end, and is solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. The handle has a detailed lion's main which runs up the handle, and away from the realistic designed lion's head that is seen with an open mouth and an extended tongue. The realistic design of the lions head is truly a great work of art, as the minute design is very fine and has exquisite realistic features. This facing lion's head is seen facing the inner spout of the vessel, and this design is a Greek "Archaic Period" convention of art. This impressive piece also has a dainty ivy leaf and tendril floral pattern that is seen running around the neck of the vessel. This beautiful piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and some light to dark brown deposits. Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, Leo Mildenberg collection, Dec. 2011, no. 98. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. This piece does not have the detail, nor the superb artistic style of the superb vessel offered here.) The piece offered here is an exceptional "Archaic Period" Greek bronze, and is seldom seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. This solid piece can also be modified with a modern clasp, and can easily be worn today. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372975
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This dainty and mint conditioned Greek Attic kylix dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches high, by 6.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous black blaze and is seen on the outer and inner surfaces of the piece, save for the bottom of the vessel that has an unglazed section. This unglazed reserved section also has a "circle-and-dot" design element seen on the bottom center of the vessel. The shoulder of the piece is slightly offset, and is a well made example. This piece is also in flawless condition, with no repair/restoration, and has a great deal of muti-colored iridescence patina. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. A flawless Greek Attic vessel with nice eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this complete piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here, as the hardened earthen glaze has preserved these pieces. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 12.5 and 8 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". The shaft was also likley tapered, and was thinner at the back end of the shaft which would save weight for the weapon. In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398820
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This superb piece is an Egyptian alabaster cosmetic vessel that dates to the Late Dynastic Period, 26th-31st Dynasty, circa 664-332 B.C., and is approximately 2.5 inches high with the lid, by 2.4 inches in diameter at the base. This piece is a complete example, as it has the original lid that was made with the main body, and the side lug handles are original with no repair and/or restoration. This superb piece is also near mint "as found" condition, save for a minute chip on the underside edge of the lid and some roughness on the flat bottom. This roughness on the flat bottom also has some heavy calcite deposits and some spotty dark brown mineral deposits which is also an excellent indication of age. This carved banded alabaster vessel also has a nice light honey-brown patina, and has not been over cleaned as the majority of these vessels have. The patina on the main body of this vessel also matches sections of the lower lid. There is also some minute root marking seen on both the outer and inner surfaces of this esoteric vessel as well. This piece has a very attractive shape, and graduates in size from the lip of the main body down to the flat base. There are also bow drilled holes seen within each lug handle, as well as the raised handle at the top of the lid. This piece is scarce with it's original lid and condition, and is a superb vessel for the type. This type of alabaster vessel is also known as a "beehive" type vessel, and was likely made in Naukratis, Egypt by Greek artists for export. For the type see: "Naukratis: Greeks in Egypt, Stone Vessels" by Aurelia Masson, The British Museum Pub., Fig. 7. Ex: Private New York art market circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1395146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
These Bactrian Near Eastern and rare (50) fifty triangular fittings are carved from a hard limestone, and are approximately 2500-1800 B.C. These pieces are approximately .80-1.1 inches high, by .20 inches thick, and are all triangular shaped with a "notched rounded edge" that runs around the edge of each piece. These appealing and decorative pieces also have an attractive light to dark gray patina, and are all intact, save for five pieces that have repaired breaks. These pieces are in remarkable condition, as they could easily be damaged and/or shattered simply by dropping them on a hard surface, as they are relatively thin limestone plaques. The principle reason they are in their superb to mint quality "as found" condition, is that they were likely inlaid into an object such as a wooden box, a furniture piece, or possibly even the face of a wooden shield. A number of these pieces also have have a more pronounced patina on one side than the other, and this may also be an indication that these pieces were embedded into a perishable object as noted above. These pieces are a nice group of individually carved objects with a high degree of eye appeal. These pieces are also offered with a custom display case/frame, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: