Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356984
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Roman gold earring with a shield emblem is a complete example, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive and large example is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter, and weighs 3.5 grams. This piece is a solid example, and is not plated. The shield emblem seen on this superb piece has a dotted decorative element in the center, and a beaded border. The clasp has been wired shut, as the wearer likely wore this piece everyday. The clasp can be adjusted so that it can be easily worn today, and the hoop is very durable as it has a large diameter. The shield emblem also has a single rivet that attaches it to the solid gold hoop, and this adds additional strength and durability to this beautiful example. This piece also has some spotty dark red/brown deposits, and can easily be cleaned. This piece is a very collectable example of ancient jewelry, and is an exceptional large piece. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1374604
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This type of piece has been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans, and has also been attributed to a later time frame as being Parthian, as well as Sassanian, because the material and construction techniques of this piece are all attributed to this region and these cultures. This attractive piece is made from a beautiful white and dark brown banded agate stone that is mounted in a gold frame. This attractive frame is also made from a flat plate with seven added granular triangle designs, and an outer and inner twisted gold rope rim band. The back side of the gold frame encloses the sides of the agate stone, and firmly holds it into place. There is also a hoop at the back, as this piece likely hung within a necklace that had additional pieces of this type, and may have been the central component of the overall necklace. A complete necklace of this type is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. (This piece is published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, no. 159. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is scarce to rare for the type, and is seldom seen on the market in this natural "as found" condition. This piece is also very durable, and can easily be worn today. This beautiful piece also hangs on it's custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Davis and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #778770
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This banded white and light yellow marble Sumerian stamp seal is in the form of a recumbent fox and dates circa 3500-2900 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 1.25 inches long and is an exceptional example for the type. This esoteric piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the top to the bottom center, and there are two animals seen on the flat back side that were carved into the piece. The overall carving of this piece is very detailed and represents a high degree of workmanship, as this piece was produced at the very dawn of civilization when city-states were first formed. The two animals, seen on the back flat side, appear to be identical and served as a stamp and/or seal, and may have represented value in a transaction. This mint quality stamp seal/amulet appears to be a fox, as the head is very angular, along with the raised ears. ( For another analogous example see Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Ada Small Moore Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Seals", New York, Dec. 1991, no. 3, $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates. ) This piece was probably part of a necklace, and the vertical bow drilled hole allowed this piece to hang with other seals/amulets of this type. This translucent piece has some spotty mineral deposits, and these deposits can be seen within the eyes, and become darker when one looks through this piece into a lighted background. ( See attached photo. ) This eerie effect makes this piece look alive, and the deposits seen within the eyes may in part be original inlay. Only a skilled artist could achieve this visual effect. This exceptional piece is mounted on a custom plexiglas stand, can easily lift off the stand, and can be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece has two sections that are both intact, and no repair/restoration. In addition, there are no minute cracks seen in both sections, and there are some heavy white calcite deposits with some attractive root marking that is seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This esoteric pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel, and is of a type and form that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1295159
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,675.00
This rare piece is a Roman bronze figurine that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This impressive piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This complete piece also has an even beautiful dark blue/green patina with spotty red highlights, and is in excellent condition with no noticeable breaks or chips. This piece is seen standing with the full weight on the left leg, and the other leg is slightly bent while the body is seen slightly leaning to the right. This piece also stands by itself, and is placed on a custom stand for added stability. This piece has extremely refined facial detail, and there are other minute details seen on this piece such as the design of the sandals. The figure seen here may also depict Alexander the Great, as it displays many attributes that are known for this dynamic Greek figure from antiquity. Although this piece is a Roman bronze, the Greek features seen on this piece are unmistakable, such as the Greek muscled cuirass which is worn over the Greek knee-length "chiton", the attached cape "chlamys" which falls behind, and the pose of the figure that is seen with the weight on one leg. In addition, this figure has upswept curls above the forehead known as an "anastole" hair style, along with thick locks of leonine hair, deep set eyes, an angular jaw, and a prominent brow which are all facial features of Alexander the Great. This figure is also seen extending his right arm, and the open upturned hand likely held a missing round "phiale", which held wine that was used for sacrificial offerings to the Gods. This military figure also appears to be in the act of offering wine sacrifice to the Gods, and this type of wine sacrifice using a "phiale" was purely a Greek religious rite, rather than a Roman ritual. It's possible that this figurine reminded the owner in Roman times of Alexander's visit to Troy, as he was the new Achilles - the champion of the Greeks and, as Achilles had done 1,000 years before, he sacrificed in the temple of Athena. Wealthy and cultivated Romans would often engage the topic of Alexander's notable personality, his superhuman accomplishments, and the human fate with their philosophical discourses. It would not be surprising to find his image in the intimacy of a domestic villa. The famous Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum contained a whole collection of several bronze busts representing Greek Hellenistic rulers, Greek poets, and philosophers, which serves as an eloquent example of the cultural preferences of the Roman elite. This figurine also appears to be grasping a Roman sword known as a "gladius", which had a rounded pummel as seen here. The Roman general Marcus Antony also favored Greek dress as seen on this figurine, and this piece may also represent a "duality of portraiture", in that it is a combination of Greek and Roman attributes, and may represent more than one famous individual and/or military leader. What is certain relative to this rare figurine, is that this figure is both a military and religious figure, and this combination is best displayed in the figurine offered here. (Another analogous example of a Roman bronze figurine in the guise of Alexander the Great, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. Approximately 3.75 inches high, circa 1st-3rd century A.D., and complete. $47,500.00 fixed price. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : South American : Textiles : Pre AD 1000 item #1338394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This scarce piece is a Bolivian textile that dates circa late 19th century, and is approximately 26.25 inches wide by 34.5 inches long. This Bolivian "Ahuayo" type textile is generally woven in alpaca, and sometimes sheep wool was added as well. This attractive example also has a very tight weaving design and there are many knots per square inch. The weaving of this piece took and great deal of skill, as well as time, because the weaving is very fine and detailed. This piece has alternating striped bands in light purple, teal blue, white, red, and rose colors. This piece is stitched from two halves, with a slit in the middle that forms a poncho. This piece was also likely made for a child or a young man judging from the overall size of the piece. The fabric holding both halves together also appears to be somewhat old, and may have been done at a later date. The piece also appears to be in extremely fine condition, and is intact. The colors are also vibrant for the period, and this piece is a scarce example. This piece is also analogous to the example seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1986, no. 35. ($800.00-$1,200.00 estimates, $1,045.00 realized. See attached photo.) This piece can also easily be mounted in a clear Plexiglas case which would enhance it's high eye appeal. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York circa 1980's. Ex: Private Santa Fe, NM, collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388453
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta bust that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high. This large bust is intact, save a small edge chip around the vent hole hole rim seen at the back of the head, and is a terracotta that likely represents a goddess such as Demeter. This goddess is also seen wearing an elaborate and thick diadem, and has a very serene face. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some spotty earthen and mineral deposits. This piece is a pleasing example for the type, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 4.7 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1341167
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This superb Olmec seated figurine dates to the Intermediate Olmec Period, circa 900-600 B.C., and is approximately 3.6 inches high, by 1.9 inches wide, by 1.75 inches deep. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and was carved from a light to dark green serpentine stone. This piece also has some spotty light black to dark green dotted inclusions seen within the stone, and a light brown patina seen in the deep recesses of the figurine. There is also some spotty minute root marking, and some faint traces of red cinnabar. This piece likely depicts a shaman seen in the seated position, and it is a complete carved figure that is finished in the round. This attractive piece also sits upright without falling over, as this piece also has a flat to slightly outward curved underside that provides a solid base. The arms and hands are seen resting on the knees of the crossed legs, and the oval shaped head is seen slightly tilted to the left. The entire body appears to be nude, as are most Olmec figurines of this type, and the facial expression also features the typical downward turned thick lips and horizontal deep carved eyes. The mouth design with the thick lips that are downturned, is also known as the "Olmec jaguar mouth", and is the prominent design feature of the piece offered here. The "jaguar mouth" seen on this piece is also thrust forward towards the viewer, and was an intentional design of the artist, and one can easily see this design feature as one looks at this figurine from the side in profile. The slight tilt of the head also accentuates the design of the face, and gives this piece a great deal of expression. The wide nose has two small bow drilled holes for the nostrils, and in addition, there are two bow drilled holes seen at each end of each eye. The overall face design is one that is seen as a "transformation" type face, from human to jaguar, or vice-versa. The seated and/or kneeling pose of this figurine is also known as the "transformation shaman pose", which is associated with Olmec figurines that are thought to depict a shaman in various stages of transformation from human to jaguar, and vice-versa. (See "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", by F. Kent Reilly III, Princeton University, Abrams Pub., 1995, pp. 27-45.) The superb Olmec figurine offered here is an excellent example of Olmec "transformational" type art, and is seldom offered on the market in this condition. This piece also has an extensive authentication examination report from Stoetzer, Inc., Miami, FL., report #010514.1, dated 02/09/2014; and was also authenticated by Robert Sonin, New York, c/o Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Edmund Budde Collection, circa 1950's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the authentication examination report noted above.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357105
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with hemispherical shields are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These lovely pieces are approximately .68 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the hemispherical shields are approximately .25 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 1.6 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The hemispherical shields have a smooth facing surface, and have a great deal of eye appeal because of their simplicity of design. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. These pieces are a nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and have a pleasing eye appeal. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, no. 43. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388642
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This beautiful and esoteric piece is a Greek terracotta of a Kore, and dates to the 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand. On the stand it is approximately 5.3 inches high. This piece was mold made, as it has a flat backside, and is a light tan terracotta. This piece depicts a Greek Kore, whose name means "maiden", and this goddess was responsible for good fortune and the change of seasons with the "rebirth" of spring, and she was also known as "Persephone". This goddess also has an extended arm and may be making an offering. The esoteric face has a slight smile, almond eyes, and a square chin which are also artistic style hallmarks for the period. This piece also has falling hair curls over her breasts which also accentuates her role as a fertility goddess. This piece is also intact, save for the missing arm sections and a small section of the lower torso. This piece is also in superb "as found" condition, and has some earthen and minute white calcite deposits. Overall, this piece is in superb condition, and has a very esoteric look with superb artistic style for the period. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen Ag, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring", and dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom, and was mounted on a war chariot that served as a guide for the horse reins. The reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer greater control over the horses. The design of this piece, with a raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins that connected to the two horses that pulled a Celtic war chariot. This piece also has an attachment loop at the base which was mounted down into a wooden rail, and was held in place by a pin. This esoteric piece was also made when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain, circa 55 B.C., and the war chariot was relatively new to the Romans as a weapon of war. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a shield and spear, gave the Romans all they could handle at the time of the invasion. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the Gallic tribe whose capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooded frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology, and the piece offered here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This complete piece has a graceful shape, has no repair/restoration, and has a beautiful dark green patina. There is also some spotty mineral deposits seen mostly on the underside of the piece. Another analogous piece of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no. 339. (2500-3500 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre 1492 item #1185287
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive piece is an Inka-Chimu canteen vessel that dates circa 1450-1533 A.D. This piece is approxiamtely 8.5 inches high by 3.5 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive glossy black glaze with some dark brown burnishing. This piece has an indented depression on each side, and seen centered within, is a star and a spiral symbol on each side of the vessel. The star is a well known Inka symbol, and is often seen as a design shape on Inka bronze mace heads and black basalt bowls. The spiral design is also seen as a sacred Nazca line symbol, and these line symbols created in the desert were constructed by the Nazca to have been viewed by the Gods from the air. The sacred Nazca spiral design may have served as a "water/rain symbol", and the canteen vessel offered here may have held water in a votive capacity as well. (An analogous sacred Nazca spiral symbol is seen published in "The Mystery On the Desert" by Maria Reiche, pub. 1949, reprint 1968.) The piece offered here was also likely made by Chimu potters who simply continued working for their Inka masters who conquered their city state of Chanchan circa 1470 A.D. The piece offered here derives from earlier Chimu pottery types/techniques, notably the lustrous blackware made by the north-coast potters of Chanchan and Lambayaque. One feature of these Chimu potters, seen on the vessel offered here, is the single elongated neck of the vessel. This piece is an interesting example of Andean pre-Columbian art, as it has symbols that are common to several cultures, and has a very esoteric shape which is another hallmark of Inka ceramics. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1351962
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful Greco-Roman marble bust is a portrait of a young god that dates to the late Hellenistic period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, and was once part of a statuette. This piece portrays a young god wearing a Greek Hellenistic "Attic" type helmet, and has a slightly upturned head, along with the head slightly tilted to the left that is also seen bending away form the angled neck. In addition, the eyes are slightly upturned which is a god-like attribute relative to Greek Hellenistic art. The eyes also being deeply inset also draws the viewer to the fleshy lips that are also added features of early Hellenistic Greek period art that was established by Lysippos, who produced striking portraits of Alexander the Great. (For the artistic style related to the portraiture of Alexander the Great that is attributed to Lysippos, see the attached photo from the "Search of Alexander" exhibit catalog, 1980, no. 25. This photo is of a marble bust of Alexander the Great now seen in the Pella Museum, Greece, and was executed in the 2nd century B.C. as a portrait that represented Alexander as a romantic divinity in the late Hellenistic period.) The attractive marble bust offered here also follows this earlier artistic sculptural style, and is very analogous in artistic style to the Pella example noted above. The piece offered here also likely represents the Greek and Roman war gods Ares and Mars, but the likeness seen here of this young warrior god also represents many known portraits of Alexander the Great, and in effect, this piece could have represented and doubled both as a god and Alexander. (For the portrait type see: A. Stewart, "Faces of Power, Alexander's Image and Hellenistic Politics".) This superb piece has some minor losses to the nose and to the lower chin, otherwise it is a complete example. This piece also has some spotty root marking, and a beautiful light brown patina over a bright white Parian type marble. This piece is an attractive example, and is an excellent representation of late Hellenistic period Greek art which also has exceptional artistic style. This exceptional piece is also mounted on a steel pin along with a custom Plexiglas display base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1359731
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze slashing sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This remarkable piece is approximately 21.4 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide at the point where the blade meets the shank of the weapon. This piece was hand forged into one piece from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This powerful weapon also has a blade that slightly graduates in width from the shank to the blunt end, and this blade section of the weapon is slightly curved. The straight rectangle shaped "extended shaft" is also very durable, and is approximately .5 inches wide at the shank, by .25 inches thick. This weapon's "extended shaft" also slightly graduates in size, mostly with the width, from the shank to the end of the handle. The cutting edge of the blade is also only on one side, as the blunt end is flat, along with the top side of the blade. Overall, this weapon is very finely made for the period, and has subtle dimensions of construction which makes it a very special and specialized work of ancient arms. This weapon was designed to slash through an enemy with one sweeping motion, and an extended "wooden shaft handle" would have allowed this weapon to be held with one or two hands. This design also allowed this weapon to likely be able to penetrate heavy armor such as a helmet or a breastplate, as the "extended shaft" attached to an extended "wooden shaft handle" would allow one to generate a tremendous amount of force. This weapon may also have been designed for use from a chariot or horseback, as the owner would be able to slash in a downwards motion, which would have generated even more force than a horizontal slash. This weapon may also be of a type that was used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with some red highlights, and some spotty light to dark green mineralization. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and has an ever so slight bend at the shank which may indicate that this piece was in battle. This weapon is extremely rare, is a highly specialized work of ancient arms, and is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: