Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", Dec. 2004, no. 148. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398232
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This complete and interesting piece is an Egyptian-Phoenician carved hard stone beetle scarab that dates to the 25th-27th Dynasties, circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches long, by .8 inches wide, by .5 inches high, and is a complete and solid example. This piece was carved from a hard stone, and has a light brown/yellow patina with some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and has clear carved lines relative to the body of the beetle seen on the top side, and the images seen on the flat back side. The flat back side has a carved winged dotted disk seen above, a horned animal at each side, a rabbit below, and a horned ram's head at the center. These animals may also represent reproduction and the continuance of life, and for the ancient Egyptians, the scarab beetle represented rebirth and regeneration. This type of piece was also copied by the Phoenicians who used this type of piece in jewelry. This piece has a bow-drilled hole that runs through the center, and this piece may have been part of a necklace, and may also have served as a votive burial object. Objects of this type for this period were usually made from faience, and were not carved from a hard stone as this fine example. This piece also has a custom display stand, and one can turn this piece to show both sides as well. For the type see: John Boardman, "Classical Phoenician Scarabs: A Catalog and Study", Archaeopress, 2003. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394151
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This spiritual piece is a Huari double-spout vessel that dates circa 800-1000 A.D., and is approximately 6.2 inches high, by 5.4 inches in diameter. This piece is painted with vibrant colors in reddish-brown, cream, gray, and black colors. This piece shows a flying avain (parrot?) on each side, and is seen over a reddish-brown background. The bottom half of this vessel is painted with a dark gray color, along with the two raised spouts. This type of vessel is also known as a "bridge type" vessel, as there is a handle that is seen between both of the raised spouts. This piece is a "spiritual type" vessel, as the avains portrayed appear to be in flight, and/or are seen in the spirit world. The design of the piece also has geometric line design, and this is also an artistic hallmark of this culture. The main body of this vessel is intact, save for the bridge handle that was re-attached to both of the raised spouts, and this repair appears to be quite old, and was likely done 25 plus years ago. The thick glaze on this vessel is also intact, save for one side that has some minor losses. Overall, this vessel is in extremely fine condition, and is a nice example for the type. An analogous example was sold in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 257A. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,610 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that the piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1290668
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive coin is a Greek EL (electron) hekte that was minted in Kyzikos, circa 550-500 B.C. This scarce piece shows the winged helmeted head of Perseus on the obverse, with a tunny fish behind; and the reverse is a quadripartite incuse square punch. This piece is superb quality (EF+/EF+), is approximately 12mm, 2.69gms, is well centered for the type, and has a lustrous high relief sharp portrait of the mythical figure Perseus. The portrait is also seen in the "Greek Archaic" artistic style, and is seen with a large almond eye, a large nose and chin, and a slight smile. "Greek Archaic" portraiture is also a very desirable feature highly valued by collectors of ancient Greek coins, and the portrait seen here is a fine example. There is also an unobtrusive test mark behind the bust, and is very difficult to see, and does not detract from the detailed and high relief portrait of Perseus. Kyzikos was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. The city's prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made it a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas, and the coin seen here likely was made to facilitate port and shipping fees. Kyzikos principle export was the tunny fish, which is often seen on the obverse of it's coinage. The prevalence of winged beings seen on Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of an archaic mythical convention of art, that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as a symbol of their nature, and in the case of the gods, of their power to move across great distances. On the coin offered here, we see Perseus, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danae, who was the daughter of the king of Argos; and as Perseus had divine status, he was widely worshiped and admired among the ancient Greeks. On the exceptional coin offered here, he is depicted as a divine entity wearing a winged helmet, which is the so-called "Helm of Hades", which rendered its owner invisible to other supernatural entities and mortals. This winged helmet was given to him by Athena, in order to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa. The coin offered here is scarce to rare on the market, and is a rare depiction of Perseus. Von Fritze no. 65. SNG von Aulock no. 1186. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1319158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two scarce bronze pieces are from the Urnfield culture, and date late Bronze Age, circa 13th-10th century B.C. These two matching detailed pieces are each approximately 4 to 3.6 inches in diameter, as they are elliptical in shape. They each have an opening that is approximately 1.22 inches wide, and these were made to fit on the upper or lower arm. Each piece also has an incised "line-and-herringbone" design that is seen running around the entire outer edge of each piece, and runs from each terminal end to terminal end. This incised design is very detailed, and can easily be seen some distance from each piece. These pieces are in mint "as found" condition, and have no repair/restoration. They also have an even and beautiful dark blue to dark green patina that is exceptional. It is also more likely that these pieces were votive, and were not intended to be worn every day, but it may also be possible that these pieces were worn for special ceremonial events. This type of piece has also been found in votive hoard offerings, and the pieces offered here could also have been created entirely for this purpose, as bronze was extremely valuable at the time that these pieces were created. The Urnfield Culture, circa 1300 B.C.-750 B.C., was a late Bronze Age culture of central Europe, and it's name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields. The Urnfield culture followed the Tumulus culture and was succeeded by the Hallstatt culture. Linguistic evidence and continuity with the subsequent Hallstatt culture suggests that the people of this area spoke an early form of celtic, perhaps originally proto-Celtic. It's also notable that the early Urnfield period, circa 1300 B.C., was a time when the warriors of central Europe were often heavily armored with body armor, helmets, and shields all made of bronze. The Urnfield culture has votive weapons, bronze pins, and bracelets such as the pieces offered here, that often have been found in warrior's graves. This prolific amount of bronze weapons and objects, attributed to this culture, likely borrowed the idea and burial customs from Mycenaean Greece. These pieces also hang from an included custom display stand. These solid pieces have a great deal of eye appeal and can easily be worn today. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1027193
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This extremely rare piece is an early Islamic glass flask, circa 6th-8th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is a light green color with multi-colored iridescence that is seen on various inner and outer sections of the vessel. This piece is rather thick walled, has a fairly wide indented bottom, a short tubular neck that has a slight flattening at the base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. In addition, the neck is folded to the inside, and there are three stepped bulges seen within the neck which are a light yellow, green, and purple color. This piece is likely an early example of Islamic glass, due to the overall fabric of the vessel and the neck design as noted above. This piece is from an extremely rare early Islamic glass group, and some of these extremely rare pieces from this group are also listed as "possibly Sassanian", but given the probable region, i.e. Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot, where this piece was likely manufactured, a Sassanian attribution from modern day central Iran is highly unlikely. This piece, as being from this extremely rare early Islamic glass group, is also one of the earliest Islamic glass examples recorded. An analogous example listed as "possibly Islamic and of possible Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot manufacture", approximately 2.5 inches high, is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John B. Hayes, Royal Ontario Museum Pub., 1975, no. 670. (See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example is seen in Sotheby Park Bernet Inc., Important Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1978, no. 138. (This piece is nearly the same size as the piece offered here, and is listed as "probably later Sassanian or early Islamic, circa 5th-8th century A.D.") The example offered here has a type of construction within the neck that required a great deal of skill, and is more advanced than the typical late Roman blown glass that is seen in the 4th-5th century A.D. Islamic glass also tends to have several colors within the glass, in contrast to the Sassanian culture, which was known for producing faceted cut glass that was more uniform in color. The Sassanian culture, circa 6th-8th century A.D., was from central modern day Iran, and was very skilled at glass production, and they are known for being able to take a solid cube of glass and carve/sculpt this into a faceted cup, bowl, or a plate. The exceptional small flask offered here is not only in mint condition, but it is also a type that is not seen on the market or in private collections. This extremely rare piece is a little gem and would be an excellent addition to a collection of ancient glass. Ex: Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374571
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This brilliant Roman glass flask dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high. This piece is mint quality, and has no cracks and/or chips. This piece is a dark orange-brown amber colored glass, and has an extended flat lip with a folded rim, along with an elongated neck. This piece is also relatively "thick-walled", and has a very durable compact design. This vessel's globular body, with a wide elongated neck that is a third of the vessel's height, is also a hallmark design of early Roman Imperial Period glass. This piece has an exceptional brilliant "reddish-gold" multi-iridescent patina, and there is a thin silvery iridescent film patina layer seen on various sections of the vessel. This attractive silvery layer also fills into some heavy root marking as well. This type of Roman glass vessel is also classified as being "mid 1st century A.D." by John Hayes in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, pp. 34-35, no. 101. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv. #P33-059-012614a. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,185.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is a thick walled example, and is also a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are in fact, an added plus towards the value of the piece. This attractive piece has an exceptional dark green patina with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is very desirable, due to the reasons noted above, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze, and was hammered into shape and the form we see today. This piece was finished with detailed repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "Classical Period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian Empire) deep bowls. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great, who subsequently paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece also comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980.s-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in the ancient Near East. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece may also have been a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce extremely large piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact, and is in mint condition with no repair/restoration. The surface of this exceptional piece also has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina, along with a rich glossy black glaze, and in addition, there is some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel that features a vibrant facing Silenus head that was mold made, and has very high relief, as it is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type usually do not have this added design feature. This large piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. An intact and scarce x-large vessel that is seldom seen the market, and is one of the best recorded examples for he type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: