Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310457
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic "Red-Figure" kylix that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high, and is 10 inches wide from handle to handle. This nice Attic ceramic is classified as a "Red-Figured, Type C" kylix, and is attributed to the "Painter of London D12", who is a rare Attic painter that is seldom seen on the market. This piece is intact, save for an ancient break in the stem section of the stemmed footed base, and was repaired in antiquity with a bronze and lead pin. It's quite possible that this piece was broken in antiquity while playing the drinking game "kottabos", which was played at a drinking party known as a "symposium". This game was played by spinning the kylix on the index finger in order to fling the wine dregs swirling in the bottom of the cup onto a target in the room. Obviously, many kylix drinking cups were broken while playing this game. The ancient bronze and lead pin is approximately 2 inches long, and reattached the stemmed base to the main body of the piece. One end of the pin can also be seen on the inner surface in the middle of the tondo, and the other end can be seen centered within the stemmed base on the bottom side. The original owner must have thought enough of this attractive piece to have had it repaired for use again. This piece has a seated young man facing right within the round tondo, and is seen wearing a himation (cloak). The facial details of this young man are very detailed, and his pleasing young face is easily seen. The cloak also has curved definition lines, and a single thick black line that defines the garment edge, and both of these artistic features are artistic features of the early 5th century. It's quite possible that this piece may be attributed to an earlier painter such as "Makron", due to the artistic features noted above, rather than a slightly later painter such as the "Painter of London D12". The exterior surface has a lustrous black glaze, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional piece that is also a scarce example with an ancient repair. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1994, no. 109. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1335899
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This superb Greek bronze is a solid cast handle with the top section of an oinochoe that dates to the late Archaic Period, circa 520-490 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 5.25 inches in diameter. This piece consists of the upper part of a bronze oinochoe, and it has an amazing designed lion handle that has exceptional detail. This handle was cast as one piece and is very solid. The handle also has a well defined acanthus palmette design at the terminal end, and is solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. The handle has a detailed lion's main which runs up the handle, and away from the realistic designed lion's head that is seen with an open mouth and an extended tongue. The realistic design of the lions head is truly a great work of art, as the minute design is very fine and has exquisite realistic features. This facing lion's head is seen facing the inner spout of the vessel, and this design is a Greek "Archaic Period" convention of art. This impressive piece also has a dainty ivy leaf and tendril floral pattern that is seen running around the neck of the vessel. This beautiful piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and some light to dark brown deposits. Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, Leo Mildenberg collection, Dec. 2011, no. 98. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. This piece does not have the detail, nor the superb artistic style of the superb vessel offered here.) The piece offered here is an exceptional "Archaic Period" Greek bronze, and is seldom seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1397562
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze "Tabula Ansata" military plaque that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.4 inches long, by 1.2 inches high, by 1/8 inches thick, and has an exceptional dark green patina with spotty dark brown/red highlights. This piece is rectangular shaped, and was made from a sheet of bronze cut in a "Tabula Ansata" format, which was a tablet with dovetail handles at each end. This type of format was also a favored shape in Imperial Rome for creating votive markers, and "Tabula Ansata" simply means "tablet with handles". Roman bronze military tablets/plaques of this form have also been found with the remnants of leather covers of soldier's shields at Vindonissa, a Roman legion camp at the modern town of Windisch, Switzerland. The example offered here has a hole at each end, and within are remnants of iron rivets, in addition to, an iron rectangular plate seen on the backside of each rivet that fastened the plaque to leather, or some sort of other material. There is also some remnants of this material seen between the plaque and the iron rectangular plates as well. This attractive piece also has five lines of engraved text that reads: VIHANSAE-Q.CATIVS.LIBO.NEPOS.-CENTVRIO.LEG.III-CYRENAICAE.SCV-TVM.ET.LANCEAM.D.D. This piece likely refers to a Roman centurion whose name and title is seen on the first two lines of the plaque, and was a member of the famed Legion III, Cyrenaica, which was first formed by Mark Antony in Alexandria, Egypt circa 35 B.C., and was under his direct command along with his ally, Cleopatra VII. Elements of this legion were also known to have fought in the "First Jewish-Roman War", circa 66-70 A.D., and was one of the principle legions that besieged the city of Jerusalem. Vespasian, Proconsul of Africa, led this campaign, and subsequently, this legion also accompanied Vespasian back to Alexandra, circa 69 A.D., in the "Year of the Four Emperors", and proclaimed Vespasian emperor while also controlling the grain supply to Rome. Vespasian was quickly sworn in as emperor while still in Egypt in December circa 69 A.D. This legion also was known to have participated in yet another Jewish war, the Bar Kokhba revolt, circa 132-136 A.D. Elements of this legion were also known to have been along the Danube River, circa 84-88 A.D., the Parthian frontier under Trajan, circa 120 A.D., and again the Parthian frontier under Lucius Verus, circa 162-166 A.D. It's also likely this legion was involved in the fighting with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra circa 262-267 A.D., and over time, this legion was perhaps one of the most traveled Roman legions in Roman history. This piece is a remarkable Roman military object seldom seen on the market, and sits on a custom display stand. For the type see: Elizabeth Meyer, "Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World: Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice", Cambrige University Press, 2004. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374529
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass flask dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This flawless light green glass piece has no breaks or chips, and is a larger example than what is normally seen. This well designed piece also has a large folded rim at the top that provided greater control while pouring a liquid, and in addition, there is also an indented bottom design that allowed this piece to solidly stand upright. This piece also has an indented section at the bottom of the elongated neck, and this also controlled the flow of liquid within the vessel. This piece has a brilliant multi-iridescent patina with light blue highlights, seen in sections of the vessel, along with some light brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. Overall, an attractive piece with nice eye appeal that has interesting design features. (For the type see, John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Onterio Museum", 1975, no. 231.) Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1262510
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This interesting piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 9 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter, and measures 8.75 inches, from the tip of the vulture head to the other tip of the vulture head seen on the opposite side of the vessel. This attractive piece has nice root marking, and some minute black spotty mineral deposits seen on all of the surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also a scarce type with the two extended vulture heads which are seen on opposite sides of the vessel, and the more common vessel of this type, has extended monkey heads. (See attached photo for the monkey head type. This piece is seen in the Museum of Anthropology and History, San Pedro Sula, Honduras and is published in "I Maya di Copan", Skira Pub., Milan, Italy, 1997, page 139, no. 34.) The superb vessel offered here is intact, and has some very minor stress crack fill which is very difficult to see. This piece has vibrant dark red, black, cream, and orange colors that are seen on the entire outer surface of the piece. The prominent feature of this piece are the two red-headed vulture heads that are seen emerging from each side of the vessel, and their wings and body are stylistically represented below each head on each side of the vessel. These emerging vulture heads are each a vibrant dark red color, which matches the color of this living bird, and these emerging heads also act as handles for this vessel, but this is likely not the primary function of these heads. It's more likely that the Mayan artist wished to emphasize the importance of the vulture in Mayan myth, and created a three-D image of the creature that seems to emerge from the vessel and appears to be alive. There are also two bands that run around the piece, and are seen at the top and bottom section of the vessel. The top band has two boxes, one placed between each vulture head, and within each box is what appears to be another stylized vulture bust showing a section of the wings and head. The bottom band has a red geometric box seen below each stylized vulture body on each side, and there is an identical stylized vulture bust placed between each geometric box. There is also a red line, seen on each side, that acts as dividing line for each side showing the emerging vulture head and painted stylized body. The vulture for the Maya was observed as a death eater. As a consumer of death, the Maya also felt that the vulture could convert death to life, and the vulture was viewed as a symbol of cleansing, renewal, and transformation. As a symbol of renewed life, this type of vessel was likely a Mayan offering vessel that contained a grave good for the afterlife. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,875.00
These two rare and superb carved wooden panels are French, and date to the late Gothic period, circa 1590-1680 A.D. These pieces are a matching pair, although they have slight differences. Both of these carved panels are approximately 7.8 inches wide by 17.75 inches high, and are mounted in frames that are approximately 11.75 inches wide by 28 inches high. These outer frames date circa 1800-1850, and were the mounting for the inner carved panels. The two panels offered here, along with several additional panels, are also thought to have been originally set into a private manor house in Normandy. The bulk of these panels were sold at auction in San Francisco, CA., by Butterfield & Butterfield Co. in June 1996. Many of these panels, which were religious in nature, were identified as being produced by artisans who were employed in the area of Coutances, France, where the massive 13th century Gothic cathedral of Notre Dame was built. The panels seen here were finely carved and have great detail, and the condition of both panels offered here is exceptional. These two panels each display two caryatids that are seen back to back, and are carved in high relief. The caryatids were known in antiquity as the priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, and were often seen as a draped female figure that supported an entablature. The figures seen on these two panels are part lion, with the lion's paw feet, part bird, with the detailed feathered wings, and part woman, with the female breasts and faces. The raised hair comb and luxuriant wavy hair is very detailed as well, and is an excellent mark that the artist that carved these pieces was very skilled. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1930's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339561
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These two fine designed pieces are two matching Viking bronze bracelets that date, circa 9th-10th century A.D. These two Viking culture pieces are approximately 3 inches long, by 2.6 inches in diameter for one bracelet; and the other bracelet is slightly larger and is approximately 3.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches in diameter. Both of these beautiful examples have matching hand stamped intricate pattern design work, and they were made from a single sheet of bronze, hand stamped, then folded into the form seen today. These pieces still retain some flexibility, and in antiquity, they were able to easily flex for the wearer of these bracelets who was likely a young woman. These pieces have a lovely dark green patina, with some attractive spotty dark blue azurite mineral deposits seen in various outer and inner sections of both bracelets. These pieces both display a hand stamped "triangular symbol", with three dots within, that are designed interlocking and are seen running around the perimeter within a double dotted border. There are also two raised bars that run through the middle, and there is a minute and detailed "interwoven cable pattern" seen between, and this "interwoven cable pattern" is seen again on each side of the bracelets. There are also four raised dots with a dotted border that may solar symbols, and extensive minute dotted line work is seen in various sections of the bracelets. The overall hand stamped design seen on both bracelets is very finely done, and the composition of the design work seen on both bracelets match. Only a skilled artist for the period could have produced the matching hand stamped composition seen on both pieces. Both of these nice examples are 100% original, and are intact, save for the slightly larger example that has two strengthened and repaired stress cracks which is normal for very thin bronze metal pieces such as these. These pieces are scarce with the high degree of workmanship seen on these two beautiful pieces, and fine high quality minute Viking hand stamped work is not often seen on the market. These pieces sit on a custom display stand, and can easily removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1373329
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This stylized piece is a Scythian bronze bridle plaque in the form of a recumbent stag that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.3 inches long, by .22 inches thick in the main body of the piece. This interesting piece is a stylized seated recumbent stag that is seen looking back, with his horns arcing up at the front. There is also an extended ear seen below the horns, an elongated neck, a snout touching the hind quarters, and a hole representing a facing eye. This hole likely held a precious stone, and sections of this piece has some worn gold gilt. The back of this piece also has a round attachment ring that allowed this decorative plaque to slide onto, and attach to, a leather strap that likely made up a horse bridle. There was another duplicate ring on the backside that is missing, and this piece is complete and intact save for this missing attachment ring. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina, and overall, this piece is a better example than what is usually seen on the market. (Another example can be seen in "From the Lands of the Scythians" Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975, no. 50. See attached photo.) This piece can also be easily worn today, and comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1352271
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare ceramic is a Moche culture piece that dates to the Moche Period IV, circa 400-600 A.D. This erotic piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7.8 inches wide, and is in intact mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece also has superb surfaces with some attractive spotty dark black deposits, and some dark brown burnishing. This piece is a Moche "stirrup type" vessel, and has a dark red spout, along with two attached figures that is a seated woman wearing a dark orange/brown hooded cloak, and necklace; and a seated spirit figurine that is also seen wearing a cream colored cloak, ear flares, and a decorative hat with a tie that runs under the chin. The decorative hat also has some dark red "line design" features, and is of the type depicted on Moche "portrait type" vessels. The seated woman appears to be expressionless, and has one hand on her abdomen, and the other arm is seen grasping the back of the seated spirit figure. The seated spirit figure also has one arm behind the back of the seated woman, and the other hand is tucked under the cloak of the seated woman and appears to be engaged in the act of masturbating the woman's genital organs. The woman also appears to have an open eyed serene, but transfixed expression. The spirit figure also has a wide smile with his tongue extended out, and in addition to the narrowing almond eyes, these facial features convey a very powerful and licentious expression. The facial expressions of both figures seen on this piece, together portray an erotic image that is so well executed, one could easily label this piece a masterpiece of Moche erotic and pre-Columbian art. The face of this spiritual being is also humanoid, as the extended lower jaw and mouth have primate features. This piece truly conveys Moche erotic art at it's height, and in the Moche mind, the erotic composition of this vessel may have simply referred to the human nature of reproduction and the joy of sex, which in their mind, was a gift from their gods. The exceptional piece offered here is extremely rare, and the only other known recorded example of this type is seen in the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, Peru. (This Museo Larco Museum piece is also published in "Checan: Essays on Erotic Elements in Peruvian Art", by Rafael Larco Hoyle, Nagel Pub., 1965, p. 121. This piece was also likely produced from the same molds as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another reason why Moche erotic vessels of this type are extremely rare, is that the Spanish colonizers who uncovered Moche erotic vessels regarded these pieces as manifestations of something sinful. The Spanish were scandalized by the ceramic's graphic detailing of sex between humans, skeletons, animals, and Moche anthropomorphic deities; and according to Northwestern professor of Anthropology and Sexuality Studies Mary Weismantel: "Moche sex pottery is the largest and most graphic and explicit of all pre-Columbian cultures." The colonial Spanish were shaken to their Catholic core, and over the years, they smashed numerous and rare examples of Moche erotic pottery to bits, and even criminalized the ownership of such pottery, as these Moche erotic ceramics often depicted premarital and non-reproductive sex acts. Even today, the erotic collection of Moche pottery seen at the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, is kept in a secluded separate room. A few years ago they were kept under lock and key at the bottom of the Museum of Archaeology, reserved for only the most educated of eyes; those of social scientists and scholors, and for the rest of the population, the erotic pottery was deemed far too provocative. It's also interesting to note that this piece shows no nudity relative to both of the figures seen on this powerful piece, as they are both fully clothed, but yet, it is the provocative nature of this piece that truly defines this piece as a masterpiece of pre-Columbian art. This extremely rare piece also has a TL Authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 03250811. Ex: Dr. Gottfried Freiherr von Marienfels collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document noted above, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1365793
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Mycenaean/Minoan bronze goddess figurine that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1100 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide at the fluted base, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This attractive figurine has a tubular shape, and was cast as one piece. The esoteric raised arms are also tapered and arc slightly, and in addition, they are curled at the end which forms the stylized hands. The body is also hollow, and there is an opening seen at the top of the body where the neck/head was attached. This neck/head likely was made from wood, or some other perishable material, and was attached into the main body with a dowel. There is also some incised lines seen just below the raised arms at the shoulder area, and this decorative "linear line design" is also seen on many examples of early Greek art from the Late Bronze Age, circa 1300 B.C., down to the Geometric Period, circa 750 B.C. These extremely rare figures may have been a grave offering, and/or could have been an offering that depicted significant rituals that were associated with rites of passage that involved the dead. The figurine offered here could also been part of a group of several figurines of this type, that together, composed a group scene that depicted a ritual as noted above. This theory was developed by Daniela Lefevre-Novaro, and her theory was supported by the figural terracotta models that were found in the Minoan Kamilari burial complex in Kamilari, Crete. These figural models can now be seen in the Herakleion Archaeological Museum, and date circa LM 1A, 1600-1500 B.C. (See "Coming of Age in Ancient Greece", by Jenifer Neils and John Oakley, Yale University Press, 2003, pp. 40-43.) The arms of the figurine offered here are also seen extended into the air, and this is an ancient Greek sign of "blessing" and "mourning" death, especially for children, and this posture is also depicted on art from the Greek Late Bronze Age, circa 13th century B.C. (For two examples that depict images of individuals with raised arms in mourning, see the two "larnakes" from Tanagra, Greece, which are in the Thebes Archaeological Museum, and date circa LH IIIB, 1300-1200 B.C. See two attached photos of these "larnakes" which are terracotta chests that were used as coffins.) The raised arms may also depict and/or represent bull's horns, which was connected to the Minoan culture, and this figurine may have served in this capacity as well, but the exact symbolic representation of these early Mycenaean/Minoan figurines is unknown. What is known, is that the majority of these votive pieces were made from terracotta, rather than bronze, and this is another reason why these exceptional bronze figurines are extremely rare. There have also been numerous terracotta figurines with uplifted arms found in Cyprus dated from the 11th century B.C., down to the 5th century B.C. This type of goddess figurine is also thought to have originated in Crete, and has been identified as being a "mother goddess" connected to fertility. (See "Ancient Cyprus" by Vassos Karageorghis, 1981, p. 125.) In summary, the piece offered here is likely a goddess figurine that represented several of the aspects noted above, and was either a votive grave offering, or an offering in a shrine. This esoteric bronze goddess figurine is intact, has no repair/restoration, and easily stands upright by itself. This piece also has a beautiful light to dark green patina with dark blue highlights, some minute root marking, and some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece also sits on a custom stand and can easily be lifted off. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This large piece is a Greek Attic "Black-figure" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C., and is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 11 inches wide from handle to handle. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has an even dark glossy black glaze. This lustrous black glaze is seen on the inner and outer surfaces, save the bottom of the kylix that has a light red terracotta reserve. The surfaces also have an attractive multi-colored iridescence patina seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is a dark orange and black palmette tondo seen in the bottom center of the vessel. This piece also has a ring base, and an offset shoulder seen on the inside of the vessel. An analogous example was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, May, 1987, no. 258. ($400.00-$700.00 estimates, and is a smaller example.) A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1148500
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek amphora that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 220-180 B.C. This large piece is approximately 10.75 inches high, and is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, cracks, and chips. This piece is a light red terracotta, and has an attractive white over glaze with some earthern deposits. There are also some minute spotty black mineral deposits and root marking, and this piece is in its natural "as found" condition. This piece has a flat bottom, attractive rounded body, and two raised strap handles which attach just below the lip of the vessel. This piece resembles a pelike, but unlike a pelike, this piece has a narrow opening with raised handles which are attached below the upper lip of the vessel. This design type is a common feature that is seen with most Greek amphoras. This piece also has a "double lip" type design, which allowed this piece to have a seal over the top which could easily be secured with a cord below the top lip. This type of piece has a very pleasing eye appeal, and is very decorative. In addition, this piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market in this mint condition. Ex: Private New Jersey collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1339434
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This detailed little gem of a piece is a Greek silver infant fibula pin that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.2 inches high, by .75 inches wide. This piece is extremely rare to rare, as it was made for an infant, and it has extremely fine details and workmanship. Ancient Greek silver fibula pins of this type, are seldom seen on the market, and there is the possibility that this type of fibula was more votive in nature. This piece is intact, save for the missing pin, and it is "bow-shaped" with three raised "barrel-type" sections seen within the length of the piece. At the terminal end where the rotating pin was attached, there is a dainty, but detailed acanthus design seen on the front side. The back side of this terminal end is flat, and one can easily discern that this side is the back side of the piece. This piece has a lovely light gray patina, with some spotty dark gray mineral deposits. An analogous example can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, accession number: 52.36. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1247108
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
These two superb bronze plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, and date circa 5th-3rd century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 4.25 inches long by 2.3 inches high, and have an attractive dark brown/black patina with gold gilt and dark red highlights. There is also some minute root marking seen mostly on the back side of each piece, and there is some dark green mineralization seen in sections of each piece as well. Both pieces have very little wear, were likely votive, and were both cast from the lost-wax process, while the wax model was formed in a two-piece mold. These pieces were made as a matching pair, and were possibly attached to a wooden sarcophagus, a burial garment, or the most likely, a leather belt. This type of piece is usually found in pairs, which may also tie in with the "master of the animals" cult that was associated with many cultures in the ancient Near East circa 1000-100 B.C. These plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, which was located in modern day Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. Most Ordos bronzes of this type can also be associated with the Xiongnu, who were a Mongolian steppes nomadic tribe that had to contend with the Chinese during the Han period. The term "Ordos bronzes" has been applied rather indiscriminately to all "animal style" objects found in the vast northern border areas with China, irrespective of place of discovery or dating. What is known is that the two plaques offered here stylistically match other examples found in Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. For the type see "Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes: The Eugene V. Thaw and Other New York Collections", Yale University Press, 2002. The pieces offered here show a standing animal which resembles a wolf, which is seen devouring it's prey, which appears to be a horned ibex. The horned ibex is seen with it's head in the mouth of the wolf, and it's curved horn is seen on the ground, as head of the ibex is seen turned around with a twisted elongated neck. In addition, the ibex may be a young baby animal, which may also explain the size difference between both the ibex and the wolf, but in reality, the ibex portrayed on these plaques may be an adult animal, and the carnivorous wolf may have been designed in an oversized manner to portray a more powerful creature. The wolf may also represent a "spirit animal" and may not be a wolf, but rather a creature that somewhat resembles a wolf or a feline. The creature portrayed here has a curled tail like a feline, and an elongated snout like a wolf, and the creature seen here may be a combination of both animals. The ibex head can also be best seen with the entire piece being viewed upside down, which is a convention of art that is common to the Ordos culture. (See attached close up photo.) This piece also has an attachment hook seen in the top center of the wolf's back, a small hole seen in the tip of the tail, and another hole designed within the ibex horn and front leg. These were the three points as to how this piece could have been attached to a leather belt with leather ties. These plaques have a very powerful image, and may have served as a "power type" piece for the wearer. Additional pieces of this type can be seen in "Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes" by Ariadne Galleries, New York, 1998. The pieces offered here are in superb to mint condition, have a high degree of eye appeal, and are better examples of this type that are normally seen. These pieces also are attached within an attractive black wooden framed shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1290942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1 inch wide, is ring size 6.5, and was made for a young man or woman. This ring has an oval shaped hoop, and this shape provided for a wide face that looks very large when worn on the finger. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today as well. This piece has sections of original gold gilt seen over the bronze, and this piece has a brilliant translucent orange carnelian stone that is firmly attached to the bronze bezel. The beautiful carnelian stone was never reattached to the ring, and it is firmly in place in it's original setting. The brilliant orange carnelian stone also has a carved image of a seated animal, possibly a dog or a fox. This animal is seen on a ground line, and has raised ears and a long curled tail. The brilliant orange carnelian stone is also highly polished, has an oval shape, a flat bottom, and is clear save for a small black inclusion that is deep within the stone. This piece was also used as a personal seal/signet ring, and makes a sharp impression. The condition of this piece is superb, and is intact with no repair/restoration, and has original gold gilt seen on the inner and outer surfaces of the bronze bezel. Overall, this attractive piece is in better condition than most examples of its type, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Inv. #P33-091-031915. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: