Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1367435
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This lovely Aztec/Mixtec tripod dates to the Late Postclassic Period, circa 1000-1450 A.D., and is approximately 4.2 inches high, with a diameter at the rim of 5.5 inches. This piece is intact, with no noticeable repair/restoration, and has a light polychrome slip in black, cream, and light red colors. This piece is a tripod bowl with flat plank extended legs that also extend past the outer diameter of the bowl, and because this design, this piece is very stable sitting on a flat surface. This piece also has an attractive black and red "line-designed" geometric pattern that runs around the outer edge of the bowl, and are likely spiritual in nature. In addition, there are raised "line-designed" symbols seen on the inner surface of the bowl, and these symbols are likely sacred as well. These symbols are also completely intact, and this is rare for vessels such as this, as the raised lines are often broken and have missing sections. This piece was also produced by the Mixteca people for the Aztec nobility who preferred these vessels for their food service vessels. It's also unknown whether these vessels were used to grind or abrade a foodstuff or other organic substance, or weather they served a solely ritual, service function. An interesting intact vessel that is becoming scarce in today's market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1181942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This interesting and lively Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This mint quality piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and minute root marking seen on the upper end of the spout and near the lower base of the vessel. This piece has a lively running deer, seen on each side of the vessel, and each deer faces a central dividing "double-bar" symbol which is seen at the front of the piece. This "double-bar" symbol may also represent a sacrificial "tumi", but more likely it simply is a "tie symbol", with a rope and/or cloth tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated Figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or scarifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". The dark red lively running deer are seen against a cream background, and are vibrantly portrayed with an upturned tail, a "floral-leaf" designed ear, an antler reaching forward at the top of the head, and a protruding hanging tongue. This piece also has a conical projection from the the top of the vessel, along with a seated frog that is seen centered at the top within a red fineline petal design, and the conical projection has an attached red stirrup handle seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial sacrificial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb I, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp. 96-97, fig. 10. See attached photo.) The ceremonial sacrificial club also is associated with the "tie symbol" and the lively running deer seen on this vessel, as they may represent deer that are portrayed as being part of a Moche ceremonial deer hunt. According to Christopher Donnan in "Deer Hunting and Combat", seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru", Thames and Hudson, 1997, p. 54-55: "Deer are known to run with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. No other animal in Moche art is shown in this way. Deer are known to run with their tongues out when they are winded or tired, and the artists may have intended to show them in this state. Moreover, when a deer is killed, the tongue will often drop out the side of the mouth through a gap that exists between the deer's incisor and molor teeth. In Moche deer hunting scenes, hunters consistently wear elaborate clothing, headdresses, and ornaments-attire that is altogether unsuited to the stalking and killing of deer. To understand why they are dressed this way, it is useful to consider the ethnohistoric records describing the great hunts practiced by the Inca. The best account is of a hunt held by the Inca ruler, Manco Inca, near the valley of Jauja in honor of Francisco Pizarro around 1536. On that occasion, 10,000 Indians formed a ring around an area 30 to 60 miles in circumference. They then closed toward the center, driving all the animals in the area before them, and forming several concentric rings as their circle grew smaller. When the circle was small enough, designated hunters entered it and killed as many animals as was desired." It's also quite possible that the deer seen on this vessel are portrayed at the point when they were ceremoniously killed, and that they were killed primarily for their blood for it's use in ceremony. In addition, the "floral-leaf" designed ear may also represent a deer's ear that has been engorged with blood from stressed running. The Moche placed a great deal of importance to the deer hunt, and the piece offered here shows artistic features that point to this fact. This mint quality piece is a scarce example of Moche fineline ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 279006, dated July 6th, 1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze knife handle in the shape of an amphora, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches high, by .75 inches wide, by .2 inches thick. This piece is a solid example and was cast as one piece, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is in the shape of a wine amphora, which has two handles attached to the upper shoulder, a fluted neck, and a wide rim. In addition, the lower body of the amphora displays a knobbed base. This piece is also decorated with several "punched concentric circles", which are also seen on both sides of the piece. This decorative element is a hallmark design of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on many bronzes from the period that display flat surfaces. There are also incised lines that cross over the body of the amphora. This attractive piece also served as a knife handle, and iron filling from the missing iron blade can still be seen within the opening at the top of the piece. This piece was likely a shaving razor, or perhaps held a punch tool extension. This piece also has an attractive light to dark green patina, with some spotty dark blue highlights. This piece also fits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. This piece can also be worn and fitted as a pendant, and this may also have been the case in antiquity. Ex: Fortuna Fine arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This exceptionally large piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very thick on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372975
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This dainty and mint conditioned Greek Attic kylix dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches high, by 6.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous black blaze and is seen on the outer and inner surfaces of the piece, save for the bottom of the vessel that has an unglazed section. This unglazed reserved section also has a "circle-and-dot" design element seen on the bottom center of the vessel. The shoulder of the piece is slightly offset, and is a well made example. This piece is also in flawless condition, with no repair/restoration, and has a great deal of muti-colored iridescence patina. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. A flawless Greek Attic vessel with nice eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1392002
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a Huari bowl that dates to the Middle Horizon period, circa 550-1050 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high, by 6.8 inches in diameter, and has white, black, dark orange, and dark red colors. This interesting piece has a flat bottom and an oval opening at the rim. This piece has a mirror image design that appears to be a "jugate-designed" type image, which are two heads back-to-back with a shared central white eye. This image also likely represents a sacred mythical creature that could be part feline, as there are also black dots seen within the design that could represent jaguar spots. There are also two raised bands that rise above the main design, and in addition, there are white and black dots that frame the entire image which may be celestial in nature. There is a "key pattern" that forms a ground line, and they also divide the vessel into two halves, along with a "chevron" pattern that is a hallmark design seen on Huari ceramics. This vessel could have been used in a sacred ceremony, and may also have served as a seed storage jar. This piece also has an ancient repair, as indicated by two bow-drilled holes that held a cord wrapping which held a crack together. This piece is complete, and has some minor crack fill seen mostly at the base that was done 30 plus years ago. This piece also has some attractive spotty white calcite deposits seen on the inside and outer surfaces. An interesting piece that has a very complex design. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378327
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This intact piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, is an intact example, and is a large example for the type. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, and has an attractive light green glaze. There is also an attached suspension hoop seen on the lower backside of the piece, and this piece was likely worn by an individual as a "protector" type amulet. The appealing bust of Ptah offered here also appears to be bald and/or is seen wearing a skull cap, and has deeply molded facial features that convey a slight smile with a serene expression. Ptah was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the ancient Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsmen. The piece seen here was not only likely worn as an amulet, but it was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This piece is in superb condition, has a nice even glaze, and is slightly bigger than most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398684
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive and complete piece is a Roman bronze hanging lamp that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This two-part piece is approximately 4.7 inches long, by 1 inch high for the main body of the lamp; and 4 inches long, by 2 inches high for the hanging nail hook. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with dark red highlights, and is in superb "as found" condition; as the hanging chain is complete, the hanging nail hook is intact, and the attachment lanyards on the lamp are intact. This piece was also cast as one piece, and the main body of the lamp has raised round circles at the bottom base which diffused heat. This lamp also has a double spout, and the hanging nail hook allowed this lamp to be extremely portable, and there is a distinct possibility that this lamp was made for a Roman legion that was on the move. It's also important to note that the chain, the hanging nail hook, and the main body of the piece are also contiguous, as evidenced by the matching patina seen on all of these pieces. A superb and complete hanging lamp not often seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1399734
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extra large and impressive piece is a Mayan brownware ceremonial tripod vessel that dates to the Early Classic Period, circa 450-650 A.D., and is approximately 13 inches in diameter, by 9 inches high. This impressive piece is a thick walled light to dark brown terracotta ceramic, that has three "slab type" legs attached to the flat base. This tripod bowl vessel is also somewhat heavy, and the three attached "slab type" legs have identical decorative architectural elements molded onto the outer surface of each leg. There are also three separate impressed panels with decorative elements that are seen on the outer surface of the bowl, and these panels are also identical, as they were made with a stamp that was rolled onto the outer surface of the bowl. These decorative elements show a two-part scene that is divided with a column, and to the right of the column, there is an elaborately attired standing figure with outstretched arms holding implements. The left side of the column shows a "central glyph medallion" flanked by winged motifs and stylized birds seen in profile. The "central glyph medallion" has three dots seen in the center, and this resembles the Mayan glyph meaning "moon". This "central glyph medallion" also appears to be attached to a raised stela that is also seen with three dots at the top. The stylized birds seen in profile at each side of the "central glyph medallion" are also of a raptor type with a hooked beak, and may represent either an eagle of a vulture which were both sacred to the Maya. There is also a stylized wavy band seen below. This type of heavy tripod bowl has strong Teotihuacan influence, and is a type of vessel that the Mayan produced in the Early Classic Period. This piece was often used in ceremony, and likely held an offering such as an agricultural commodity, or even a sacrificial head. A thick black glaze was also added at the bottom of this bowl in order to control a liquid, and this is the only glaze seen on this piece. The number "three" is seen multiple times on this piece with the three separate panels, the three "slab type" legs, the three dots seen within the "central glyph medallion", and the three dots seen at the top of the raised stela; and seen in combination, may have some other hidden ceremonial meaning. This impressive Mayan piece is complete, is 100% original, and has been repaired from several large fragments, as most "large scale" Mayan ceramics of this type have. There is also some minute root marking seen on the inside bottom of the bowl and some spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of the entire piece. An impressive "large scale" ceremonial type vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Palm Beach Atlantic College, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May, 1989, no. 377. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Veracruz/Mayan tripod plate vessel that dates to the Early Postclassic Period, circa 900-1200 A.D., and is approximately 12.4 inches in diameter, by 5 inches high. This piece is made from a dark red clay, and has a dark orange glaze that covers the entire piece. There are also three incised decorative boxes that are evenly spaced on the outer bowl, and these boxes have a dark gray/black glaze with cream colored incised lines. These boxes contain geometric patterns that may represent solar symbols, and these decorative elements are identical, save for the addition of a single circle added in Box B, seen with four circles, with yet another additional circle added in Box C, seen with five circles. Together, the three boxes likely represent a single complex concept, such as the movement of the planets, or perhaps representing a symbolic reference to the "Palenque Triad". There is also a symbol seen on the bottom central section of the bowl, and this may be a solar symbol and/or a sky symbol as well. This piece also has three rounded legs that are designed as a rattle, and all three legs are functional. There is also a slightly flared flat rim, with evenly spaced decorative black bands that are seen on the top flat rim surface. This piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration, and is in superb condition with a very vibrant glaze. In addition, there are some spotty black mineral deposits. (Another analogous piece of this type and size was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1990, no. 236. $1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also relatively scarce on the market not only for the type, but also for the intact condition. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1366326
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This mint quality Moche stirrup vessel depicting a lucuma fruit dates to the Moche IV Period, circa 400-600 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, by 4.25 inches in diameter, and has vibrant orange, dark red, black, and cream colors. This piece has a stirrup handle rising up from the center of the vessel, and the main body of the vessel depicts a very realistic opened lucuma fruit showing the dark reddish/brown seed within. The depiction of the lucuma fruit is very realistic in form, as well as with the color of the reddish/brown seed which in reality, is a glossy brown color. This piece is a votive ceramic, and likely was made to provide sustenance for the deceased in the afterlife. The Moche culture is also well known for it's realistic ceramic portraiture of actual individuals. The piece offered here is one of the best recorded examples of the lucuma fruit and is mint quality, with no repair/restoration. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,800.00
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful and even dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. (See attached photo.) The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. This piece is extremely rare, and so much so, it has also been labeled as "Teotino culture" by some pre-Columbian experts. In addition, this piece has been published as "Nazca (?) culture" by the Sakler Foundation, and has had extensive academic research and testing by their pre-Columbian academics, including Elizabeth Benson and Paul Clifford. The description of this published piece offered here, therefore follows the Sakler academic description as: Nasca (?), Peru, South Coast. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, circa 1970's, accession no. N-110. Published: "Art of the Andes", (As noted above), 1983, no. 143. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: