Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
Sort By:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian skyphos with olive painted design, approximately 2.25 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325706
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This very rare coin is a silver diobol attributed to the city mint of Kebren, Troas, in Asia Minor. This coin is dated circa 480-450 B.C., and is in about extremely fine condition (EF-/EF). This coin is approximately 1.3 gms, is 8mm in diameter, and has a dark gray patina. This coin features a bust of a female goddess facing left, and has "Archaic Period" type artistic style with a slight smile and braded hair. The reverse features a bust of a ram facing left, within an incuse punch square. The female bust on the obverse has been attributed as representing Apollo, but this image is likely a "Korai", as this bust is seen with earrings along with the long braded hair. The "Korai" were also female goddess that were prominently displayed in ancient Athens with the analogous female smiling faces as seen on this coin. Another example of this extremely rare coin was offered by Numismatica Ars Classica AG, Zurich, Switzerland, May 2017, Auction 100, no. 1119. (500 Swiss Francs estimate. This coin is also graded Very Fine Plus. VF+.) The attractive coin offered here is not only an extremely rare coin seldom seen on the market in this condition, but it is also a rare depiction of a "Korai" goddess. References: SNG von Aulock 1546; Rosen 534. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364645
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This nice piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the mid 5th century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.5 inches in diameter. This piece is in superb condition and is intact, save for a minor crack repair at the base of the vessel which is normal for a large vessel of this type. This attractive vessel has a trefoil spout, and a graceful upper shoulder that extends up from the rounded flat base. There is a heavy looped handle attached to this vessel, and was cast as one piece. This interesting handle was also designed so that the vessel could be suspended from a cord from the raised loop. The lower end of this heavy vertical handle terminates with a thick "ivy-leaf" that is attached to the side of the vessel. There are also two small openings, on each side of the handle near the upper rim, where the cord was attached, and these small openings could also have supported a hinged lid. This piece was also hand beaten from one solid sheet of bronze over a series of molds. This piece also has a beautiful dark to light green patina, with dark blue highlights, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece also easily stands upright, as it has a flat bottom, and the heavy handle was also designed into the upper center of the vessel. (A bronze hydria, dated to circa 450 B.C., with thick "ivy-leaf" terminating handles is seen in the Goulandris Collection in "Ancient Greek Art", Athens, 1996, no. 258. See attached photo.) This scarce vessel is an exceptional example for the type, and is also much rarer than ceramics of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is superb to mint quality "as found" condition, save for some minor glaze loss on one outer section of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374395
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This complete and intact piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Demeter that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, and is an intact and complete example that has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and was designed with a square base and a circular vent hole seen at the back. This nice piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece represents Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton, along with a himation that is draped over her shoulders. She is also seen holding a piglet to her chest with both hands, and is standing with her left knee slightly forward. She has a slight smile, and has a very serene overall look, as she is seen simply standing and facing the viewer. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and also depicts the animal offering (piglet) that was offered in a religious ceremony to a shrine or a temple. This piece by itself may also have served as a votive offering substitute as well. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2000. no. 84 for another analogous example of this type.) The piece offered here is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also attached to a custom wooden display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This extremely fine coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was likely minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Colophon, or possibly Abydus, and the identifying mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), and is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 4.3 gms (Attic Weight Standard), and has a very light gray patina. The obverse features a bust of Herakles facing right, and is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander the Great, and was likely intended to portray both Herakles and Alexander. The reverse features a seated Zeus, who is seen holding a standing eagle which was a messenger of the gods. The Macedonian star burst symbol is seen at the front of the seated Zeus, and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering is seen behind. The flan of this attractive piece is very large, and one can see the edge line of the die that runs around the outer edge of the obverse. The flan of this piece is larger than what one normally sees relative to this issue, and this coin also has perfect centering, along with extremely high relief on the obverse. The large flan size alone makes this coin a superb example, and is not often seen on the market. In addition, the seated Zeus does not have crossed legs and has an analogous design as the specimens attributed to Abydus show, and the Macedonian royal star is often seen on examples attributed to Colophon, according to Martin Price. References: This extremely rare coin has an example listed in Price, no. P113, and is listed as "minted circa 323-280 B.C.", and as "Uncertain of Western Asia Minor". It may also be that this rare issue may have been minted in Pergamon, shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, as this was the center of the so-called "Royalist" faction that supported the royal family after the death of Alexander. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb Greek vessel is a silver plate and/or shallow bowl that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, by 7 inches in diameter, by 1/16th inch thick on the average. This scarce piece has a dark gray patina, with some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits that are seen on both sides of the vessel, and in addition, is an intact mint quality vessel in "as found" condition. This piece is a solid, thick, and heavy silver plate and/or shallow bowl that has a beaded hammered edge, and has a slightly oval form. There is also a single attached silver ring handle that easily moves up and down within it's flat "leaf-shaped" mount. This allowed this plate and/or bowl to be hung either in a room, or in a mobile fashion from a wagon or horse. This piece was hammered over a mold, and has very minute micro marks and root marking. The overall design of this vessel is rare, especially with the added ring handle which appears to be original with this vessel. Greek silver vessels of this type with the added ring handle are also thought to be Greco-Thracian, and were often produced in Greek coastal centers for export. An analogous example is seen in "Silver for the Gods", Toledo Museum exhibition catalog, 1977, p. 82, no. 45. This piece is an exceptional heavy example for the type, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338480
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb quality Greek bronze coin (17mm) was minted in Pherai, and dates to the circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is graded EF+/EF+ (Superb quality), is approximately 17mm in diameter, and is scarce in this grade. This piece has on the obverse, the goddess Hekate facing right, wearing a laurel wreath and earring. The image of Hekate on ancient Greek coinage is rare, and is seldom seen. Hekate was called the daughter of Demeter or Pheraea, and was associated with the fertility of the ground. The ancient city of Pherai was also named after Pheraea as well. The reverse has a detailed head of a lion facing right with an open mouth, and the Greek lettering of PH-ERAI seen around the head of the lion. There is also water seen flowing forth from the lion's open mouth, and the image of the lion seen on this coinage may represent a public and/or sacred fountain. This piece also has an attractive even dark green patina, with some light dark green surface deposits. Pherai was a city located west of Mt. Pelion in Thessaly, and was the second largest city in ancient Thessaly after Larissa. Reference: Sear 2207. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre 1492 item #1268018
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 310 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Kantharos Group, and is approximately 8.25 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen on the top of the lid, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. There is also a large female head seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with the top section of a white and red wing that is seen curling up at the front of her face. The female head is also seen wearing a detailed sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with dotted and cross patterns, and is also wearing an elaborate earring and dotted necklace. This figure likely represents a winged "Eros", and this portrait type is also known as a "lady of fashion", and is thought by many academics to also represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the ancient Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has highly decorative floral patterns that are seen on each side of the lady's portrait, and a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle. This piece is better than most examples of it's type, and another analogous example of this type of vessel of nearly the same size and condition was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is among one of the best examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: G. van Driesum collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: