Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #590958
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare Greek glass Canosan plate dates from the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-3rd century BC. This piece was likely made in Canosa, Apulia, that is in southern Italy, and is a circular cosmetic plate. The vessel is approximately 6.25 inches in diameter by .8 inches high, and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or chips. This piece is surprisingly heavy for its size as well, as this piece was cast in a two-piece mold and was then smoothed by grinding and polishing. Cast glass is thicker and denser than glass that was free blown, and is more difficult to produce. With the advent of glass blowing technology that was perfected by the Romans, they were able to mass produce glass vessels in great numbers with a wide range of shapes. The earlier Greek cast glass was limited to mostly plates, bowls, and cups with added handles. There are very few Greek cast vessels in the marketplace today, as most ancient glass seen on the market is Roman blown glass. This piece is the one of the few extremely rare "Canosan" glass vessels that are currently on the market, and there have been only a very limited number of these cast glass vessels that have ever been offered at auction. This beautiful piece has subtle concentric circles that can be seen, and these were created from the grinding/polishing process. This piece is colorless with a light greenish tinge, and this color is the more common color for glass of this type. This color also matches the majority of the ten Canosan vessels that are now in the British Museum and were donated by the executors of Felix Slade in 1959. A shallow dish that is analogous to the piece offered here is from this group, and is seen in "Masterpieces of Glass" by D.B. Harden, British Museum Pub. 1968, p. 31, no.35. The piece offered here has a thick milky white patina that is adhered to the outer surface, and in places where this is missing, the glass has a multi-colored iridescence. There are also traces of minute root marking and mineral deposits. In "Early Ancient Glass", by Frederick Grose, Toledo Museum of Art, page 186 the following is seen: "To date, five hoards of glass vessels have been identified. Three are known to have been found in separate multichambered family tombs at Canosa; two are thought to have come from this locale but lack documentation. In addition, a few isolated examples from single burials can be attributed to the town. Elsewhere in Magna Graecia, vessels of the group have been found in Campania, at Reggio in Calabria, at Naxos and Morgantina on Sicily, and in Etruria. Outside Italy, sites in Greece, Asia Minor, along the Black Sea, and possibly Cyrenaica have also yielded examples. The number of recorded vessels of the group now stands at about sixty, illustrating a dozen main forms and variants, (see Fig.92)". The vessel offered here is of the type illustrated in Figure 92 as noted above, and is a a rarer form for a circular cosmetic plate, as most of the known examples have upturned rims. (For a Greek Hellenistic light green-tinted cast bowl of the same shape as the piece offered here, although it has a ring base at the bottom and is approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, see: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 152. $6,000.00-$9,000.00 estimates.) If you are a collector of ancient glass, this may be one of the few opportunities to own an extremely rare Canosan glass vessel from this group and of this type. Ex: Hadji Soleimani collection, London, circa 1980's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385356
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek "Xenon ware" kantharos, and dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Greek Apulian pottery from southern Italy that also has Greek mainland attributes. This attractive piece has a beautiful deep black glaze, a ring base, looped handles, and a dark orange painted box on each side that features various ivy tendrils and wave designs. There is also some nice minute spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on this mint quality vessel that has no repair and/or restoration. This vessel is scarce in this condition, and is a better example that what is usually seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74 (var.). SNG Copenhagen 1046 (var.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This large piece is a Greek Attic "Black-figure" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C., and is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 11 inches wide from handle to handle. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has an even dark glossy black glaze. This lustrous black glaze is seen on the inner and outer surfaces, save the bottom of the kylix that has a light red terracotta reserve. The surfaces also have an attractive multi-colored iridescence patina seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is a dark orange and black palmette tondo seen in the bottom center of the vessel. This piece also has a ring base, and an offset shoulder seen on the inside of the vessel. An analogous example was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, May, 1987, no. 258. ($400.00-$700.00 estimates, and is a smaller example.) A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360626
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely large Greek lead "sling-bullet" dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 2.25 inches long, by 1.35 inches wide, by .7 inches high. This piece is extremely large for the type, as most examples have an average size of approximately 1-1.4 inches long, by .7 inches wide. This massive scarce to rare piece was cast in a mold, is solid lead, and is a very heavy example. This weapon also has an almond shape, as most lead "sling-bullets" have, and this shape provided a stable aerodynamic flight, an easy extraction from a mold, and enabled this piece to more easily stay in the sling cradle without rolling out. This piece also has a lengthy inscription on one side, with seven to nine letters, and the other side has an image of a thunderbolt. The inscription may name a city, an individual, or it may convey an insult such as "take this". The inscription has not been translated, as some of the letters are not clear, and the inscription may also have abbreviations built into the one line of letters. This piece has a light gray patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a complete example. This piece also has some dents and minor gouges, and some of these imperfections were likely a result from impacts from battle, as there is a thick patina seen over some of these imperfections. This piece is scarce to rare in this large size, and is a piece that best represents this type of ancient weapon. This interesting piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383243
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic kylix that dates circa 450 B.C., and is approximately 7.65 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and has a deep black glaze on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a dark orange reserve with a black dot and concentric circles on the bottom, and four incised letters (N-T-I-N) that likely represent the name of the "owner" of the vessel. In addition, there are two heavily incised letters (A-A) seen below one of the looped handles, and these may represent "control" marks from the kiln and/or exporter. There are also mold pressed designs seen on the inner surface of the bowl. This intact piece has some spotty glaze loss, and has some additional features, as noted above, that are not normally seen on a vessel of this type, and as such, is a scarce to rare example. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363891
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek silver cup that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.9 inches high, by 4.65 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This beautiful piece has a flat bottom, and easily stands by itself. This attractive piece also has a slightly flared rim, and graduates in size down to the flat base, and overall, this piece has a very esoteric shape and a high degree of eye appeal. This vessel also has a light to dark gray patina with some attractive spotty light gray mineral deposits. These attractive mineral deposits are not only a mark of authenticity, but they also show that this piece has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. There is also some minute root marking and scratches, which is normal for a vessel of this type, and there is no repair/restoration. This piece may also have been produced in ancient Thrace, and may also have been produced for the Scythian market. For the type see: D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 84-86. The piece offered here is scarce to rare, and overall, is a superb example seldom seen in this condition on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece has two sections that are both intact, and no repair/restoration. In addition, there are no minute cracks seen in both sections, and there are some heavy white calcite deposits with some attractive root marking that is seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This esoteric pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel, and is of a type and form that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1346703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze amulet that is seen in the form of the Greek goddess Baubo, and dates circa 5th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high by .65 inches wide, and is a complete example with no restoration/repair. This complete piece has a nice dark green patina with some light brown deposits, and is a solid cast example that likely served as a wearable amulet that hung from a necklace. This piece has a suspension hoop seen at the top of the head of the goddess, who is seen nude with her hands on her knees, and is revealing her over-sized vulva. The goddess Baubo was a fun-loving, bawdy, jesting, sexually liberated - yet very wise - goddess who played a crucial role in preserving the fertility of the land in ancient Greece. According to ancient Greek myth, Baubo stopped to rest in the city of Eleusis and had a conversation with the depressed Demeter, who was in deep mourning over the loss of her daughter Persephone who was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter abandoned her duties to bring fertility back to the land, until Baubo began chatting with Demeter using risqué remarks that brought a smile back to Demeter's face. Then, Baubo suddenly lifted her skirt revealing her vulva to Demeter who responded with a hearty belly laugh. Demeter's spirits were uplifted, and she was then able to persuade Zeus to release Persephone, which restored the fertility of the land. The piece offered here may have been worn by a woman, and/or a person who was also connected with the Eleusinian Mysteries. The followers of Baubo believed that enmity could be turned into friendship, and that all people are an integral part of the great cycles of nature. This piece is a scarce to rare example, and is a solid example that can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1309661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 9.8 inches in diameter by 2.25 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this beautiful vessel has an attractive bust of a young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. Her facial features also have a better artistic style than what is normally seen on Apulian pieces of this type, and one can easily see that the simple facial lines convey the look of a young woman. There is also a dotted plate seen at the front of the bust, and a white and yellow fan behind. This piece also displays a thick white stroke seen above the forehead, and a white comb above, which are hallmark attributes of the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. There is also a dark orange wave pattern, a white floral-leaf pattern, and a single red line that frames the bust of the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a lustrous black painted reserve at the bottom, along with a raised footed base. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking. This piece is also analogous to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. For the type attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter see A.D Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1353952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This extremely rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF) condition, weighs 5.0 grams, and is approximately 21mm in diameter. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing left, a monogram at the lower front of the bust, and a Greek legend below and behind. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing left, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The legend seen on the obverse is extremely rare, and may refer to the magistrate that minted the coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. This coin may also be the only known recorded example with this obverse legend, in addition to, the bust of Zeus that is seen facing left which is seldom seen as well. The reverse legend refers to the Epirote Republic itself. The artistic style of the Zeus bust also has an extremely high degree of art, and is a better style that what is usually seen on the scarce coinage of this type. Another example of this coin type, without the obverse legend and the Zeus bust facing right, was sold by Numismatica Ars Classica in Zurich, Switzerland for 1,300 SF. The coin offered here is not only an extremely rare type, but is also in extremely fine condition. References: Franke, Epirus, 32ff (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374395
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This complete and intact piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Demeter that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, and is an intact and complete example that has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and was designed with a square base and a circular vent hole seen at the back. This nice piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece represents Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton, along with a himation that is draped over her shoulders. She is also seen holding a piglet to her chest with both hands, and is standing with her left knee slightly forward. She has a slight smile, and has a very serene overall look, as she is seen simply standing and facing the viewer. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and also depicts the animal offering (piglet) that was offered in a religious ceremony to a shrine or a temple. This piece by itself may also have served as a votive offering substitute as well. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2000. no. 84 for another analogous example of this type.) The piece offered here is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also attached to a custom wooden display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1399107
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare and extremely large Cycladic "Stargazer" Kilia type marble head dates circa 3300-2500 B.C., and is approximately 3.75 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high. This piece was once part of a complete standing idol, and the dating of these idols is difficult, although it is clear that they belong to the late Chalcolithic Period. This piece is an extremely large example, as most examples are less than half the size of the piece offered here, and as such, is a rare to extremely rare example. This piece was broken at the top of the neck, and has a break at the back of the head, and is a head that is approximately 80% complete. The popular name of "stargazer" comes from the obvious backward tilt of the head, and the small bulging eyes are set rather high. Most of the extremely rare complete idols have been broken across the neck, as seen here, suggesting that these sculptures were ritually "killed" at the time of burial. The exact function of these idols is unknown, but the design of these pieces do evoke a sense of modern design with a simplistic artistic style. This piece has a very defined raised nose, and there is small flat section at the base of this bust where it was attached to the neck of the figure. This piece also has spotty and heavy dark gray mineral deposits; and at the break at the back of the head, along with the neck break at the base of the head, the marble is crystallized with some light gray deposits. The patina seen on the break at the back of the head is also an indication that this extremely large piece was not only broken away at the neck, but is was also ritually "killed" with an extra break at the back of the head. This esoteric piece has a custom display stand which shows this piece as it would have looked attached to the main body of the piece. (For the type see: Takaoglu, Turan. "A Chalcolithic Marble Workshop at Kulaksizlar in Western Anatolia: An Analysis of Production and Craft Specialization", BAR International Series 1358, Oxford Archaeopress, 2005.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which are not very noticeable, and overall, this piece is a solid example that can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: