Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338941
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This attractive Egyptian wooden mummy mask dates to the Third Intermediate Period, 21st-24th Dynasty, 1070-715 B.C. This esoteric piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 4.5 inches wide, by 3 inches deep. This piece was likely from the inner coffin lid of a large sarcophagus. This piece is also solid, and has original light red and black paint over stucco that is adhered to the wooden surface on the front side of the piece. The paint and stucco are both very stable, and there is no flaking or recent cracking of the paint and stucco. This piece has no over paint, is all original, and there has not been any repair/restoration to the piece. This piece has a very esoteric artistic style, and is a much more beautiful piece that what is normally seen for a piece of this type for the period. The eyes are almond shaped, and the mouth has a very sensual look and design. The overall face has a serene expression that this piece easily conveys to the viewer. This piece has a flat back side that is slightly oval, and there is an attachment dowel seen at the top back side, and in addition, this dowel attached this facial section to the main part of the mask. This piece also has very high relief, and the nose is completely intact, along with most of the facial features. Egyptian wooden face masks from this period with the exceptional esoteric artistic style that this piece conveys, have sold for very strong prices in todays market. Another analogous example of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities: "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", New York, Dec. 2004, no. 71. ($50,000.00-$70,000.00 estimates. The Pankow example is slightly larger than the piece offered here, and the facial details are very close in design as well. The piece offered here has a very analogous mouth as the Pankow example, along with the delicate designed nose. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a wonderful example for the type, and is difficult to find with this esoteric artistic style. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Ex: Farag Khodary M. El-Gabry, Cairo, circa 1950's. Ex: Dora and George Mathues collection, Philadelphia, circa 1960's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", Dec. 2004, no. 148. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1381237
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact Romano-Egyptian terracotta fish that dates to the Roman Period, circa 30 B.C.-324 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece was made with a dark red-tan clay, and was mold made from two halves. This attractive piece also some thick gray-white deposits, which was also made from it's original white gesso that coated the entire piece. This piece has a curved body that creates movement for the viewer, and there is an open mouth, a small vent hole under the body, and detailed fins. This piece was also likely a votive object that provided sustenance for the departed in the after-life, and this type of piece is also relatively scarce on the market. This piece also likely depicts a Nile perch, which was a popular fish in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1375947
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These pieces are nineteen (19) Egyptian faience glazed amulets that are from the Amarna-Period, Late New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, circa 1350 B.C., and also date to the reign of Akhenaten and Tutankhamun. These interesting and attractive pieces range in size from approximately .9 to .25 inches high, and are all intact, save one plaque amulet that has a chip on one side. Nine (9) of the amulets have a minute suspension hoop at the top, and were likely strung together on a necklace or interwoven into a garment. The remaining amulets were likely interwoven and/or wrapped into a garment, and may have also been interwoven into the wrappings of a mummy, as this was likely the case for all of the amulets offered here. The amulets vary in type, glaze color, and size which makes them a very interesting study group. A lotus flower, a palmette, a Wedjat-eye, a seated Sekhmet, and a Hes-Vase represent some of the examples offered here. Many of these amulet types are seen in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. The mold made amulets offered here also range in color from a bright blue glaze to a dark purple-blue color. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1410476
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This intact and superb faience Egyptian shabti dates to the Late Period, 26th Dynasty, circa 664-525 B.C., and is approximately 6.9 inches high. This esoteric green glazed shabti is intact, and has no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a very esoteric face with a slight smile and detailed molded body features. This piece is a mummiform standing figure with a tripartite wig, with a seed bag slung over his left shoulder, and is seen holding a pick and a hoe. This piece also stands upright by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and a dorsal pillar is seen on the backside. This piece also has a thick even green glaze, and there are also attractive spotty light brown mineral deposits seen on various sections of this piece. Overall, a very attractive and large example for the type. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Major James Findlay collection, Aberdeen, Scotland, circa 1950's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including UK Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1402763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This Romano-Egyptian micro-mosaic cut glass tile is a bust of Horus, and dates to the Ptolemaic Period, circa 332-31 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.3 cm high, by 1.1 cm wide, by .02 cm deep, and is a complete example with no repair and/or restoration. This rare and exceptional example depicts Horus, the Egyptian falcon-headed god, and is seen in profile with white cheeks, black feathers, a red spotted eye and beak detail, and a green and white striped chest detail, all set against a cobalt blue background. Glass micro-mosaics, like this piece, were made in long canes which were then cut into sections that all showed the same image. This piece also has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and is an exceptional example, as it also has vibrant colors and the bust of Horus is seldom seen relative to pieces of this type. This piece is also translucent, especially with the cobalt blue background that frames the image of Horus. (Another example of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "The Groppi Collection", London, April 2012, no. 87. The Groppi example may also be from the same workshop as the piece offered here, as the design of Horus is analogous in terms of design and the use of the colored glass.) Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This pleasing piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C., and is approximately .75 inches high. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, who was a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsman. This piece had a suspension hoop at the backside, and was worn as a "protector" type amulet. The piece offered here has a thick dark green glaze, and has a detailed face with a serene smile. Ptah is also seen wearing a skull cap, although he appears to be bald. This superb conditioned bust is complete, save for the missing left ear, and has a realistic and better facial expression that most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384943
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This rare Egyptian faience amulet is a facing panther head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.2 inches wide from ear to ear, by .4 inches thick, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This intact piece is also a complete example, and is in superb condition, save for some minute stress cracks on the front face, and a small area of glass loss on the lower left back side. This piece has a light green glaze, a flat back, and has a molded and detailed panther head on the front side. A hole runs through the center from top to bottom, and there are two additional mounting holes seen on each side of the center hole at the top of the piece. (The piece offered here is very analogous in artistic style to the carved facing panther head seen on the basalt statue of Anen, who served as an astronomer priest under Amenhotep III, and is now seen in the Turin Egyptian Museum, Italy. See attached photos.) The panther head is a regal symbol, and attached with the panther skin robe with stars, together represented the attributes of an astronomer. Egyptian regal princes were trained in astronomy so that they could predict the rising and falling of the Nile. The piece offered here likely was part of a regal necklace, is one of the rarest Egyptian amulet types, and is not often seen on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand that is included. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this complete piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This solid piece can also be easily mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece as it was done in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1359731
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze slashing sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This remarkable piece is approximately 21.4 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide at the point where the blade meets the shank of the weapon. This piece was hand forged into one piece from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This powerful weapon also has a blade that slightly graduates in width from the shank to the blunt end, and this blade section of the weapon is slightly curved. The straight rectangle shaped "extended shaft" is also very durable, and is approximately .5 inches wide at the shank, by .25 inches thick. This weapon's "extended shaft" also slightly graduates in size, mostly with the width, from the shank to the end of the handle. The cutting edge of the blade is also only on one side, as the blunt end is flat, along with the top side of the blade. Overall, this weapon is very finely made for the period, and has subtle dimensions of construction which makes it a very special and specialized work of ancient arms. This weapon was designed to slash through an enemy with one sweeping motion, and an extended "wooden shaft handle" would have allowed this weapon to be held with one or two hands. This design also allowed this weapon to likely be able to penetrate heavy armor such as a helmet or a breastplate, as the "extended shaft" attached to an extended "wooden shaft handle" would allow one to generate a tremendous amount of force. This weapon may also have been designed for use from a chariot or horseback, as the owner would be able to slash in a downwards motion, which would have generated even more force than a horizontal slash. This weapon may also be of a type that was used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with some red highlights, and some spotty light to dark green mineralization. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and has an ever so slight bend at the shank which may indicate that this piece was in battle. This weapon is extremely rare, is a highly specialized work of ancient arms, and is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This attractive and extremely rare piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of extremely large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378327
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This intact piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, is an intact example, and is a large example for the type. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, and has an attractive light green glaze. There is also an attached suspension hoop seen on the lower backside of the piece, and this piece was likely worn by an individual as a "protector" type amulet. The appealing bust of Ptah offered here also appears to be bald and/or is seen wearing a skull cap, and has deeply molded facial features that convey a slight smile with a serene expression. Ptah was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the ancient Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsmen. The piece seen here was not only likely worn as an amulet, but it was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This piece is in superb condition, has a nice even glaze, and is slightly bigger than most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: