Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is generous in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This Roman silver eagle is nothing short of a masterpiece. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C. to the 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #862556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a bronze ring that is from the Luristan culture that dwelled in Western Iran, circa 1000-800 B.C., Iron Age II. This object was cast as one solid piece, is approximately 4.9 inches in diameter, and is very heavy, as it is approximately .5 inches thick. This beautiful piece is in superb condition and has an exceptional dark green patina with light brown and reddish highlights. This massive adornment was worn above the bicep on the upper arm, and was considered to be a very valuable object by this culture. This piece was likely clamped on the upper arm of a warrior individual who wore this piece for life, and this piece has a high degree of smooth wear on the inner surfaces, which is a good indication that the owner wore this piece for a considerable length of time. The Luristan culture was a tribal society of mixed small-scale agriculturalists and pastoralists, raising sheep and goats, many horses, and perhaps using chariots where the terrain permitted. The wealth of this culture was concentrated in the hands of a warrior aristocracy who patronized the metal smiths, and they considered bronze very valuable, as it could be fashioned over and over again into weapons. This culture was highly skilled in the arts of war, and perhaps only the Spartans could have been as skilled in the use of their weapons. This piece has attractive decorative chevrons and checker-band patterns that were engraved into the metal. These designs are also seen on the ceramics for the period. (For other bronze armlets of this type see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals" by P.R.S. Moorey, Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, nos. 611-613.) A custom stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
$635.00
This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #943369
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This piece is a superb Roman silver ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is solid silver and was cast as one piece, then it was chased and cold worked after the casting. This piece is approximately a size 8, is 7/16 inches wide at the top, and has a light grey patina. There is some very minute wear on the inner surface which can be seen under magnification, and this is a good indication of authenticity. This piece has two stylized heads that come together in the center, and these resemble dolphin heads, but may be cow/bull heads as well. These heads are so stylized that they could be spirit animals as well, and as such, this piece could have originally come from the ancient Roman regions of Thrace or Germania, where many ancient animal cults were active into the Roman period. This ring could be either a "protector" type ring, or a "power" type ring that captured the power of the animal. This piece is very durable, as it was cast as a solid piece, and can easily be worn today. This piece comes with a gift box and a custom ring stand. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,800.00
This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #593672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This extremely fine Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece circa 460-430 BC. This coin weighs 3 grams and has a light gray patina. The obverse has a facing bull, and the reverse, features the head of Artemis with the hair bound with a fillet. The bull probably represents a sacrificial bull. The letters of Phokis are seen around the head. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This coin is a mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), Thasos silver tetradrachm, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club and cloaked in the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "Herakles"; and below reads "Thasos", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1147979
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare to scarce piece is an Attic Greek beaker/mug that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-725 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, and is slightly larger than most recorded examples. This piece is also intact and has no repair/restoration, no overpaint, and no stress cracks that run within the vessel. The handle is completely intact, and this is rare for an early Attic Greek vessel of this type, as most examples have damage and/or repair to the handle or the area where the raised handle attaches to the body. This piece is also in its "as found" condition, with some very slight wear to one side, and there are spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel which also mask some of the dark brown line design. This piece has dark brown cross hatched designs, with dots below, that run around the center of the vessel, and singular line design that runs up the length of the handle. This vessel is a light tan terracotta, and has a flat bottom with a slightly flared lip. This piece was also likely produced in Athens for the export market. This piece is very analogous in shape and size to the Heidi Vollmoeller Collection piece that was offered by Christie's Antiquities, South Kensington, London, Oct. 2003, lot no. 519. (See attachment.) There have been very few of these Attic Greek Geometric Period pieces on the market, and they are rare to scarce, especially in this intact condition. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1163826
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,375.00
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian cut glass bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.8 inches in diameter, and is slightly larger than most examples of this type. This mint quality exceptional piece also has one of the best patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has a thick honey brown encrusted patina that is seen over a pale green glass, and there are attractive spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits seen on the outer surface. This thick-walled piece has seven registers that run around the vessel from top to bottom, and there is one large circle at the bottom that forms the base. The top five registers have a "diamond-cut" pattern, and the bottom two registers have a "circular-cut" pattern. The entire vessel was cut from one solid block of glass, and was skillfully cut with the patterns that are seen on the outer surface of the vessel. The patterns are all nearly the same size, and a great deal of skill was required to produce a cut vessel of this type. A much higher degree of skill was needed to produce a cut vessel of this type, relative to the numerous Roman blown glass vessels. In addition, this beautiful piece is rarer than the more common examples that entirely have "circular-cut" pattern registers, as opposed to this rarer vessel that has "diamond-cut" pattern registers. A slightly smaller analogous Sasanian bowl was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 396 (L4,500.00-L6,700.00 pounds estimates, L5,000.00 pounds realized.) An analogous bowl of this type and size is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New york, 1977, p. 159, no.82.). One of the finest vessels of it's type, as it is in a mint "as found" condition with a thick honey-colored mineralized patina. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.