Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is in a mint "as found" condition, although there is some glaze loss seen mostly on the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #782558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This nice Greek ceramic is cup that is intact and it is an attractive form. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek art from southern Italy and Greek art from Attica (mainland Greece). This piece was produced circa 375-350 B.C. and is a glossy blackware with matt pinkish red designs. Xenon ware usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. This piece has a key pattern that runs around the center of the vessel, with chevron lines above. The condition of this intact piece in mint, and has no minute breaks and/or chips. The key design is missing in sections, and this is common, as the paint was often added after the ceramic was fired and/or was a thin application. This piece has not been over painted as well. There are some spotty white calcite deposits, and some root marking. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and is a superb example for the type. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little piece is an Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is superb to mint quality, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This superb to mint piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This Roman silver eagle is nothing short of a masterpiece. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C. to the 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150248
Apolonia Ancient Art
$198.00
This extremely fine coin is a late Roman bronze 1/2 Centenionalis, 20 mm, that was minted by the Roman emperor Constans circa 348-350 A.D. Flavius Julius Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I (the Great) and Fausta, born 320 A.D. He later shared the empire with his two brothers, Constantine II and Constanyius II., and later was raised to the title of "Augustus" circa 337-350 A.D. In 348-350 Constans carried out a reform of the bronze coinage, and the coin offered here falls within this period. The obverse shows the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Constans facing right, with the legend: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG around. The line design of the hair is seen in very sharp detail. The reverse ahows a standing Phoenix facing right with a rediate crown, standing on a pyre, with the legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO around, ASIS below. The Phoenix seen standing on the reverse is also one of the few examples of a Phoenix bird that is seen on Roman coinage, and this is a rare symbol relative to Roman numismatics. This coin has a glossy dark green patina, and is EF/EF- grade. (Another example was recently sold by CNG, Auction 279, May 2012, no. 635, for $204.00.) This coin has a rare Roman symbol, and is a scarce Roman coin type. Sear 4009, R.I.C. 332. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #984306
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb coin is a hemidrachm that was minted circa 390-370 B.C. This coin was minted in the civic mint of Neapolis, and grades extremely fine in condition (EF/EF). Neapolis developed as an Athenian colony, and was important because of the rich silver mines that were in the region. Neapolis was located on the coast of the Greek mainland directly opposite the island of Thasos. The obverse is a facing Gorgon that has an open mouth with a protruding tongue, and this was the civic symbol of Neapolis. The Gorgon was the Greek mythical beast that turned men into stone. There is also a single dot seen below the cheek of the Gorgon, and this may be an indication of value. The reverse has a delicate young female head facing right, that has been classified by many numismatists as being a young nymph. It is my contention that this young female head is Artemis Parthenos, who was a goddess that was popular in the wild interior of this region. This head is rendered with exceptional detail, as one can easily see individual hairs and a delicate single strand necklace. There is also Greek lettering seen running around the head: N-E-O-II. This coin is approximately 1.88 gms, and is 14mm in diameter. (Another example of the same grade was offered by Freeman & Sear, Fixed Price List 11, June 2006, no. 28, for $1,500.00.) Die references: Sear 1417, Jameson 954, and Dewing 1067. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #854857
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This impressive piece is a Hellenistic Greek silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C. to the early 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several strands of silver in an intricate interwoven pattern, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .39 inches in diameter. The clasp is made from bronze and is very durable and can be used even today. There are two cylindrical terminal ends which attach to the bronze clasp, and these terminal ends have an attractive wire band "S" type pattern within. This "S" type pattern is a Hellenistic Greek convention of art as well. The central round hoop also has this pattern, and the round hoop may have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could only have been owned by a wealthy individual, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a valuable material in antiquity. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as well as today, because of it's intrinsic visual appeal. There is also a small ancient repair seen on one side of the chain, and this piece may have been broken and subsequently repaired because of civil unrest. Another example of this type of piece was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62 (L3,500.00-L5,500.00 Pounds estimates.). The Christie's example cited here is also from the same collection as the example offered here, and both of these pieces are analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The piece offered here may easily be worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central round hoop. This piece is also a nice collectable as a piece of ancient jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This silver piece has an attractive dark grey patina and the bronze hoop has a nice light green patina. A custom necklace case is included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. and is a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are an added plus towards the value of the piece. The patina is absolutely gorgeous and is dark green with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is also very desirable, and is another added plus towards the value of this piece. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze and was hammered into shape. This piece was finished with exceptional repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "classical period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian empire) deep bowl. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. This piece is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter by 3 inches high, is thick walled, and is a large example. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece was also probably used for formal wine drinking known as symposia. A plexiglas stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora which dates to the 2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1144158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Aphrodite that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece also has several earthen deposits, and is in its intact "as found" condition. This light tan terracotta figure is a nude Aphrodite, who is seen raising her right arm and holding her drapery behind, and her lower right arm is seen holding or resting on an extended dolphin, with its head pointing downwards. This dolphin may also represent a piece of dolphin-designed furniture. The dolphin seen at her side also refers to the ancient Greek myth of the birth of Aphrodite, as she sprang from the foam of the sea. She is also seen on a rectangular stand, and there is a small round vent hole seen on the back side. This attractive piece was mold made from two seperate halves, and is a typical example of a Greek Boeotian terracotta, but this piece has a totally nude highly erotic pose which is not often seen . This type also is found during the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C., and is sometimes classified as being "Roman", but the example seen here is an early Greek example. Another analogous Greek example, dating circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., of the same size and molding is seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2006, no. 114. ( 500-700 Pound estimates, 840 Pound/$1,512.00 realized.) This piece also stands by itself, and sits on a custom black plexiglas and wooden stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #941556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian brown terracotta mold that was likely used to form a faience amulet. This intact piece is approximately 1.6 inches high, is intact with no repair/restoration, and dates to the Late Period, circa 716-30 B.C. This piece shows the standing figure of the pregnant hippopotamus-headed goddess Thoeris, otherwise known as Taweret, who the the protector of women during childbirth. The image of this goddess is often seen as faience amulets, and an image of this goddess was also attached to beds, head-rests, and cosmetic articles. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom stand, along with a clay impression of the mold, and both of these can easily be removed. Molds of this type are scarce on the market, and are seldom seen. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: