Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #685120
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long by 2.25 inches high. This piece is solid and was cast as one complete piece. This scarce piece is probably Greek, as examples of this type have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. These pieces were votive in nature and this is why they have been found at these sacred Greek sites. (See H.V. Herrmann, Die Kessel der Orientalalisierenden Zeit, Teil I, OlympForsch VI, 1966, no.114. for an analogous example that was found at Olympia.) This piece has a round almond eye and the tail is designed between the hind legs, and these are features that are seen in Greek art during the early Geometric period, circa 8th century B.C. Pieces of this type have been found in Anatolia and northern Syria, and have been found in many locations in the ancient Greek world. This is why pieces of this type are classified as being "Anatolian" and/or "Northern Syrian", but it probably is the case that many of these pieces may also have been made in Greece, and one probable site is Olympia. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was extensive trade between Greece and the the Levant (eastern Mediterranean). This piece has a dark green and brown patina with dark green mineral deposits. The design of this piece is also very analogous to another example that is seen in the Munich Glyptothek Museum (See attached photo.) The piece offered here, and the Glyptothek Museum example, are both approximately the same size as well, and both have short cropped horns, incised line design on the flat forehead, and a round almond eye. The bull also appears to be pulling back with the weight of his body, as a domesticated animal would do, and this may also explain the cropped horn design of this piece. This type of a solid cast bronze votive bull is scarce, and is not often seen on the market. This piece is also from a private Swiss collection. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich. Published:"More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection" by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no.17. Ex: Christie,s Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no.372.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1253763
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman gladius sword that dates to the mid/late Roman Republican period, circa 140-20 B.C. This stunning piece is approximately 26.25 inches long, from the tip to the end of the tang, and the blade is approximately 23 inches long, from the tip to the top of the hilt. The blade is also approximately 1.2 inches wide at the hilt, and gradually increases in width to the distinctive v-point tip, which is 1.45 inches wide at this point. The blade is made from hammered iron, and is in remarkable superb condition for an iron blade, and there are no noticeable breaks and/or major repairs to the blade. (See included x-ray.) The blade has some minor iron bubbles, which is normal for a blade of this type, and the overall blade was conditioned circa 1980's with a heavy dark brown oil based glaze which has sealed the metal, and provided for an excellent state of preservation. The blade, with the additional width near the v-tip, gave this weapon added weight and made a slashing blow even more effective. The well defined v-tip, which is a prominent feature of the Roman gladius, allowed for stabbing during close combat, and allowed one to get by an opponent that perhaps had a large shield and/or was in a dense formation. The blade edges are also very sharp in sections, and there is a raised central line that runs from the tip to the hilt. This raised central line shows that the blade was hammered over and over again, in order to create a superior weapon that had dense metal and a thicker and stronger mid-section. The blade also has an added decorative plate which has silvered bronze and gold gilt, with decorative cross-patterned punched dotted designs. The edge of this plate has added gold gilt over bronze brackets, which protected the blade when it was taken in and out of it's scabbard. This piece also comes with a distinctive Roman type frame scabbard, that has edge brackets, two support cross pieces, and an enclosed scabbard tip plate. The tip plate is rounded, rather than pointed, which is a rare feature relative to Roman arms, and the plates are also gold gilt over bronze with some silvering added as well. The silvering over the bronze is also a Roman convention of art, and Roman Helmets from the Republic period to the late Imperial period often have silvering applied over bronze or traces it are often seen over the metal. This type of metal application is also known as "tinning", and is a combination of silver and other base metals. The tip plates also have a matching decorative design as the hilt plates seen on the blade, and this design is only seen on the front plate, and the back plate is flat with no designs and has gold gilt over the bronze with no silvering. The overall scabbard precisely fits the blade, and the scabbard had a thin inner and outer leather liner which protected and enclosed the blade within the scabbard. The scabbard also runs two thirds up the blade, and the scabbard may be missing the upper third section, or this section may have been made with a combination of wood and leather. The upper scabbard section may also have been fitted with ring attachments that fitted this piece to a belt with leather ties. There is also a three way "junction phalera" which may have fit into this leather tie attachment system as well. The three way "junction phalera" may or may not have gone with this gladius, but it is thought that all of the pieces offered here were found together in the United Kingdom circa early 1980's. The three way "junction phalera" also date circa late 3rd-2nd century B.C., and has three glass paste circular inlay circles with dotted pattern pins than run from the center. This design is a Celtic type design, and its possible that this piece was made by a Celtic armorer in the service of the Romans in Gaul. The rounded tip plates on the scabbard also are seen in Gaul relative to armor produced by the native La Tene culture, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., as cataloged by F. Quesada Sanz, in "Gladius Hispaniensis: An Archaeological view from Iberia", Journal of Roman Military Equipment Studies, 8, 1997, pp. 251-270. (See attached chart from the above reference showing the evolution of the early Republican gladius sword types, p. 265, Fig. 16.) According to the chart noted above, the sword type offered here is very analogous in size and shape to the Roman gladius sword no. 12, which was found in Delos in 1986 still within it's fragmented frame scabbard. This sword is simply known as the "Delos Sword", and Michel Feugere in "The Arms of the Romans", p. 32, has dated this sword circa 69 B.C. This sword is also one of the few Roman Republic gladius swords that have been found and recorded, and this is the case of the extremely rare piece offered here. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C. The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus grade. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is in a mint "as found" condition, although there is some glaze loss seen mostly on the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #599095
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This superb Roman bronze piece is an applique with the image of Silenus. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., and is in the form of a facing head, with an attached peg that extends about 1.5 inches from the back side of the applique. This piece was probably mounted in an object such as a furniture piece, or a bronze and wooden door, or a composite work or arms such as a Roman shield. A piece with this type of design, with the extended peg, could have fit in a number of objects. The Sileni were native not to Greece, but to Phrygia in Roman Asia, and personified the genii of springs and rivers. Unlike the Satyrs who derive chiefly from the he-goat, the Sileni derive rather from the horse, whose tail hooves, and even ears they possess. This piece clearly shows the horse ears and shows Silenus as a fat old man, snub-nosed, always drunk, who was in the retinue of Dionysus. Silenus was the tutor of Dionysus and had helped him form his character. The diameter of this piece is approximately 1.4 inches and the length is approximately 2 inches. This piece has a dark green patina with red highlights and the detail is superb. There are some dark green mineral deposits seen on the extended peg. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom black/plexiglas base and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,800.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very think on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Mathias Komor collection, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #595233
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive Greek bronze plaque dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches long by 3.25 inches high, and has extremely high relief that is approximately 1.3 inches. This piece is an Eros that is seen pulling a rope around the neck of a panther. The panther is seen facing the viewer and the body of Eros is twisted towards the viewer as well. The scene is framed by Greek palmettes and scrolls. This applique probably was part of a bronze hydria or a bronze vessel of some type, and is a scarce example. The panther was sacred to Dionysus and the Eros seen here may be a representation of Dionysus as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This intact piece is complete, and has no breaks or chips. This attractive piece is mounted on a custom metal stand. Ex: Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, New York. Published in Gods and Mortals 1989, no.13. ($3750.00 fixed price list.) Ex: New York private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1147979
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare to scarce piece is an Attic Greek beaker/mug that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-725 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, and is slightly larger than most recorded examples. This piece is also intact and has no repair/restoration, no overpaint, and no stress cracks that run within the vessel. The handle is completely intact, and this is rare for an early Attic Greek vessel of this type, as most examples have damage and/or repair to the handle or the area where the raised handle attaches to the body. This piece is also in its "as found" condition, with some very slight wear to one side, and there are spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel which also mask some of the dark brown line design. This piece has dark brown cross hatched designs, with dots below, that run around the center of the vessel, and singular line design that runs up the length of the handle. This vessel is a light tan terracotta, and has a flat bottom with a slightly flared lip. This piece was also likely produced in Athens for the export market. This piece is very analogous in shape and size to the Heidi Vollmoeller Collection piece that was offered by Christie's Antiquities, South Kensington, London, Oct. 2003, lot no. 519. (See attachment.) There have been very few of these Attic Greek Geometric Period pieces on the market, and they are rare to scarce, especially in this intact condition. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #694678
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This rare Greek bronze ram dates from the Geometric period, circa 750 B.C. This charming piece is intact and is approximately 1.75 inches high by 1.7 inches long. This piece has a nice dark green patina and has spotty light brown/white mineral deposits. This piece is a standing ram, which is a much rarer type than the more often seen standing horse types for the period. The ram for the ancient Greeks represented vitality and wealth, was a favourite sacrificial animal, and was often associated with Hermes, patron deity of shepherds, travellers, and tradesmen. This association with Hermes is a strong indicator that this piece was probably a votive offering in some Greek sanctuary. (For an analogous designed piece see "More Animals in Ancient Art From the Leo Mildenberg Collection", by Kozloff, Arielle and Mitten, David Gordon, Verlag Philipp Von Zabern pub., Mainz, Germany 1986, no.53. The example noted here also has an extended tail, tapered body, and square shoulders as the piece offered here. For another example, see "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XII, 2001, no. 52. Said to be from Thessaly, circa 8th century B.C., 2 inches long. Listed at $4,750.00. Ex: Spencer Churchill collection. ) The complete piece offered here was cast as one solid piece, as were the other two examples noted above, and was made to stand by itself which it does. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1268083
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This striking piece is a hard stone mace head that dates to the Predynastic Period, circa 3200 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high, and is pear shaped. This piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the center of the piece, and was connected to a wooden staff. This piece is made from a beautiful multi-colored hard stone, and looks to be a combination of light brown marble and light to dark green serpentine. There is some spotty hardened white calcite deposits seen on sections of the piece, and this piece has no cracks and/or chips and is in superb to mint "as found" condition. This piece is also typical of the mace heads that have been found in Egypt and the ancient Near East, and it is also possible that this piece is votive, as well as having been used during the lifetime of the warrior that owned this weapon. This piece also has some weight to it, and it surely was a formidable weapon for the period. This type of piece has also been classified for the type and period by J. Crowfoot Payne in "Catalog of the Predynastic Egyptian collection in the Ashmolean Museum", Oxford and New York, 1993, nos. 1251-1261. This piece has a high degree of eye appeal, although it is a simple shape. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas/wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#P33-040-102314. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
These two rare and superb carved wooden panels are French, and date to the late Gothic period, circa 1600-1700 A.D. These pieces are a matching pair, although they have slight differences. Both of these carved panels are approximately 7.8 inches wide by 17.75 inches high, and are mounted in frames that are approximately 11.75 inches wide by 28 inches high. These outer frames date circa 1800-1850, and were the mounting for the panels that were set into a hotel lobby in Paris, France. These panels were originally set into a private manor house that belonged to the Orlinski family in Normandy. The bulk of the Orlinski panels were sold at auction in San Francisco, CA., by Butterfield & Butterfield Co. in June 1996. Many of these panels, which were religious in nature, were identified as being produced by artisans who were employed in the area of Coutances, France, where the massive 13th century Gothic cathedral of Notre Dame was built. The panels seen here were finely carved and have great detail, and the condition of both panels is exceptional. These panels display two caryatids that are seen back to back, and are carved in high relief. The caryatids were known in antiquity as the priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, and were often seen as a draped female figure that supported an entablature. The figures seen on these two panels are part lion, with the lion's paw feet, part bird, with the detailed feathered wings, and part woman, with the female breasts and faces. The raised hair comb and luxuriant wavy hair is very detailed as well, and is an excellent mark that the artist that carved these pieces was very skilled. Ex: Orlinski collection, France. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #680621
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete piece is a Greek standing terracotta figure of a votaress. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high and dates circa 5th century BC. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration. There are some light brown earthen deposits that are adhered to the surface, and this is an indication that this piece has not been over cleaned, and as such, the surface of this piece is superb quality with little wear. This piece was mold made and was designed with a trapezoidal base. This votaress may represent the Greek goddess Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton and a himation that is seen draped over her shoulders. She has a slight smile and is seen holding a piglet against her breasts with both hands, and this piglet is probably a votive offering. (See Sotheby's Antiquities New York, June 2004, no. 33 and Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2000, no. 84, for other analogous examples. The two pieces cited here are approximately 10.5 inches and 8.25 inches high.) These terracotta figurines are thought to be votive in nature, and represented the offering that is seen within the piece itself, and consequently, this piece was intended as a substitute for the actual offering. This piece is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom wooden base. Ex: German private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1266269
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Roman marble fragment that dates from the Roman Imperial Period, circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.2 inches high by 8.25 inches long. This piece is likely a fragment from a marble table top which had a framing border, and this fragment is a section of this framing border. The top of this piece has a flat, but concave edge, and this formed the outer edge of the marble table top. The back side is flat, and the top side of this fragment (table top edge section) has a width of approximately 1.6 inches. This piece has a nice spotty light brown patina, and is in superb condition with very little wear. The scene depicted on this piece is interesting, in that it is a gladiatorial scene of a semi-nude pygmy with a spear fighting a leaping panther. This type of pygmy gladiator was known as a "Venator", who fought and/or hunted animals in the arena, and this type of spectacle was known as a "Venatio" or "hunt". The spear used by the "Venatores" for fighting with animals was also known as a "Venabulum". (See "Gladiator, Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Random House, 2009.) The pygmy appears to be wearing a wide strap around his neck and chest that may have been used to help support the weight of the large spear. This long spear would have been an advantage for the pygmy, as it would have provided separation between himself and the panther, but it was also a disadvantage, especially if the quick panther got past the blade tip of the unwieldy spear. The two figures seen on this scarce gladiatorial scene, may also be depicted close to scale with one another, and the panther appears that it could have stood as high as the height of the pygmy. The scene depicted, of a pygmy vs. panther, is a relatively scarce to rare scene of the gladiatorial games, as most of the gladiatorial scenes depicted on Roman art portray full sized and armed gladiators. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and this type of scene is seldom seen on the market. This piece is mounted on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1018188
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This rare piece is made from a red/brown terracotta and has spotty light brown earthern deposits. This piece is a terracotta model of a theatrical mask and dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This superb example is approximately 5.3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and this is the normal size for a votive mask of this type. This piece is intact, and is 100% original. There are some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and some minute stress cracks and pitting which is normally seen on a piece of this type as it is mold made. This superb piece has a very dramatic face which depicts a youth with a slightly open mouth with wide open eyes. This mask was likely votive, and this piece may also have been buried with an individual who was active in the theatrical arts. (For additional examples see "The Greek World, Art and Civilization in Magna Graecia and Sicily", edited by Giovanni Pugliese Carratelli, Rizzoli Pub., New York, 1996, pp.713-717.) The top forehead is not extended back, as real hair and/or a wreath was added to this piece for added effect. This type of design would also serve an individual well in life, as well as the afterlife, and this mask may have been intended to depict a character such as Hecuba and/or Taltibio, from the Greek tragedy "Le Troiane" by Euripides. This mask, as a votive burial object, may have been intended to represent Hecuba's expression of profound pain and/or Taltibio's contrasting sentiment, which in both cases allude to the moment when the small Trojan baby Astyanax was barbarously killed. The horror of this moment was magnified, as the small Astyanax was thrown down from the walls of Troy by Menelaus, while his mother Andromache is taken away as a slave as the flames rise over Troy. These votive masks were intended to represent characters in ancient Greek tragedies, as noted above, as well as comedies. In any case, very few examples come to the market and are rare. This piece is mounted on a museum quality custom stand and has great eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: