Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #782558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This nice Greek ceramic is cup that is intact and it is an attractive form. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek art from southern Italy and Greek art from Attica (mainland Greece). This piece was produced circa 375-350 B.C. and is a glossy blackware with matt pinkish red designs. Xenon ware usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. This piece has a key pattern that runs around the center of the vessel, with chevron lines above. The condition of this intact piece in mint, and has no minute breaks and/or chips. The key design is missing in sections, and this is common, as the paint was often added after the ceramic was fired and/or was a thin application. This piece has not been over painted as well. There are some spotty white calcite deposits, and some root marking. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and is a superb example for the type. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1147979
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare to scarce piece is an Attic Greek beaker/mug that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-725 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, and is slightly larger than most recorded examples. This piece is also intact and has no repair/restoration, no overpaint, and no stress cracks that run within the vessel. The handle is completely intact, and this is rare for an early Attic Greek vessel of this type, as most examples have damage and/or repair to the handle or the area where the raised handle attaches to the body. This piece is also in its "as found" condition, with some very slight wear to one side, and there are spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel which also mask some of the dark brown line design. This piece has dark brown cross hatched designs, with dots below, that run around the center of the vessel, and singular line design that runs up the length of the handle. This vessel is a light tan terracotta, and has a flat bottom with a slightly flared lip. This piece was also likely produced in Athens for the export market. This piece is very analogous in shape and size to the Heidi Vollmoeller Collection piece that was offered by Christie's Antiquities, South Kensington, London, Oct. 2003, lot no. 519. (See attachment.) There have been very few of these Attic Greek Geometric Period pieces on the market, and they are rare to scarce, especially in this intact condition. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1102815
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Byzantine bronze cross that has a nice silver inlaid design. This piece dates circa 4th-7th century A.D., and is approximately 1.9 inches high by 1.9 inches high by 1/16th inch thick. This piece has an attractive silver inlaid design which has a detailed "circle-and-line" type design. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some light green and red surface deposits. There are also five small holes seen in this piece which were likely used to sew this piece into a garment. This piece is in superb condition, and could easily be worn as a pendant today. This piece also comes with a custom black plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Attic Sessile Kantharos, that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is also classified as being of the "Saint-Valentin Class". This attractive piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is repaired from several large tight fitting fragments, and is 100% original. What makes this piece better than most examples of this type, is the bright glossy glazed surface which is seen with a deep black, a bright white, and a vibrant light orange color. This piece has on each side a dotted checker-pattern, a band of laurel in added white, and vertical lines seen above and below. The dotted checker-pattern is very detailed, and is designed in a rectangular box like a tesserae floor mosaic. This piece also has a black dot pattern on the bottom, and a deep black glaze is seen within the vessel. There are also some white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom surface as well. Another analogous vessel of this type and condition is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Morven Collection of Ancient Art", New York, June 2004, no. 362. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here has an exceptional glossy surface with a detailed painted design, is a better example than most pieces of this type, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #590960
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This nice Roman glass flask dates circa 2nd century AD and is in mint condition, with no breaks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 7.4 inches high and is a light green color. There are heavier surface deposits seen on one side, and this suggests a burial pattern. There are spotty mineral deposits and areas of muti-colored iridescence seen in sections of the vessel. This vessel is larger than most examples, as it has a tall elongated neck, and is a nice example. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this vessel is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #613441
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb piece is a kantharos that is intact and it is a scarce type. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek from southern Italy and mainland Greek, meaning a Greek artist from Attica. This vessel may also have been an importation from Attica into Magna Graecia (southern Italy). This type of kantharos also follows the earlier Greek Attic kantharos types known as a "Saint-Valentin" kantharos, which were produced circa 450 B.C. Both of the types noted above have a ring base and ellipsoid handles. This piece was produced circa 375-350 B.C. and is a glossy blackware with matt pinkish red designs. Xenon ware usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. All of these elements are seen on both sides of this piece, and the condition of this vessel is mint, as it is intact and the painted details are very vibrant. There are some spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking in sections of the vessel. This vessel is scarce in this condition and size, as it is approximately 4.25 inches high by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1130040
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Roman silver ring with a red carnelian that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is a size 7-7.5, and is approximately 17 mm wide across the top face, and 27 mm high from the top of the stone to the bottom of the ring. The silver ring bezel is solid silver, and the thick red carnelian is translucent which seems to glow in daylight, and this beautiful glowing effect is very noticable when the light hits this piece. Another noticable feature of this ring is that the flat face of the stone is carved with a standing eagle with outstreched wings, and above is a standing winged Victory goddess who is seen holding a victory fillet at the front. The standing winged Victory is also seen with her feet lifting off the ground, and is seen floating above the standing eagle, who in turn, is seen standing on a ground line. The combination of this design is very powerful, as it presents a "real world" symbol, with the standing eagle on the ground line which represents Rome and the power of Rome, and the floating Victory, which represents a "spiritual world" symbol, with the power of the Victory goddess. The meaning of this combined symbolism is "Victory for Rome", and the Roman eagle was a common symbol associated with the Roman legions, and was the most prominent standard of the Roman army. Roman legionnaires often had a private shrine with a Roman bronze or silver eagle which they worshipped for good luck, and many of these small bronze and silver eagles can be seen on the market today. The Roman soldier who choose this ring as his signet, not only shows his loyalty to Rome, but it also evokes the strength of the Empire and its military, and as such, this ring likely belonged to someone that was in the Roman military and/or was likely connected with it to a high degree. The artistic composition is very skillfully done, and the carving of this gem is better than most examples. The red carnelian gem is also a large example, and is approximately 20 mm high by 14 mm wide. The condition of the gem is superb, save for a small internal fracture that can be seen below the eagle. The silver ring bezel was solid cast, and has some minute root marking and checkering that is seen mostly under high magnification, and this is normal for a silver ring of this age. The patina is also a light grey, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Overall, this ring is an exceptional large example, can easily be worn today, and is rare example in the market. Another Roman silver ring dated circa 1st-2nd century A.D., with the same type of bezel design and a carved standing Ceres goddess, can be seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, Dec. 1999, no. 118, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates. (See attached photo.) This piece also comes with a ring box for display. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: This piece also comes with additional documentation that is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1266120
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This dainty little Greek Attic "Black-figure" ceramic is a Little Master Lip Cup that dates circa 550-530 B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 3.9 inches high, by 5.75 inches in diameter, by 7.8 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in superb condition, is 100% original, and has limited repair with three pie shaped sections that were reattached to the otherwise intact body. This piece has some spotty minute white calcite deposits, and has a deep vibrant black glaze over a light red/tan terracotta. This piece has a little tondo with a black circle on the inside, and on each side there is a black glazed standing figure who likely represents Oedipus facing the Thebanian Sphinx. The black glazed standing figures and the facing Sphinx both have detailed features with graceful lines, in addition to incised line design within the figures. The face of the Sphinx on Side A also appears to be growling, and according to Greek myth, Oedipus was charged with ridding the Sphinx from his kingdom, as the Sphinx was devouring many of his subjects. To rid the Sphinx from his kingdom, Oedipus had to answer the Sphinx which refers to the Greek myth of the "Riddle of the Sphinx", and the answer to this riddle is "man". This piece also has been attributed to the Tleson Painter, who favored individually pictured animals that were connected to Greek myth such as the Sphinx seen here. The Sphinx is a rare depiction, and wild boars, goats, swans, lions, and stags are usually seen. According to Robert Folsom in "Attic Black-Figured Pottery", Noyes Classical Studies, 1975, p. 126: "The Tleson Painter, named after the potter Tleson, son of Nearchos, was one of the best and most prolific of the Little Masters. Often his cups have little decoration other than an inscription between the handles. Others have a brief picture of little figures, drawn with grace, precision, and nicety of style on the lip." Little Master cups, like the piece offered here, generally have a deep bowl, horizontal upturned handles, and a tall stemmed foot; they receive their name from their miniature black-figure decoration. Little Master cups are amoung the finest expressions of the Attic potter's sense of balance and design, and these pieces were principally made for one to admire the graceful form of the vessel, in addition to the figural scene. The dainty esoteric shape of this vessel appears to have evolved from earlier cup shapes like the so-called Komast Cup and Siana Cup. The Little Master Lip Cup with its distinctive decorative format of small isolated figures on the upper lip of the vessel, was well established by circa 550 B.C. in Attica. After 530 B.C. this vessel type was gradually replaced by the larger Eye Cup type circa 530 B.C. Some vessels of the Little Masters Cup type are also signed by the artist with a simple inscription seen between the handles on the upper lip, and painted palmettes usually spring from the handles to flank such painted inscriptions that were painted with minute lettering. The vase offered here has neither of the features noted above, as there is only a figural scene seen on each side, and this singular figural scene is an artistic hallmark of the Tleson Painter, along with the so-called Centaur Painter. An analogous Little Masters Band Cup with a figural scene of Herakles wrestling the Nemean lion is seen in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 1, 2014, no. 78 (10,000.00-15,000.00 Pound estimates, 12,500.00 Pound realized. See attached photo.). This piece also has a (TL) authenticity test from Laboratory Ralf Kotalla, #03100413. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in modern day Iran. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece probably was a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: J.J. Klejman Gallery, New York. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1267183
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates to the Classical Period, circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches in diameter, by 1.6 inches high. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and has an exceptional gold "river patina" with some spotty dark red and brown mineral deposits. The rare gold "river patina" sometimes occurs on ancient Greek bronzes of this type, due to the metal of this piece having a high tin content, and the highly mineralized soil conditions from which this piece was buried. This piece was also hand beaten from a single sheet of bronze, and there is some weight to this piece as this piece is thick walled. In the inside center of this piece, there is a raised circular roundel known as an "omphalos", which in the ancient Greek mind represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks regarded the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. Delphi enshrined the sacred half-egg stone, which was also known as the "omphalos", and "omphalos" in Greek means "navel". The "omphalos" seen on the piece offered here is raised very high within the vessel, and also served as a finger grip on the bottom outer side, as this piece was made without any handles. This type of vessel is also known as a "libation vessel", and it is ceremonial in nature, as it was used at temple and/or funeral ceremonies. This type of vessel with it's flat bottom, and central "omphalos", was used for pouring and/or offering libations. The design elements of this type of vessel, along with the sacred symbols built into the piece, made this type of vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and was often made as a temple or grave offering. (For this type of vessel, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Co. Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp. 74-83.) The bronze piece offered here is much better than most examples, and has an exceptional patina that is seldom seen on the market. A custom Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000040. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #862556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a bronze ring that is from the Luristan culture that dwelled in Western Iran, circa 1000-800 B.C., Iron Age II. This object was cast as one solid piece, is approximately 4.9 inches in diameter, and is very heavy, as it is approximately .5 inches thick. This beautiful piece is in superb condition and has an exceptional dark green patina with light brown and reddish highlights. This massive adornment was worn above the bicep on the upper arm, and was considered to be a very valuable object by this culture. This piece was likely clamped on the upper arm of a warrior individual who wore this piece for life, and this piece has a high degree of smooth wear on the inner surfaces, which is a good indication that the owner wore this piece for a considerable length of time. The Luristan culture was a tribal society of mixed small-scale agriculturalists and pastoralists, raising sheep and goats, many horses, and perhaps using chariots where the terrain permitted. The wealth of this culture was concentrated in the hands of a warrior aristocracy who patronized the metal smiths, and they considered bronze very valuable, as it could be fashioned over and over again into weapons. This culture was highly skilled in the arts of war, and perhaps only the Spartans could have been as skilled in the use of their weapons. This piece has attractive decorative chevrons and checker-band patterns that were engraved into the metal. These designs are also seen on the ceramics for the period. (For other bronze armlets of this type see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals" by P.R.S. Moorey, Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, nos. 611-613.) A custom stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #593672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This extremely fine Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece circa 460-430 BC. This coin weighs 3 grams and has a light gray patina. The obverse has a facing bull, and the reverse, features the head of Artemis with the hair bound with a fillet. The bull probably represents a sacrificial bull. The letters of Phokis are seen around the head. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1209679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting little piece is a Roman bronze scale weight that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches high by 1.4 inches wide. This piece appears to be a young cherub, with a rounded chubby face, pudgy nose, and slight smile. The eyes are also beaded silver inlay, and the beaded silver eyes lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. There is also an attached hoop at the top which attached this piece to a scale. This piece was likely filled with lead, and this piece served as a scale weight. This piece has a dark green patina, and is an exceptional example. This piece also hangs from a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: