Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide mouth seen on this vessel also allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1262216
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This extremely rare piece is a complete Greek bronze mitra piece that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.1 inches high by 7.25 inches wide, is intact with no repair/restoration, and is complete save for a small missing tip of one side. This piece was designed to be suspended from a belt, and likely hung below the rim of a bronze bell corselet. The shape of this piece also suggests that it protected the stomach and lower abdomen, and perhaps each side of the hips as well, with more than one piece attached to a leather belt. There are two holes seen at each end of the central stem which likely held rings that attached to the leather belt. This method of attachment allowed this piece to freely move at the bottom, and allowed the warrior ease of movement as this piece was able to move with the body. According to Herbert Hoffmann in "Early Cretan Armorers", Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 9-10: "The Cretan mitra was designed to be suspended from a belt and to hang below the rim of the bell corselet. The total absence from the find of anything that might be identified as part of a metal belt suggests that the mitrai were worn from a belt of perishable material. Most examples are semicircular sheets of bronze 5 to 7.5mm thick, varying in height from 12.5 to 18 cms. and in breadth from 21.5 to 29.5 cms. The edges of their wide flat rims are sometimes rolled over a bronze wire, the straight upper edge being rolled outward and the edge of the crescent inward. Three holes are punched in the sheet metal near the top edge, one at the center and one at each end, to accommodate rings from which the mitra was suspended. The function of these bronze plates as stomach protectors was recognized by Furtwangler when he published the first examples discovered at Olympia. F. Poulsen gave them the Homeric name 'mitra' in his publication of the specimen from Rethymnon, and the term has had archaeological respectability ever since (although what sort of body armor Homer meant is highly debatable). In endeavoring to define the role played by mitrai in Greek combat we must take into account their geographical distribution. This form of armor is to date documented only from Crete, Thrace, and Etruria - three regions of the ancient world noted for their archers. It seems likely that mitrai were meant to protect their wearers against arrows, i.e. that they were worn by hoplites frequently exposed to archery attack." (An example published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, pl. 40, no. 3, is slightly larger than the example offered here, has three suspension rings, and has a half crescent shape. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has a slightly different design than the known examples published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, and the design of this piece may point to Cyprus, and if this is the case, the piece offered here may be one of the earliest examples of it's type, and pre-dates the published Hoffmann examples that date circa mid to late 7th century B.C. The inside of the exceptional piece offered here also likely had a leather liner, and/or had a thick leather pad which attached to the additional perimeter holes seen on this piece. This piece also has fine workmanship, as there are raised punched round knobs that are seen running around the perimeter of the piece. These knobs, besides being very decorative, also add strength to the overall piece. This piece has a beautiful light green patina with some heavy dark green and blue mineralization, along with some white calcite deposits, and the patina and mineral deposits are also heavier on the backside of this piece. Greek armor from this early period is extremely rare, and even fragments from this period are seldom seen on the market. This piece is attached to a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some heavy white calcite deposits that are seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and were placed in tombs, and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Antiquities Auction 2005. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #1150907
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman marble that is in the form of a human hand that is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long by 2.2 inches high. This piece is nearly a complete example of a human hand, as it is broken in the upper wrist, and is a fragment from a larger statue. This piece has a light tan patina, has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and is a superb qaulity marble. The hand is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag, which is also an attribute of the Greek god Hermes/Roman god Mercury, as Hermes and Mercury were both a god of merchants that presided over trade. The hand also appears to be that of a young man, as the fingers are slender and the upper part of the hand appears to be somewhat feminine in nature. The subsequent Roman creations of Hermes were often modeled after the early Greek 4th century B.C. creation of Hermes by Praxiteles, which was found at Olympia in 1877. (For a description of this piece, see "A Handbook of Greek Art", by Gisela Richter, Phaidon Press Limited, Oxford, 1987, p. 144.) This prototype statue of Hermes by Praxiteles is a young man, with slight feminine features, and is portrayed with a convention of classical Greek art that portrayed the gods and goddesses as being eternally young. The marble piece offered here also has these features which not only point this fragment as likely being attributed to Hermes, but also illustrates an earlier Greek convention of art. (Another example approximately 2.75 inches long was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 312. 700-1,000 Pound estimates, 1,500 Pound/$2,427.00 realized.) The piece offered here is a nice scarce piece with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1277641
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
This sensual and appealing piece is a Greek Attic column krater that dates circa 460 B.C. This Attic "red-figure" piece is approximately 10.8 inches high, by 9.9 inches wide at the top from handle to handle. This piece has also been attributed to the "Florence Painter", who was one of the better Greek Attic painters who used gestures and facial expression to portray emotion. This piece shows three standing young men on "Side A", and two facing and standing young men on "Side B". The three young men on "Side A" are all seen interacting with one another, and the figure on the left appears to reach out and help balance the amphora that the central figure is carrying to the right. The figure on the right appears to walk towards the central figure, and is watching his progress. The entire scene conveys movement, and is an every day scene that perhaps would be lived out in "Classical Period" Athens. The central figure seen carrying the amphora, perhaps used for water or wine, is seen with his upper torso designed with a three-quarter design that is opened to the viewer. His cloak is also seen open at the center, which conveys an erotic and sensual view of his nude body which the figure on the right is closely admiring as well. All of the other figures seen on this piece are fully cloaked, and the semi-nude central figure on "Side A" truly stands out in the composition. In addition, his hair is seen "free flowing" down from his red wreathed brow, and this hair design adds to the sensual nature of this piece. "Side B" also shows a scene where one young man is offering another a drink, and perhaps both scenes on this vessel portray and refer to a public celebration. The young man receiving the drink also appears to be surprised for the drink offering. The eye design seen on the five figures of this lovely piece are also very analogous to the contemporary "Niobid Painter", as are the faces that have rounded chins and eternally young faces. (See "Attic Red-Figure Pottery" by Robert Folsom, Noyes Classical Studies, 1976, p. 175, Fig. A30, for a drawing of an eye design attributed to the Niobid Painter.) This piece also has a delicately painted "ivy leaf and floral pattern" design painted within a box that is seen on the raised neck of "Side A". There is also an added detailed "black acorn pattern" seen running around the top lip, with an attractive black "acanthus pattern" seen above each handle as well. This piece is in mint to superb condition, with no repair/restoration, and has vibrant orange/red, black, and red colors. There are heavy white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inside of the vessel, and on the outer upper third of the vessel, and overall, this intact piece is in it's natural "as found" condition. An exceptional erotic type vessel that not only has a great deal of eye appeal, but was also created by a scarce painter that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1199056
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic oinochoe that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This charming little piece is approximately 5.5 inches high. This piece is an Attic blackware ceramic that has an incised designed theater mask in the form of a light red bearded man with a white diadem. This extremely rare example was also produced in the "Six's Technique", as seen with the red beard of the theatre mask with incised hair detail, and the face and diadem with white painted details. According to Joseph Noble in "The Techniques of Painted Attic Pottery", Watson-Guptill Pub., New York, 1965, p. 66: "SIX'S TECHNIQUE: Six's technique of East Greek origin, was usually employed on small vases such as lekythoi, phialai, skyphoi, and Nicosthenic amphorae. It made use of the added white, pink, and red. In this technique the picture was painted with a brush, applying the color to the surface of the vase which had been coated with the black glaze matter, and sometimes details or other figures were added by incision. The vase was then subjected to the usual Attic three-stage firing. This was an interesting technique; the pottery is attractive and has a spontaneous quality, but it is somewhat crude, lacking the refinement of the conventional black-figure or red-figure work." This Attic piece is extremely rare to rare with this type of "Six's technique" design, and in addition, incised theater masks of this type seen on Attic ceramics is not often seen on the market. This piece is also classified as "Type 5B", according to the "John D. Beazley Shape Chart", and is an extremely rare type which is only seen circa early 5th century B.C. This complete piece is repaired from several fragments, and has only over paint where the pieces have come together, and overall, is an extremely fine example with a nice deep black glaze. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This piece is in flawless condition, and has no repair/restoration, cracks, or chips. Vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This attractive piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and it has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (See "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58, for an analogous example.) The piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this quality. Ex: private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1267183
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates to the Classical Period, circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches in diameter, by 1.6 inches high. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and has an exceptional gold "river patina" with some spotty dark red and brown mineral deposits. The rare gold "river patina" sometimes occurs on ancient Greek bronzes of this type, due to the metal of this piece having a high tin content, and the highly mineralized soil conditions from which this piece was buried. This piece was also hand beaten from a single sheet of bronze, and there is some weight to this piece as this piece is thick walled. In the inside center of this piece, there is a raised circular roundel known as an "omphalos", which in the ancient Greek mind represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks regarded the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. Delphi enshrined the sacred half-egg stone, which was also known as the "omphalos", and "omphalos" in Greek means "navel". The "omphalos" seen on the piece offered here is raised very high within the vessel, and also served as a finger grip on the bottom outer side, as this piece was made without any handles. This type of vessel is also known as a "libation vessel", and it is ceremonial in nature, as it was used at temple and/or funeral ceremonies. This type of vessel with it's flat bottom, and central "omphalos", was used for pouring and/or offering libations. The design elements of this type of vessel, along with the sacred symbols built into the piece, made this type of vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and was often made as a temple or grave offering. (For this type of vessel, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Co. Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp. 74-83.) The bronze piece offered here is much better than most examples, and has an exceptional patina that is seldom seen on the market. A custom Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000040. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315774
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek Attic skyphos cup that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a rich even black lustrous surface that is seen both on the outer and inner surfaces. In addition, the black glaze is complete on the inner surface which also points to the fine workmanship of this vessel. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits, and some minute root marking seen in sections of this piece. The lustrous black glazed surface also has a multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a flat base, and two attached strap handles. This piece is an exceptional example, is in mint to superb condition, and is better than most examples of the type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1319158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
These two scarce bronze pieces are from the Urnfield culture, and date late Bronze Age, circa 13th-10th century B.C. These two matching detailed pieces are each approximately 4 to 3.6 inches in diameter, as they are elliptical in shape. They each have an opening that is approximately 1.22 inches wide, and these were made to fit on the upper or lower arm. Each piece also has an incised "line-and-herringbone" design that is seen running around the entire outer edge of each piece, and runs from each terminal end to terminal end. This incised design is very detailed, and can easily be seen some distance from each piece. These pieces are in mint "as found" condition, and have no repair/restoration. They also have an even and beautiful dark blue to dark green patina that is exceptional. It is also more likely that these pieces were votive, and were not intended to be worn every day, but it may also be possible that these pieces were worn for special ceremonial events. This type of piece has also been found in votive hoard offerings, and the pieces offered here could also have been created entirely for this purpose, as bronze was extremely valuable at the time that these pieces were created. The Urnfield Culture, circa 1300 B.C.-750 B.C., was a late Bronze Age culture of central Europe, and it's name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields. The Urnfield culture followed the Tumulus culture and was succeeded by the Hallstatt culture. Linguistic evidence and continuity with the subsequent Hallstatt culture suggests that the people of this area spoke an early form of celtic, perhaps originally proto-Celtic. It's also notable that the early Urnfield period, circa 1300 B.C., was a time when the warriors of central Europe were often heavily armored with body armor, helmets, and shields all made of bronze. The Urnfield culture has votive weapons, bronze pins, and bracelets such as the pieces offered here, that often have been found in warrior's graves. This prolific amount of bronze weapons and objects, attributed to this culture, likely borrowed the idea and burial customs from Mycenaean Greece. These pieces also hang from an included custom display stand. These solid pieces have a great deal of eye appeal and can easily be worn today. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This unique piece is a stamped plaque that is made from lead. This piece is Italic, and dates circa mid 16th to the late 17th century A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 2.7 inches wide, by 2.1 inches high, and by .15 inches thick. The shape of this piece is oval, and as such, was likely an inlay for a furniture piece or a box, rather than part of a large pendant for a necklace and/or pectoral. The backside of this piece is flat, and this piece was made in the same fashion as a Roman bronze sestertius or Renaissance medallion coin would have been made, with a carved die that was hand struck into the prepared heated lead flan. This method of manufacture allowed one to make several examples of this piece, however, the piece offered here may be the only recorded example, as our research has not found any other pieces. In fact, all of these lead plaques are very rare, as lead is very soft and is easy to damage, melts very easily, and can simply be easily used later on to make other objects. The piece offered here has a light brown patina with a thin oxidized crust over the outer surface, moreover, the condition of this piece is superb with no major tears, dents, or scraps as lead is a very soft material. There are also micro black dendrites which indicate that this piece has been buried for quite some time. There is a small hole seen at the top which may have held an attachment pin. This piece shows a seated, virile figure that is seen half draped, and is seen holding a round object in his extended right hand which may be an apple. This seated figure appears to be examining and looking at the round object that he is seen holding up in front of himself, and there is a strong possibility that the figure is the Trojan prince Paris, who is contemplating as to whom he should award the prize. According to Greek myth, it was Paris who was chosen by the gods to decide which of the three goddesses - Juno, Minerva, or Venus - was the fairest, and the prize was an apple. Venus won the prize who in turn awarded Paris the mortal Helen, and this triggered the Trojan War. The Trojan prince Aeneas, subsequently fled the ruins of Troy to found the city of Rome, as praised by the Roman poet Virgil, who prophesied a "new golden age" as founded by Augustus, the first or Roman emperors. Virgil, Horace, and Propertius, who are considered the greatest writers in Roman literature, all embraced Augustus' propaganda campaign in creating the "myth of Augustus", which fostered the idea that Augustus was the one chosen by the gods to preside over the new empire. This literary propaganda campaign legitimized Augustus' hold on power after the bloody civil wars, and in the same context, there are several Roman works of art that served the same purpose. The piece offered here points back to the founding of Rome, and another rare Roman work of art that is considered by many academics to fit into this category is the Portland Vase, and the seated figure seen on the Portland Vase known as "Figure E" is thought to be Paris as well. The artistic style of "Figure E" is also very analogous to the seated figure seen on the piece offered here, as both are seated, both are nude except for drapery that falls over the thighs, both have a virile muscular build, and both have the same type of hair style. (See "Glass of the Caesars" by Donald Harden, The British Museum Pub., London, 1987, p. 59.) The piece offered here was also examined by Dr. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, who dated this piece, and in addition, he thought there was a strong possibility that the maker of this piece saw the Portland Vase. The seated figure seen on the piece offered here is seen centered in front of a fountain with a lion's head spout. There are also architectural elements seen at the back of the seated figure, including a building with a round dome that may be a representation of the Pantheon. The overall scene may be one set in the Campus Martius (Field of Mars), and is the location where Augustus was cremated and where his Mausoleum was built. The piece offered here is an important work of Italic Renaissance art, according to Dr. Fischer-Bossert, but this piece is obviously in need of further academic study. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private English collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1290668
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This attractive coin is a Greek EL (electron) hekte that was minted in Kyzikos, circa 550-500 B.C. This scarce piece shows the winged helmeted head of Perseus on the obverse, with a tunny fish behind; and the reverse is a quadripartite incuse square punch. This piece is superb quality (EF+/EF+), is approximately 12mm, 2.69gms, is well centered for the type, and has a lustrous high relief sharp portrait of the mythical figure Perseus. The portrait is also seen in the "Greek Archaic" artistic style, and is seen with a large almond eye, a large nose and chin, and a slight smile. "Greek Archaic" portraiture is also a very desirable feature highly valued by collectors of ancient Greek coins, and the portrait seen here is a fine example. There is also an unobtrusive test mark behind the bust, and is very difficult to see, and does not detract from the detailed and high relief portrait of Perseus. Kyzikos was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. The city's prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made it a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas, and the coin seen here likely was made to facilitate port and shipping fees. Kyzikos principle export was the tunny fish, which is often seen on the obverse of it's coinage. The prevalence of winged beings seen on Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of an archaic mythical convention of art, that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as a symbol of their nature, and in the case of the gods, of their power to move across great distances. On the coin offered here, we see Perseus, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danae, who was the daughter of the king of Argos; and as Perseus had divine status, he was widely worshiped and admired among the ancient Greeks. On the exceptional coin offered here, he is depicted as a divine entity wearing a winged helmet, which is the so-called "Helm of Hades", which rendered its owner invisible to other supernatural entities and mortals. This winged helmet was given to him by Athena, in order to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa. The coin offered here is scarce to rare on the market, and is a rare depiction of Perseus. Von Fritze no. 65. SNG von Aulock no. 1186. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This scarce Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce, and not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in modern day Iran. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece probably was a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: J.J. Klejman Gallery, New York. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: