Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1108747
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare piece is a Roman marbled glass flask that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition. This piece is a dark green/blue color, has some heavy white calcite deposits on the upper inner surfaces, and some spotty black mineral deposits on the outer surface. This exceptional piece was produced by blending glass rods into the piece, and this process created the "marbled" composition of the vessel which is a heavy, thick-walled vessel. This process also produced a rough surface, and there are also small and large air bubbles that were fused into the glass. This piece was also difficult to produce, and is much rarer than the subsequent Roman blown glass vessels that were thin-walled and mass produced. This piece also has a flattened bottom and easily stands by itself. For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 90. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $6,875.00 realized.) Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This scarce huge piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact and is in mint condition, save a small stress crack that is seen in the middle of the spout. The surface of this exceptional piece has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina with a rich glossy black glaze, and some spotty white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel with the facing Silenus head was mold made, and the Silenus head has very high relief and is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type do not usually have this design feature. This piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. A nice intact scarce large vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: J.J. Klejman, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #1150907
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman marble that is in the form of a human hand that is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long by 2.2 inches high. This piece is nearly a complete example of a human hand, as it is broken in the upper wrist, and is a fragment from a larger statue. This piece has a light tan patina, has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and is a superb qaulity marble. The hand is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag, which is also an attribute of the Greek god Hermes/Roman god Mercury, as Hermes and Mercury were both a god of merchants that presided over trade. The hand also appears to be that of a young man, as the fingers are slender and the upper part of the hand appears to be somewhat feminine in nature. The subsequent Roman creations of Hermes were often modeled after the early Greek 4th century B.C. creation of Hermes by Praxiteles, which was found at Olympia in 1877. (For a description of this piece, see "A Handbook of Greek Art", by Gisela Richter, Phaidon Press Limited, Oxford, 1987, p. 144.) This prototype statue of Hermes by Praxiteles is a young man, with slight feminine features, and is portrayed with a convention of classical Greek art that portrayed the gods and goddesses as being eternally young. The marble piece offered here also has these features which not only point this fragment as likely being attributed to Hermes, but also illustrates an earlier Greek convention of art. (Another example approximately 2.75 inches long was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 312. 700-1,000 Pound estimates, 1,500 Pound/$2,427.00 realized.) The piece offered here is a nice scarce piece with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1142779
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This esoteric piece is a Greek Thracian bronze ring that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7-7.5, and has an even dark green patina. This cast piece is in superb condition, and can easily be worn today, as the hoop and bezel is very solid. There is some smooth wear on the inside surface which also indicates that this ring was worn for some time. This ring type dates to the Hellenistic period, and the artistic style is very simplistic, as seen with the "line-designed" stylized animal seen on the front face of the ring. This stylized animal was engraved into the front face, and is seen within an engraved circle that is seen near the edge of the front face. There are also engraved lines seen on each outer edge of the ring as well. The stylized animal has four elongated legs, a raised tail, and two ears or possibly horns. This piece was likely worn by a young adult, and the image seems to convey a great deal of animation and movement. This ring is of exceptional quality, and is a scarce example. A custom ring display stand is included, along with a ring box. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: David Liebert collection, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584209
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This flawless Roman glass plate is a light blue color and is approximately 9.4 inches in diameter by 2.25 inches high. This large piece dates circa 1st century AD and has a nice multi-colored patina. This piece has an applied ring base foot and a verticle wall with folded cordon at the base. This vessel has an exceptional high degree of workmanship, as the folds seen within this vessel form and strengthen the overall piece. This piece is very analogous in type, color, and size to the superb example recently sold at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 143. ( $3,800.00 bid, $4,750.00 with buyer's premium. ) Ex: Christie's Antiquities, June 2001, no. 210. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1102815
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Byzantine bronze cross that has a nice silver inlaid design. This piece dates circa 4th-7th century A.D., and is approximately 1.9 inches high by 1.9 inches high by 1/16th inch thick. This piece has an attractive silver inlaid design which has a detailed "circle-and-line" type design. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some light green and red surface deposits. There are also five small holes seen in this piece which were likely used to sew this piece into a garment. This piece is in superb condition, and could easily be worn as a pendant today. This piece also comes with a custom black plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, and some dark green/brown mineral deposits. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150248
Apolonia Ancient Art
$198.00
This extremely fine coin is a late Roman bronze 1/2 Centenionalis, 20 mm, that was minted by the Roman emperor Constans circa 348-350 A.D. Flavius Julius Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I (the Great) and Fausta, born 320 A.D. He later shared the empire with his two brothers, Constantine II and Constanyius II., and later was raised to the title of "Augustus" circa 337-350 A.D. In 348-350 Constans carried out a reform of the bronze coinage, and the coin offered here falls within this period. The obverse shows the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Constans facing right, with the legend: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG around. The line design of the hair is seen in very sharp detail. The reverse ahows a standing Phoenix facing right with a rediate crown, standing on a pyre, with the legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO around, ASIS below. The Phoenix seen standing on the reverse is also one of the few examples of a Phoenix bird that is seen on Roman coinage, and this is a rare symbol relative to Roman numismatics. This coin has a glossy dark green patina, and is EF/EF- grade. (Another example was recently sold by CNG, Auction 279, May 2012, no. 635, for $204.00.) This coin has a rare Roman symbol, and is a scarce Roman coin type. Sear 4009, R.I.C. 332. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora which dates to the 2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1150627
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb Roman bronze is an applique that shows a facing Diana with a bow quiver on her back. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches high. This piece is complete, and shows a facing bust of Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt. She is seen with a bow quiver strapped across her back, with the quiver straps running between her breasts, and is draped with a chiton and an animal skin cloak that is seen hanging from her left shoulder across her left breast. Her hair is tied into an intricate headdress with a large ribbon, and she is seen looking slightly to her left. Her eyes may have been inlayed with silver, precious stones, or more likely, colored pastes. This attractive bust of Diana displays a very serene face, and has very pleasing eye appeal. There is a punched pattern that runs around the flat base frame, and this bottom base frame is in the shape of a crescent moon. This crescent moon frames the bottom section of this bust, and also alludes to this goddess. This piece also has an attachment pin that is seen on the upper back side of the piece. Diana was the Roman equivalent of Artemis, the Greek goddess of the hunt, and for the Romans, Diana was also the goddess of light, mountains, and woods. One of her principle temples in the ancient Roman world was on the shores of Lake Nemi, south of Rome. The piece offered here has a nice light green and brown patina with some red highlights, along with some spotty light brown and white mineral deposits. This piece likely was a decorative element that may have fit on a Roman furniture piece or box. (For the type see Babelon-Blanchet, "Catalogue des Bronzes Antiques de la Bibliotheque Nationale", Paris, 1895, nos. 140 and 176.) This piece was also cast as one piece, and has hand punched and chased details. (Another analogous example is seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 1985, no. 312.) This piece sits on an attractive custom marble and plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1226091
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare piece is a Roman glass ingot that dates circa late 1st century B.C.-late 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches in diameter by 1.5 inches high, and is a solid piece with a uniform shape. This piece has a beautiful deep purple/black color, and has an analogous color to the rare early blown Roman vessels such as the Portland Vase. This piece was spun on a rod, and was then broken off when cooled, as the flat bottom has a pontil-mark. The top of this attractive piece is slightly rounded, and the overall shape of this piece is very esoteric. The deep purple color of this piece was the color of the Emperors, and was highly prized by the Roman elite. This piece was likely made for transport to a highly specialized workshop which could create a masterwork glass vessel such as a bowl or a pitcher, and in addition, this piece was a valuable commodity due to it's color and fine quality. This may be the reason why this piece was made as an ingot, as the color and quality of this glass ingot was very desirable in another market, and it's quite possible this piece was produced in a glassmaking center such as Sidon. This piece has a light multi-iridescent patina with minute root marking, ground marks, and spalls. The patina is also thicker in the low relief areas of the pontil-mark on the bottom of the piece. A Roman glass example of this type was offered in Christies Antiquites, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 88., and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C., is approximately 2.4 inches in diameter, and is composed of dark purple, white, yellow, and gold colored bands. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Another Roman glass example of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 1999, no. 96, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., is approximately 2 inches in diameter, and is composed of mosaic-pattern colors of white, red, white, and dark purple. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $1,725.00 realized.) This superb piece has a great deal of eye appeal, a beautiful deep purple color, and is a rare Roman glass object that is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom clear Plexiglas base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #944741
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,165.00
The beautiful pieces offered here is a matching set of Greek silver earrings, that date circa 6th century B.C. These pieces are made of solid silver, are not plated or have a bronze core, and they have an attractive dark gray patina. These pieces are approximately 1 inch high and .64 inches wide near the base. The upper half narrows into a point, which allowed these earrings to pass through a pierced ear. There is some flex to these pieces even now, and they could easily be worn today. The shape of this type of earring is known as a "boat-shaped type", and they have two additional decorative rosette pattern knobs that are seen on each side. Each of these minute round knobs were individually added, and these earrings were made with a great deal of skill, although they have a simple design. Greek silver jewelry from this time frame, circa 550 B.C., is scarce, as most Greek silver jewelry dates to the later Hellenistic Period, circa 336 B.C. (A Greek silver fibula with analogous workmanship is seen in The Belgrade National Museum and is published in "Balkani" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2008, no. 73.) The earrings offered here are intact and have no repair/restoration, and are in exceptional mint condition. An earring stand is included, along with a gift box. Ex: Private German collection. (These pieces have additional documentation for the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: