Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,800.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large and rare piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This coin is a mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), Thasos silver tetradrachm, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club and cloaked in the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "Herakles"; and below reads "Thasos", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1100413
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive little piece is a Roman glass flask that dates circa mid 1st century A.D. This piece is an early Roman glass vessel that was produced during the early Roman Imperial period. This mint quality vessel is approximately 2.4 inches high, and is in flawless condition. This piece is a deep blue color, and is from a class of Roman glass vessels known as a "cobalt-blue" type. This deep blue color was produced by adding cobalt into the glass, and this color was extremely popular with the Roman elite during the early Imperial period. This scarce vessel has some nice multi-iridescence and some spotty minute root marking, along with some white calcite deposits that are seen mostly on the rounded bottom base of the vessel. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal and is a scarce type with excellent color. For the type see, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 98, p. 51. This piece also comes with a black plexiglas stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #854857
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This impressive piece is a Hellenistic Greek silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C. to the early 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several strands of silver in an intricate interwoven pattern, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .39 inches in diameter. The clasp is made from bronze and is very durable and can be used even today. There are two cylindrical terminal ends which attach to the bronze clasp, and these terminal ends have an attractive wire band "S" type pattern within. This "S" type pattern is a Hellenistic Greek convention of art as well. The central round hoop also has this pattern, and the round hoop may have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could only have been owned by a wealthy individual, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a valuable material in antiquity. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as well as today, because of it's intrinsic visual appeal. There is also a small ancient repair seen on one side of the chain, and this piece may have been broken and subsequently repaired because of civil unrest. Another example of this type of piece was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62 (L3,500.00-L5,500.00 Pounds estimates.). The Christie's example cited here is also from the same collection as the example offered here, and both of these pieces are analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The piece offered here may easily be worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central round hoop. This piece is also a nice collectable as a piece of ancient jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This silver piece has an attractive dark grey patina and the bronze hoop has a nice light green patina. A custom necklace case is included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which can easily be repaired as well. This piece is a solid example as is, and can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1209679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting little piece is a Roman bronze scale weight that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches high by 1.4 inches wide. This piece appears to be a young cherub, with a rounded chubby face, pudgy nose, and slight smile. The eyes are also beaded silver inlay, and the beaded silver eyes lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. There is also an attached hoop at the top which attached this piece to a scale. This piece was likely filled with lead, and this piece served as a scale weight. This piece has a dark green patina, and is an exceptional example. This piece also hangs from a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1267183
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates to the Classical Period, circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches in diameter, by 1.6 inches high. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and has an exceptional gold "river patina" with some spotty dark red and brown mineral deposits. The rare gold "river patina" sometimes occurs on ancient Greek bronzes of this type, due to the metal of this piece having a high tin content, and the highly mineralized soil conditions from which this piece was buried. This piece was also hand beaten from a single sheet of bronze, and there is some weight to this piece as this piece is thick walled. In the inside center of this piece, there is a raised circular roundel known as an "omphalos", which in the ancient Greek mind represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks regarded the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. Delphi enshrined the sacred half-egg stone, which was also known as the "omphalos", and "omphalos" in Greek means "navel". The "omphalos" seen on the piece offered here is raised very high within the vessel, and also served as a finger grip on the bottom outer side, as this piece was made without any handles. This type of vessel is also known as a "libation vessel", and it is ceremonial in nature, as it was used at temple and/or funeral ceremonies. This type of vessel with it's flat bottom, and central "omphalos", was used for pouring and/or offering libations. The design elements of this type of vessel, along with the sacred symbols built into the piece, made this type of vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and was often made as a temple or grave offering. (For this type of vessel, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Co. Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp. 74-83.) The bronze piece offered here is much better than most examples, and has an exceptional patina that is seldom seen on the market. A custom Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000040. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1304240
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Roman bronze "crossbow type" fibula that dates circa early 4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition. This complete and intact piece has a main body that was cast as one piece, and there are three small decorative spheres were later added with pins. The single intact attachment pin was added to the horizontal arm, and engages in the straight section of the vertical section. This thin attachment pin still has some movement, and can move in and out of the vertical clasp, and up and down within the horizontal arm. The overall design of this attractive piece is in the form of a Latin Cross, and also represents Christ on the Cross. The "crossbow fibula" type was derived from the earlier Etruscan and Greek "bow type". The "crossbow type" fibula seen here was very common in the 4th and 5th century A.D., and is thought to have originated in the Danube region, from which it spread throughout the Roman Empire. The piece offered here is a male fibula, and was worn by soldiers, and by high ranking civil servants and officials. This piece was used primarily to fasten the cloak on the shoulder of the wearer. Many of these examples also had gold and silver gilt, and were inlaid with precious stones. The example offered here has no traces of gold and silver gilt, but it does have eight rounded holes seen in the flat section of the vertical arm, and these holes could have held mounted precious stones or glass. This piece also has a beautiful dark emerald green patina, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #782558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This nice Greek ceramic is cup that is intact and it is an attractive form. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek art from southern Italy and Greek art from Attica (mainland Greece). This piece was produced circa 375-350 B.C. and is a glossy blackware with matt pinkish red designs. Xenon ware usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. This piece has a key pattern that runs around the center of the vessel, with chevron lines above. The condition of this intact piece in mint, and has no minute breaks and/or chips. The key design is missing in sections, and this is common, as the paint was often added after the ceramic was fired and/or was a thin application. This piece has not been over painted as well. There are some spotty white calcite deposits, and some root marking. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and is a superb example for the type. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1290942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1 inch wide, is ring size 6.5, and was made for a young man or woman. This ring has an oval shaped hoop, and this shape provided for a wide face that looks very large when worn on the finger. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today as well. This piece has sections of original gold gilt seen over the bronze, and this piece has a brilliant translucent orange carnelian stone that is firmly attached to the bronze bezel. The beautiful carnelian stone was never reattached to the ring, and it is firmly in place in it's original setting. The brilliant orange carnelian stone also has a carved image of a seated animal, possibly a dog or a fox. This animal is seen on a ground line, and has raised ears and a long curled tail. The brilliant orange carnelian stone is also highly polished, has an oval shape, a flat bottom, and is clear save for a small black inclusion that is deep within the stone. This piece was also used as a personal seal/signet ring, and makes a sharp impression. The condition of this piece is superb, and has no repair/restoration with original gold gilt seen on the inner and outer surfaces of the bronze bezel. Overall, this attractive piece is in better condition than most examples of its type, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Inv. #P33-091-031915. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #1150907
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman marble that is in the form of a human hand that is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long by 2.2 inches high. This piece is nearly a complete example of a human hand, as it is broken in the upper wrist, and is a fragment from a larger statue. This piece has a light tan patina, has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and is a superb qaulity marble. The hand is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag, which is also an attribute of the Greek god Hermes/Roman god Mercury, as Hermes and Mercury were both a god of merchants that presided over trade. The hand also appears to be that of a young man, as the fingers are slender and the upper part of the hand appears to be somewhat feminine in nature. The subsequent Roman creations of Hermes were often modeled after the early Greek 4th century B.C. creation of Hermes by Praxiteles, which was found at Olympia in 1877. (For a description of this piece, see "A Handbook of Greek Art", by Gisela Richter, Phaidon Press Limited, Oxford, 1987, p. 144.) This prototype statue of Hermes by Praxiteles is a young man, with slight feminine features, and is portrayed with a convention of classical Greek art that portrayed the gods and goddesses as being eternally young. The marble piece offered here also has these features which not only point this fragment as likely being attributed to Hermes, but also illustrates an earlier Greek convention of art. (Another example approximately 2.75 inches long was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 312. 700-1,000 Pound estimates, 1,500 Pound/$2,427.00 realized.) The piece offered here is a nice scarce piece with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1142779
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This esoteric piece is a Greek Thracian bronze ring that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7-7.5, and has an even dark green patina. This cast piece is in superb condition, and can easily be worn today, as the hoop and bezel is very solid. There is some smooth wear on the inside surface which also indicates that this ring was worn for some time. This ring type dates to the Hellenistic period, and the artistic style is very simplistic, as seen with the "line-designed" stylized animal seen on the front face of the ring. This stylized animal was engraved into the front face, and is seen within an engraved circle that is seen near the edge of the front face. There are also engraved lines seen on each outer edge of the ring as well. The stylized animal has four elongated legs, a raised tail, and two ears or possibly horns. This piece was likely worn by a young adult, and the image seems to convey a great deal of animation and movement. This ring is of exceptional quality, and is a scarce example. A custom ring display stand is included, along with a ring box. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: David Liebert collection, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Attic Sessile Kantharos, that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is also classified as being of the "Saint-Valentin Class". This attractive piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is repaired from several large tight fitting fragments, and is 100% original. What makes this piece better than most examples of this type, is the bright glossy glazed surface which is seen with a deep black, a bright white, and a vibrant light orange color. This piece has on each side a dotted checker-pattern, a band of laurel in added white, and vertical lines seen above and below. The dotted checker-pattern is very detailed, and is designed in a rectangular box like a tesserae floor mosaic. This piece also has a black dot pattern on the bottom, and a deep black glaze is seen within the vessel. There are also some white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom surface as well. Another analogous vessel of this type and condition is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Morven Collection of Ancient Art", New York, June 2004, no. 362. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here has an exceptional glossy surface with a detailed painted design, is a better example than most pieces of this type, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288894
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek silver spoon that dates circa 3rd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This rare piece is approximately 4.9 inches long, by .9 inches in diameter at the bowl. This piece was hand beaten into shape, and the bowl was formed over a mold and attached to the shaft. There are five holes seen in the base of the bowl, and this piece likely served as a rare spice strainer at the table of a wealthy individual. There is also a curled hoop at the end, and this likely was hung in an ancient kitchen/household. This piece may also have served in a commercial capacity, and may also have been used to measure out a valuable "powder" type commodity. This specialized silver piece is seldom seen on the market, as it has fine construction and is seldom found as an individual type find. This piece also is somewhat analogous to the late Hellenistic silver spoon that is known as a "cochleare", as this type of piece also has a small rounded bowl which is attached to a shaft with a pointed terminal end. This type of "cochleare" spoon does not have any holes in the bottom of the bowl, and is thought to have been used for eating eggs and shellfish. For the "cochleare" type see: "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate" by D.E. Strong, Methuen & CO., Ltd., 1966, p. 155. The piece offered here also has an attractive dark gray patina, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This dainty little piece is an exceptional example of Greek silver plate, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: