Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #613883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Greek terracotta is in the form of a molded weight. This tan terracotta piece dates circa 4th century B.C. and is a rare type of terracotta, as there are very few known weights that are fashioned from terracotta. The advantage of forming a weight from terracotta is that one can mold an exact size, thus producing a piece with an exact weight. This piece has ten round stamped seals that bear the form of a hippocamp, with two on side A, two on side B, three on side C, two on side D, and one on the bottom. These ten seals seen on this piece may indicate a unit of weight and this weight was used to keep the warp threads perpendicular on verticle looms. These weights were suspended from the threads with the help of rings, that were probably made of metal, and these were attached to the holes in the weight. The round hole seen near the top allowed this piece to suspend and swivel on the metal rings. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high by 2 inches wide at the center. The shape of the body tapers at the top, which allowed this piece to freely pivot and move on its attached ring swivel. There are sections of calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and much of the original outer surface remains. If you collect ancient textiles, this would be an interesting addition to your collection. For another weight of this type see Lila Marangou, "Ancient Greek Art, N.P. Goulandris Collection", Athens, Greece, 1996, no. 216. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This Roman silver eagle is nothing short of a masterpiece. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C. to the 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242952
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian red-figure plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 6.4 inches in diameter by 1.7 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the TPS Painter, and this workshop produced several of the best Apulian painters for the period. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, but more importantly, this vessel has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this appealing piece has a head of a woman facing left, who is seen wearing a sakkos, large earrings painted white, and a white dotted necklace. There is a plate seen at the front of the bust, and a palmate pattern seen behind. The plate may also be a symbol that denoted the TPS Painter. In addition, there are two triple dotted patterns, along with two ivy leaf symbols seen within the field. There is a wave pattern, an ivy leaf pattern, and a orange and black line pattern that is seen framing the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a dark black reserve seen at the bottom, along with a footed base. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel. This piece is analogous to the example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. (This analogous Christie's piece, also attributed to the TPS Painter, was offered with another Apulian plate attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the Painter of Zurich 2660. Both of these plates are also of nearly the same size and quality as the example offered here. Both of these pieces were offered together as one lot, and had a $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimate, and both pieces together realized $8,750.00. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the TPS Painter, Darius-Underworld workshop, see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1027193
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This extremely rare piece is an early Islamic glass flask, circa 6th-8th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is a light green color with multi-colored iridescence that is seen on various inner and outer sections of the vessel. This piece is rather thick walled, has a fairly wide indented bottom, a short tubular neck that has a slight flattening at the base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. In addition, the neck is folded to the inside, and there are three stepped bulges seen within the neck which are a light yellow, green, and purple color. This piece is likely an early example of Islamic glass, due to the overall fabric of the vessel and the neck design as noted above. This piece is from an extremely rare early Islamic glass group, and some of these extremely rare pieces from this group are also listed as "possibly Sassanian", but given the probable region, i.e. Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot, where this piece was likely manufactured, a Sassanian attribution from modern day central Iran is highly unlikely. This piece, as being from this extremely rare early Islamic glass group, is also one of the earliest Islamic glass examples recorded. An analogous example listed as "possibly Islamic and of possible Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot manufacture", approximately 2.5 inches high, is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John B. Hayes, Royal Ontario Museum Pub., 1975, no. 670. (See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example is seen in Sotheby Park Bernet Inc., Important Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1978, no. 138. (This piece is nearly the same size as the piece offered here, and is listed as "probably later Sassanian or early Islamic, circa 5th-8th century A.D.") The example offered here has a type of construction within the neck that required a great deal of skill, and is more advanced than the typical late Roman blown glass that is seen in the 4th-5th century A.D. Islamic glass also tends to have several colors within the glass, in contrast to the Sassanian culture, which was known for producing faceted cut glass that was more uniform in color. The Sassanian culture, circa 6th-8th century A.D., was from central modern day Iran, and was very skilled at glass production, and they are known for being able to take a solid cube of glass and carve/sculpt this into a faceted cup, bowl, or a plate. The exceptional small flask offered here is not only in mint condition, but it is also a type that is not seen on the market or in private collections. This extremely rare piece is a little gem and would be an excellent addition to a collection of ancient glass. Ex: Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This coin is a mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), Thasos silver tetradrachm, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club and cloaked in the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "Herakles"; and below reads "Thasos", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #595233
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive Greek bronze plaque dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches long by 3.25 inches high, and has extremely high relief that is approximately 1.3 inches. This piece is an Eros that is seen pulling a rope around the neck of a panther. The panther is seen facing the viewer and the body of Eros is twisted towards the viewer as well. The scene is framed by Greek palmettes and scrolls. This applique probably was part of a bronze hydria or a bronze vessel of some type, and is a scarce example. The panther was sacred to Dionysus and the Eros seen here may be a representation of Dionysus as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This intact piece is complete, and has no breaks or chips. This attractive piece is mounted on a custom metal stand. Ex: Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, New York. Published in Gods and Mortals 1989, no.13. ($3750.00 fixed price list.) Ex: New York private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #595357
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This Greek bronze oinochoe is known as a "votive pendant" and dates from the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2 inches high and is mounted on a custom clear/marble stand with clay, so it can easily be removed. This piece was votive and was used as an offering in a temple, or a grave, and was also made for use as an offering at an oracle site such as Dodona or Delphi. This piece is in the form of an oinochoe which was used primarily for pouring wine, and as a sacred offering, it served as a wine offering as well. This piece has a dark brown/green patina and there are heavy mineral deposits seen on the inside of the vessel. An interesting piece and an early Greek bronze. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #778770
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This banded white and light yellow marble Sumerian stamp seal is in the form of a recumbent fox and dates circa 3500-2900 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 1.25 inches long and is an exceptional example for the type. This esoteric piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the top to the bottom center, and there are two animals seen on the flat back side that were carved into the piece. The overall carving of this piece is very detailed and represents a high degree of workmanship, as this piece was produced at the very dawn of civilization when city-states were first formed. The two animals, seen on the back flat side, appear to be identical and served as a stamp and/or seal, and may have represented value in a transaction. This mint quality stamp seal/amulet appears to be a fox, as the head is very angular, along with the raised ears. ( For another analogous example see Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Ada Small Moore Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Seals", New York, Dec. 1991, no. 3, $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates. ) This piece was probably part of a necklace, and the vertical bow drilled hole allowed this piece to hang with other seals/amulets of this type. This translucent piece has some spotty mineral deposits, and these deposits can be seen within the eyes, and become darker when one looks through this piece into a lighted background. ( See attached photo. ) This eerie effect makes this piece look alive, and the deposits seen within the eyes may in part be original inlay. Only a skilled artist could achieve this visual effect. This exceptional piece is mounted on a custom plexiglas stand, can easily lift off the stand, and can be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora which dates to the 2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1267080
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This nice piece is a Greek Cycladic marble idol that dates to the Early Bronze Age III, circa 2100-2300 B.C. This intact piece is approximately 4.5 inches high by 2.25 inches wide at the wider lower body, has no apparent repair/restoration, and is in better condition than most examples. This piece is intact, and is complete save for a small chip to the end of the left arm, and is a scarce variant with the "hair knot" that is seen at the top right side of the oval designed head. This piece also has a nice light gray patina with some minute black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a representative of the female body, as the lower section of this piece has a lower rounded torso, and may represent a fertility figurine. This piece has an elongated neck, two knobby arms, a "violin-shaped" body, and this type of piece is also known as a "Violin-type Cycladic Idol". This piece also has an additional scarce feature which is also known as a "top hat", a "top and/or hair knot", or a "cranial lateral projection". This scarce stylized figurine with the "hair knot" is a variant of a class of idol that is found in the Cyclades, and also elsewhere in the ancient Near East. This variant has been called the "Kusura type" by Colin Renfrew, circa 1969, after the site where a number of examples were discovered. This type has also been found in Western Anatolia at sites such as Samos, Lebedos, Troy, and Karatas-Semayuk, and this may indicate that this type has a Western Anatolian origin. An analogous example was sold in Bonham's Antiquities, April 2010, no. 305, (This analogous piece is described as an "Anatolian Marble Idol, circa 2700-2100 B.C.", 3.9 inches high, a disk-shaped head with a lateral projection, repaired neck, and sold for $4,255.00 including premium. See attached photo.) The piece offered here simply hangs from a custom metal stand that has a heavy base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon" or "cothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well, and are scarce in this "as found" condition. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #599546
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful piece is a Viking/Thracian silver bracelet that dates circa 6th-9th century A.D. This complete piece is intact, and it is a solid and durable example. This beautiful piece is approximately 2.9 inches in diameter on the outside, and 2 inches in diameter on the inside. This piece is heavy and is approximately .45 inches thick, and is fairly uniform in thickness all the way around the piece. This piece has what appears to be two stylized mythical animals on the terminal ends and they may represent horse heads or sea dragons. These animals are spiritual in nature, and they seem to exude a calm demeanor. This piece may have been made for a young prince, and may have been votive as well. This piece was made from one solid sheet of silver and was hammered and rolled into the round form seen here. The designs were then stamped into the metal, and the terminal ends were sealed at each end with a flat piece. The stamped round eyes are also very analogous in design to many carved Viking animal heads that were often used to adorn the prows of their warships and bedposts. (See the carved wooden bedpost from the Gokstad ship burial in "The Vikings" by M. Magnusson, Osprey Pub., 2006, p. 144.) This piece is also hollow, as it was formed from one sheet of hammered silver. This piece has an attractive light gray patina and has nice eye appeal. This scarce type piece was reportedly found in northern Europe, and is a design type that originated in ancient Thrace. A custom metal stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: