Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150248
Apolonia Ancient Art
$198.00
This extremely fine coin is a late Roman bronze 1/2 Centenionalis, 20 mm, that was minted by the Roman emperor Constans circa 348-350 A.D. Flavius Julius Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I (the Great) and Fausta, born 320 A.D. He later shared the empire with his two brothers, Constantine II and Constanyius II., and later was raised to the title of "Augustus" circa 337-350 A.D. In 348-350 Constans carried out a reform of the bronze coinage, and the coin offered here falls within this period. The obverse shows the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Constans facing right, with the legend: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG around. The line design of the hair is seen in very sharp detail. The reverse ahows a standing Phoenix facing right with a rediate crown, standing on a pyre, with the legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO around, ASIS below. The Phoenix seen standing on the reverse is also one of the few examples of a Phoenix bird that is seen on Roman coinage, and this is a rare symbol relative to Roman numismatics. This coin has a glossy dark green patina, and is EF/EF- grade. (Another example was recently sold by CNG, Auction 279, May 2012, no. 635, for $204.00.) This coin has a rare Roman symbol, and is a scarce Roman coin type. Sear 4009, R.I.C. 332. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #859366
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This nice Egyptian vessel is an aryballos which probably held a cosmetic and/or a precious unguent. This piece dates to the Late Period, circa 550-330 B.C., and is approximately 2.5 inches high. This intact piece has a nice dark brown patina with some minute wear on the outer rim, which indicates this piece was used in antiquity and was not a votive object. This piece also has two small lug handles which allows one to easily grip this vessel. This piece is also very translucent when it is back lit and/or when it is placed outside in the daylight. This piece sits on a custom marble black base and an old French collector tag is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: S. Linde collection, Berlin, Germany. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this superb condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and is a beautiful little gem. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1113374
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This superb little gem is a Greek silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great in Babylon, circa 323 B.C. This coin is in superb to mint state in condition, weighs approximately 4.2 gms, and is perfectly centered on both sides. The obverse shows a portrait of Alexander the Great, facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, facing left, and is seen holding an eagle on his extended right arm. The name PHILIP is seen behind, and Philip III Arrhidaeus, half brother of Alexander was to share the throne with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king. The real power still lay behind the generals-Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolemy and others-who were all biding their time for power. The coin seen here likely was minted by Antigonos, who had control of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. Alexander is also seen as a god on the obverse of this coin, as the face has pronounced upturned eyes which signify Alexander as a deified god. This coin is a superb example for the type, and the artistic style of the obverse portrait of Alexander is very fine. Sear no.6750. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #941556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian brown terracotta mold that was likely used to form a faience amulet. This intact piece is approximately 1.6 inches high, is intact with no repair/restoration, and dates to the Late Period, circa 716-30 B.C. This piece shows the standing figure of the pregnant hippopotamus-headed goddess Thoeris, otherwise known as Taweret, who the the protector of women during childbirth. The image of this goddess is often seen as faience amulets, and an image of this goddess was also attached to beds, head-rests, and cosmetic articles. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom stand, along with a clay impression of the mold, and both of these can easily be removed. Molds of this type are scarce on the market, and are seldom seen. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,975.00
This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 11.5 and 13.5 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian red-figure plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 6.4 inches in diameter by 1.7 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the TPS Painter, and this workshop produced several of the best Apulian painters for the period. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, but more importantly, this vessel has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this appealing piece has a head of a woman facing left, who is seen wearing a sakkos, large earrings painted white, and a white dotted necklace. There is a plate seen at the front of the bust, and a palmate pattern seen behind. The plate may also be a symbol that denoted the TPS Painter. In addition, there are two triple dotted patterns, along with two ivy leaf symbols seen within the field. There is a wave pattern, an ivy leaf pattern, and a orange and black line pattern that is seen framing the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a dark black reserve seen at the bottom, along with a footed base. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel. This piece is analogous to the example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. (This analogous Christie's piece, also attributed to the TPS Painter, was offered with another Apulian plate attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the Painter of Zurich 2660. Both of these plates are also of nearly the same size and quality as the example offered here. Both of these pieces were offered together as one lot, and had a $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimate, and both pieces together realized $8,750.00. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the TPS Painter, Darius-Underworld workshop, see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1182861
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This piece is a Greek bronze finger ring that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7.5, and likely was made for a young man or woman. This piece has a flat face, with a beveled back face, and an attached ring hoop. This piece is very solid, is in superb to mint condition, and can easily be worn today. The back beveled face also allows this piece to easily slip on and off the finger. There is some slight wear to the back face, and this is a good indication that this piece was worn by a living person, and simply was not solely a votive object. This piece has sharp engraving, and the engraved composition has detailed deep relief. This piece shows a flying Nike facing left, and a seated draped woman below who may represent Ledo. The flying Nike was the Greek god of victory, and this example has wings above and is holding a victory wreath in front. The Nike is in the act of crowning the victor with the wreath, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on Hellenistic coinage and objects. The seated woman who may represent Leto, made love to Zeus, and she bore him the great archer-deities Apollo and his sister Artemis. The combination of these two symbols seen on this ring is very powerful, and likely offered the wearer "victory in life". This ring may have been used used a personal signet seal ring as well, as it makes a sharp impression. (See the attached photos showing the ring impression that was done in soft clay.) This ring has a nice dark green patina with some minute dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is a superb example for the type, and is a scarce example. (For the type, see J. Spier, "Ancient Gems and Finger Rings", Malibu, 1992, no. 85.) A custom black velvet ring stand is included. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #943369
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This piece is a superb Roman silver ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is solid silver and was cast as one piece, then it was chased and cold worked after the casting. This piece is approximately a size 8, is 7/16 inches wide at the top, and has a light grey patina. There is some very minute wear on the inner surface which can be seen under magnification, and this is a good indication of authenticity. This piece has two stylized heads that come together in the center, and these resemble dolphin heads, but may be cow/bull heads as well. These heads are so stylized that they could be spirit animals as well, and as such, this piece could have originally come from the ancient Roman regions of Thrace or Germania, where many ancient animal cults were active into the Roman period. This ring could be either a "protector" type ring, or a "power" type ring that captured the power of the animal. This piece is very durable, as it was cast as a solid piece, and can easily be worn today. This piece comes with a gift box and a custom ring stand. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This unique piece is a stamped plaque that is made from lead. This piece is Italic, and dates circa mid 16th to the late 17th century A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 2.7 inches wide, by 2.1 inches high, and by .15 inches thick. The shape of this piece is oval, and as such, was likely an inlay for a furniture piece or a box, rather than part of a large pendant for a necklace and/or pectoral. The backside of this piece is flat, and this piece was made in the same fashion as a Roman bronze sestertius or Renaissance medallion coin would have been made, with a carved die that was hand struck into the prepared heated lead flan. This method of manufacture allowed one to make several examples of this piece, however, the piece offered here may be the only recorded example, as our research has not found any other pieces. In fact, all of these lead plaques are very rare, as lead is very soft and is easy to damage, melts very easily, and can simply be easily used later on to make other objects. The piece offered here has a light brown patina with a thin oxidized crust over the outer surface, moreover, the condition of this piece is superb with no major tears, dents, or scraps as lead is a very soft material. There are also micro black dendrites which indicate that this piece has been buried for quite some time. There is a small hole seen at the top which may have held an attachment pin. This piece shows a seated, virile figure that is seen half draped, and is seen holding a round object in his extended right hand which may be an apple. This seated figure appears to be examining and looking at the round object that he is seen holding up in front of himself, and there is a strong possibility that the figure is the Trojan prince Paris, who is contemplating as to whom he should award the prize. According to Greek myth, it was Paris who was chosen by the gods to decide which of the three goddesses - Juno, Minerva, or Venus - was the fairest, and the prize was an apple. Venus won the prize who in turn awarded Paris the mortal Helen, and this triggered the Trojan War. The Trojan prince Aeneas, subsequently fled the ruins of Troy to found the city of Rome, as praised by the Roman poet Virgil, who prophesied a "new golden age" as founded by Augustus, the first or Roman emperors. Virgil, Horace, and Propertius, who are considered the greatest writers in Roman literature, all embraced Augustus' propaganda campaign in creating the "myth of Augustus", which fostered the idea that Augustus was the one chosen by the gods to preside over the new empire. This literary propaganda campaign legitimized Augustus' hold on power after the bloody civil wars, and in the same context, there are several Roman works of art that served the same purpose. The piece offered here points back to the founding of Rome, and another rare Roman work of art that is considered by many academics to fit into this category is the Portland Vase, and the seated figure seen on the Portland Vase known as "Figure E" is thought to be Paris as well. The artistic style of "Figure E" is also very analogous to the seated figure seen on the piece offered here, as both are seated, both are nude except for drapery that falls over the thighs, both have a virile muscular build, and both have the same type of hair style. (See "Glass of the Caesars" by Donald Harden, The British Museum Pub., London, 1987, p. 59.) The piece offered here was also examined by Dr. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, who dated this piece, and in addition, he thought there was a strong possibility that the maker of this piece saw the Portland Vase. The seated figure seen on the piece offered here is seen centered in front of a fountain with a lion's head spout. There are also architectural elements seen at the back of the seated figure, including a building with a round dome that may be a representation of the Pantheon. The overall scene may be one set in the Campus Martius (Field of Mars), and is the location where Augustus was cremated and where his Mausoleum was built. The piece offered here is an important work of Italic Renaissance art, according to Dr. Fischer-Bossert, but this piece is obviously in need of further academic study. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private English collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1100413
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive little piece is a Roman glass flask that dates circa mid 1st century A.D. This piece is an early Roman glass vessel that was produced during the early Roman Imperial period. This mint quality vessel is approximately 2.4 inches high, and is in flawless condition. This piece is a deep blue color, and is from a class of Roman glass vessels known as a "cobalt-blue" type. This deep blue color was produced by adding cobalt into the glass, and this color was extremely popular with the Roman elite during the early Imperial period. This scarce vessel has some nice multi-iridescence and some spotty minute root marking, along with some white calcite deposits that are seen mostly on the rounded bottom base of the vessel. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal and is a scarce type with excellent color. For the type see, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 98, p. 51. This piece also comes with a black plexiglas stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric period circa 750-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are conical in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. These beads have an attractive dark green patina, and are all in superb condition. These beads are strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, as well as being votive, and are now scarce in the market. As a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #590960
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This nice Roman glass flask dates circa 2nd century AD and is in mint condition, with no breaks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 7.4 inches high and is a light green color. There are heavier surface deposits seen on one side, and this suggests a burial pattern. There are spotty mineral deposits and areas of muti-colored iridescence seen in sections of the vessel. This vessel is larger than most examples, as it has a tall elongated neck, and is a nice example. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this vessel is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246443
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This esoteric piece is a Roman bronze herm that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece is also complete, and has no restoration/repair. This piece has the typical Roman herm design, which is a square designed lower body, small square side handles that are seen just below the shoulders, and an attached bust seen at the top. The design of this attractive bronze is an imitation of a large marble or bronze sculpture, which was normally erected in front of private homes as a "protector type" object. The piece offered here was likely part of a private shrine that was inside of a private home or temple. What makes the design of this piece not so typical, is the realistic and young satyr head which has a young, sweet appearance. The head is seen slightly tilted to the right, and the thin neck, detailed hair, and upturned horns seen on the upper forehead is very esoteric. An analogous type/example is seen in Bonham's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 298. (800-1000 Pound estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a scarce example, as it has great artistic style and eye appeal. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can be easily removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: