Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1237394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This x-rare piece is a Greek bronze shield boss that dates from the Geometric Period, circa 9th-8th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, is approximately 98-99% original, and has some minute crack fill. This piece has six spokes, that radiate from the raised center, and this raised center has a point which served as a weapon in the center of the shield. This piece was likely attached in the center of a concave round wooden shield, as this bronze piece is also concave in shape. The back side of this interesting piece has an attached knob with a hole in the center, and a cord ran through this and a hole in the center of the shield. This cord served as a handle for the shield owner, and this shield boss thus also served as an "umbo", which simply defines this piece as a "protective handle". This piece also has incised line design seen on the six spokes, and a line designed circle which contains a herringbone design. This type of "line design" is also an artistic hallmark of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on bronzes and ceramics for the period. This piece is also analogous to an example seen in "Macedonia, Thrace, and Illyria" by Stanley Casson, Clarendon Press, Oxford, U.K., 1925, Figs. 59 and 60. (See attachment.) This piece has a nice multi-colored patina with light blues and greens, and has spotty dark brown mineral deposits. The extremely rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market, and is an ancient Greek work of armor from a period that first saw the production of Greek arms in bronze. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #859366
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This nice Egyptian vessel is an aryballos which probably held a cosmetic and/or a precious unguent. This piece dates to the Late Period, circa 550-330 B.C., and is approximately 2.5 inches high. This intact piece has a nice dark brown patina with some minute wear on the outer rim, which indicates this piece was used in antiquity and was not a votive object. This piece also has two small lug handles which allows one to easily grip this vessel. This piece is also very translucent when it is back lit and/or when it is placed outside in the daylight. This piece sits on a custom marble black base and an old French collector tag is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: S. Linde collection, Berlin, Germany. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #941556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian brown terracotta mold that was likely used to form a faience amulet. This intact piece is approximately 1.6 inches high, is intact with no repair/restoration, and dates to the Late Period, circa 716-30 B.C. This piece shows the standing figure of the pregnant hippopotamus-headed goddess Thoeris, otherwise known as Taweret, who the the protector of women during childbirth. The image of this goddess is often seen as faience amulets, and an image of this goddess was also attached to beds, head-rests, and cosmetic articles. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom stand, along with a clay impression of the mold, and both of these can easily be removed. Molds of this type are scarce on the market, and are seldom seen. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1247108
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,865.00
These two superb bronze plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, and date circa 5th-3rd century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 4.25 inches long by 2.3 inches high, and have an attractive dark brown/black patina with gold gilt and dark red highlights. There is also some minute root marking seen mostly on the back side of each piece, and there is some dark green mineralization seen in sections of each piece as well. Both pieces have very little wear, were likely votive, and were both cast from the lost-wax process, while the wax model was formed in a two-piece mold. These pieces were made as a matching pair, and were possibly attached to a wooden sarcophagus, a burial garment, or the most likely, a leather belt. This type of piece is usually found in pairs, which may also tie in with the "master of the animals" cult that was associated with many cultures in the ancient Near East circa 1000-100 B.C. These plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, which was located in modern day Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. Most Ordos bronzes of this type can also be associated with the Xiongnu, who were a Mongolian steppes nomadic tribe that had to contend with the Chinese during the Han period. The term "Ordos bronzes" has been applied rather indiscriminately to all "animal style" objects found in the vast northern border areas with China, irrespective of place of discovery or dating. What is known is that the two plaques offered here stylistically match other examples found in Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. For the type see "Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes: The Eugene V. Thaw and Other New York Collections", Yale University Press, 2002. The pieces offered here show a standing animal which resembles a wolf, which is seen devouring it's prey, which appears to be a horned ibex. The horned ibex is seen with it's head in the mouth of the wolf, and it's curved horn is seen on the ground, as head of the ibex is seen turned around with a twisted elongated neck. In addition, the ibex may be a young baby animal, which may also explain the size difference between both the ibex and the wolf, but in reality, the ibex portrayed on these plaques may be an adult animal, and the carnivorous wolf may have been designed in an oversized manner to portray a more powerful creature. The wolf may also represent a "spirit animal" and may not be a wolf, but rather a creature that somewhat resembles a wolf or a feline. The creature portrayed here has a curled tail like a feline, and an elongated snout like a wolf, and the creature seen here may be a combination of both animals. The ibex head can also be best seen with the entire piece being viewed upside down, which is a convention of art that is common to the Ordos culture. (See attached close up photo.) This piece also has an attachment hook seen in the top center of the wolf's back, a small hole seen in the tip of the tail, and another hole designed within the ibex horn and front leg. These were the three points as to how this piece could have been attached to a leather belt with leather ties. These plaques have a very powerful image, and may have served as a "power type" piece for the wearer. Additional pieces of this type can be seen in "Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes" by Ariadne Galleries, New York, 1998. The pieces offered here are in superb to mint condition, have a high degree of eye appeal, and are better examples of this type that are normally seen. These pieces also are attached within an attractive black wooden framed shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1243846
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive Roman bronze is a standing nude figurine of Mercury, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This charming piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and is a complete intact example. This piece has no breaks and/or cracks, is in superb condition, and has a beautiful deep dark green emerald patina; with some minute white/light green mineral deposits that are seen mostly in the low relief sections, along with some spotty light green deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This nude figurine is seen standing on a flat base, and Mercury is seen holding a winged caduceus in his left arm, and a money bag in his extended right hand. He is also seen wearing a winged petasos (hat), and a chlamys (cloak), which is seen draped over his left shoulder next to the caduceus. The chlamys also falls behind his left shoulder, and accents the erotic designed back side of this attractive Mercury. Mercury, also known as the Greek god Hermes, was the god of business and commerce. Mercury was also the messenger of the gods, patron of travelers, athletes, and merchants. This superb Mercury figurine also has detailed erotic body molding, with two open dotted eyes, a punched round navel, and exposed genitalia which are prominently seen. These details give this piece a great deal of eye appeal, and is a better example than most pieces of this type. In addition, this piece has a small square hole that is seen above the right eye, and this probably supported a small silver diadem which plugged into this minute small hole. This small silver diadem ran under the winged petasos, and a small groove can be seen where this ran around the forehead. Decorative silver bands and/or rings were often added to bronze Roman Mercury figurines of this type as an offering to the god. An analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XIX, 2008, no. 52. (Approximately 3 inches high, $4,750.00. estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also mounted on a custom wooden and black Plexiglas display stand, and can be easily removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this superb condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and is a beautiful little gem. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1199056
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic oinochoe that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This charming little piece is approximately 5.5 inches high. This piece is an Attic blackware ceramic that has an incised designed theater mask in the form of a light red bearded man with a white diadem. This extremely rare example was also produced in the "Six's Technique", as seen with the red beard of the theatre mask with incised hair detail, and the face and diadem with white painted details. According to Joseph Noble in "The Techniques of Painted Attic Pottery", Watson-Guptill Pub., New York, 1965, p. 66: "SIX'S TECHNIQUE: Six's technique of East Greek origin, was usually employed on small vases such as lekythoi, phialai, skyphoi, and Nicosthenic amphorae. It made use of the added white, pink, and red. In this technique the picture was painted with a brush, applying the color to the surface of the vase which had been coated with the black glaze matter, and sometimes details or other figures were added by incision. The vase was then subjected to the usual Attic three-stage firing. This was an interesting technique; the pottery is attractive and has a spontaneous quality, but it is somewhat crude, lacking the refinement of the conventional black-figure or red-figure work." This Attic piece is extremely rare to rare with this type of "Six's technique" design, and in addition, incised theater masks of this type seen on Attic ceramics is not often seen on the market. This piece is also classified as "Type 5B", according to the "John D. Beazley Shape Chart", and is an extremely rare type which is only seen circa early 5th century B.C. This complete piece is repaired from several fragments, and has only over paint where the pieces have come together, and overall, is an extremely fine example with a nice deep black glaze. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #593674
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This mint state silver tetrobol (four obols) was minted in northern Greece in the fortress city of Olynthos. This quality piece was minted circa 420-400 BC and is an early issue for the mint. The obverse has Apollo wearing a wreath and the reverse features his lyre. The name of Olynthos runs around the lyre. Olynthos was the center of the Chalkidian League and issued a series of coins with beautiful heads of Apollo. This classical period coin shows the early head of Apollo for the series, which is known as the "severe style". This style also best represents archaic period Greek sculpture. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075389
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts two hunters slaying two running deer. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 9.9 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and has very vibrant black, light blue, yellow, red, white, and brown colors. One side of this page has two lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are three lines of script seen in the upper left side margin. In addition, there is a single line of script seen in the upper left side corner of the fine-line drawn scene. The back side of this detailed document has 21 lines of script, and there are several lines of script that appear to be added notes that are seen in the left margin of the page and between several lines of the text. The fine-line drawn scene has two hunters on horseback, and they are hunting two deer, as one hunter shoots an arrow into a jumping deer, while the other chases a running deer with a sword. The scene has very vibrant colors, and the sky above the light blue mountains, the saddle blankets, the arrow quivers, and the sword are all highlighted with a gold gilt. The light blue mountains and foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, and in combination with the gold gilt highlights, give the scene an ethereal perspective. The scene may also represent a Persian myth of the hero Rostam, who carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Fourth Stage" of this myth involves Rostam traveling on horseback through an enchanted territory where he finds provisions including a ready roasted deer. This myth is likely what is portrayed on the manuscript page offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #987545
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Greek Apulian Chous that shows a theatrical mask, which is seen in profile facing right, and dates circa 380-350 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair/restoration or overpaint. This rare piece also has very vibrant colors, which are a glossy black, light red, and white. There are also some heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel, on the edge of the trefoil mouth, and on the bottom base ring. The detailed theatrical mask is seen within a light red frame which has a floral design at the bottom, and there are several attractive white dot highlights seen within this light red frame as well. The theatrical mask depicted on this piece is a type used by a character in a Greek comedy play known as a "phylax play", and this type of mask was designed with bushy black hair, short black beard, open mouth, and copious facial wrinkles. This type of mask was defined by Trendall as "Type B", and was likely produced by the Truro Painter, circa 380-350 B.C., on Greek Apulian chous vessels of this type. Trendall also stated that the heads of the Truro Painter "often wear white head-bands", and the detailed theatrical mask seen on the piece offered here also has a very prominent white head-band. (See A.D. Trendall, "Phlyax Vases", Second Edition, BICS Supplement 20, 1967. Another vessel of this type is seen in the Virginia Museum in Richmond, Virginia, no. 81.53.) The theatrical mask seen on the vessel offered here, and the vessel noted above, are both designed as a singular depiction, and as such, is seldom seen on Greek Apulian vessels. In addition, the mask seen here is a sharp detailed example and is rarely seen. An analogous Apulian chous of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no.195. (Approximately 7.5 inches high, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $12,500.00 realized.) Ex: Donna Jacobs Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan. Ex: Robert Novak collection, St. Louis, MO. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This scarce huge piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact and is in mint condition, save a small stress crack that is seen in the middle of the spout. The surface of this exceptional piece has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina with a rich glossy black glaze, and some spotty white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel with the facing Silenus head was mold made, and the Silenus head has very high relief and is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type do not usually have this design feature. This piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. A nice intact scarce large vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: J.J. Klejman, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #806267
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality piece is an Egyptian black basalt mace-head that dates to the Predynastic Period, Nagada I/Nagada II, circa 4000-3500 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high, and has a near perfect globular form. There is a bow drilled hole that runs through the center, and there is wear on the outer edges at each end of the hole. This may be due to the fact that a leather thong was attached through the central perforation, and could have produced wear to the outer edges of the hole at each end. A leather thong was preferred over a rigid shaft that was directly attached to the stone mace-head, because a rigid shaft may not have withstood the blows, as this weapon generated a tremendous amount of energy at the point of attack. This theory was elaborated by Winifred Needler in "Predynastic and Archaic Egypt in The Brooklyn Museum", Brooklyn, New York, 1984, p.145 and 259. The stone that this piece is made from, black basalt, is extremely dense and is one of the hardest stones to carve. The ancient Egyptians were able to carve some of their finest portrait busts from this stone, and in many cases it took years to do this and was a community effort for large scale works. The piece seen here was not easy to make, and is in itself is a work of art, although it is a weapon of war. There are nice cream colored calcite and light brown mineral deposits seen on the outer and inner surfaces of this piece, in addition to areas that have various degrees of wear. A nice weapon that is not often seen in black basalt. A custom stand is included and the piece can easily be removed, as it sits on top of the stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, Dec. 1995, no. 212. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #821520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This splendid Greek Apulian squat lekythos dates circa mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This piece has a draped woman standing to the right and she is seen looking back to the left, holding a white dotted decorative plate in her right hand, and holding a white dotted decorative wreath in her left hand. The drapery of the standing woman has very fine detail, and is better than most examples. There is a circle dot behind her body and a large palmette on the back side below the handle. For another piece of this type with a single draped woman, see Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 87 ($600.00-$900.00 estimates, $3,438.00 realized.) The piece offered here is intact, save for the spout that has been re-attached. There are spotty white calcite deposits and the overall condition is superb. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #599546
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This beautiful piece is a Viking/Thracian silver bracelet that dates circa 6th-9th century A.D. This complete piece is intact, and it is a solid and durable example. This beautiful piece is approximately 2.9 inches in diameter on the outside, and 2 inches in diameter on the inside. This piece is heavy and is approximately .45 inches thick, and is fairly uniform in thickness all the way around the piece. This piece has what appears to be two stylized mythical animals on the terminal ends and they may represent horse heads or sea dragons. These animals are spiritual in nature, and they seem to exude a calm demeanor. This piece may have been made for a young prince, and may have been votive as well. This piece was made from one solid sheet of silver and was hammered and rolled into the round form seen here. The designs were then stamped into the metal, and the terminal ends were sealed at each end with a flat piece. The stamped round eyes are also very analogous in design to many carved Viking animal heads that were often used to adorn the prows of their warships and bedposts. (See the carved wooden bedpost from the Gokstad ship burial in "The Vikings" by M. Magnusson, Osprey Pub., 2006, p. 144.) This piece is also hollow, as it was formed from one sheet of hammered silver. This piece has an attractive light gray patina and has nice eye appeal. This scarce type piece was reportedly found in northern Europe, and is a design type that originated in ancient Thrace. A custom metal stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: