Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594176
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This Chavin/Cupisnique water carrier is an early type Chavin ceramic and dates circa 900-600 B.C. This piece is intact and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or breaks. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and has a cream and light red polychrome glaze. There is some light brown burnishing seen mostly on the bottom, and there is also a very small drill hole that is seen that was done for a thermoluminescence test (TL test). This TL test was done by the prior private collector in Germany, and it was done by Kotalla Laboratory. This document is included with this piece.(The results of this test place this piece circa 600-400 B.C.) This cute piece has a friendly warm smile and projects an easy going carefree feeling. The design of the face is very simple, and comic-like, but this was probably the intent of the potter/artist. This type of piece is rare for an Andean ceramic, as most Andean cultures such as the Chavin and the Moche were based on a warrior cult that used live captives for sacrifice. The Chavin/Cupisnique produced some of the first and finest ceramics in ancient Peru, and the stirrup-spout seen on this vessel was their invention. This allowed the Chavin/Cupisnique potters to move this piece around in the kiln with a stick, and they were able to produce pieces that had bright colors with even glazes such as this piece. This water carrier may be a representation of a person, but more likely, it is an anthropomorphic form represented as being from the spirit world. There is also a face seen at the front of the main body of the vessel that may double as a clothing design. This piece may also be from the "Cupisnique" culture as noted by Richard Berger in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", page 90-99. He notes that this type of ceramic, with it's trapezoidal arch and single spout with the flaring end, are creations of the initial phase prior to the appearance of what we know as true Chavin style ceramics. The TL test seems to support this view. Most early pieces of this type have simple line design details for the eyes, nose, and other facial features/body design as this piece shows. This Chavin/Cupisnique piece is a rare, early type and is a large example. Ex: Private German collection. Ex; Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1198713
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This cute little piece is a Nazca figurine that dates circa 200-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is in mint condition with no over paint and/or restoration. This charming piece is a rounded seated figurine with modeled legs and arms and cupped hands. This figure is seen wearing a feathered headdress tied up in a central knot, and has decorative tattoos on each shoulder in the form of a stylized fish (shark?) on the right shoulder, and on the left shoulder, a possible stylized bird image. This piece has a very animated expression, and is seen with a small rounded mouth in the form of a circle, and wide open rounded eyes. This piece is also portrayed as being bare chested, as there are two small rounded red dotted breasts. There is a small spout at the top, and a strap handle at the back. This piece also has vibrant polychrome glaze in beige, brown, black, and cream colors. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 1996, no. 204. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $1,495.00 realized.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1208597
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,865.00
This scarce piece is a Mayan brownware tripod vessel, "Teotihuacan Type", that dates circa 250-450 A.D. This Mayan piece is classified as having "Teotihuacan" artistic style, and is of the type seen in "Pre-Columbian Art, The Morton D. May and The Saint Lewis Art Museum Collections" by L.A. Parsons, New York, 1980, Fig. 133. This superb piece is approximately 8.3 inches high by 12.4 inches in diameter, and is complete with some limited crack fill/repair. This piece also has some traces of red cinnabar in the low relief molded sections of the vessel, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There is a black polychrome band seen below the rim, and there are raised coffee bean symbols that are seen running around the vessel at the base of the bowl. This attractive brownware piece is supported by three hollow slab feet that show an identical trophy/death head molded design, and the bowl has a molded frieze that runs around the piece. This molded frieze is divided into three sections by incised bands, and each section has an identical impressed molded design that was repeated three times. This impressed molded design shows a Mayan ballplayer on one knee, and he is wearing a yoke around his waist, along with a helmet/headdress and other regalia. There also appears to be a speech-scroll seen running away from this figure as well. He is seen bouncing a large ball off his hip/yoke, and this large ball also appears to be depicted at the moment of impact. This figure may represent the Mayan Hero Twin "Xbalanque", who was the great mythic ballplayer in the Mayan "Popol Vuh". In addition, this impressed molded design shows a standing individual/ballplayer that is seen facing the ballplayer that is seen on one knee, and this standing individual/ballplayer has a skull-like old man facial design, and likely represents one of the Mayan Death Gods of Xibalba, which is the Mayan underworld. This standing Death God is seen holding a hanging object, and this may be a handstone, "manopla", which was used in the ballgame perhaps during the serve, or it may represent a squash, which represents a severed head of the other Hero Twin, "Hunahpu". This standing Death God may represent "God L", who was also one of the principle gods of the underworld, and was known as "Lord of the Underworld". The number three is also significant regarding the Mayan ballgame, as the Maya were thought to have played the game with three principle players on each side. It is interesting to note that this piece has three legs that each depict a trophy/death head, along with the three sections of the molded frieze which each have the three identical molded impressions as noted above. There is a total of nine molded impressions, three per section, seen within the molded frieze that runs around this piece, and the number nine is associated with the Hero Twins. (See "The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame", M. Whittington Ed., Thames and Hudson, New York, 2001, p.239, which also shows a scene which is very analogous to the scene seen on the piece offered here, and that is the Hero Twin "Xbalanque" on one knee hitting the ball with his yoke, and the standing "God L". See attached photo.) According to Linda Schele in "The Code of Kings", New York, 1998, p. 213: "Both sets of Twins (Hero Twins) confronted the Lords of Death in the ballgame, which was a symbolic form of warfare. The Hero Twins used the dance to defeat Death, and it was in the ballcourt that they resurrected their dead forebears. It was also in the ballcourt that the Maize Gods stayed after the successful Fourth Creation and the engendering of humanity. It is there that human beings must go to worship the Maize Gods." This piece was also likely ceremonial in nature, given the Mayan ballgame symbols, and may have held an offering such as a severed head, possibly from a ballplayer. The Mayan death head symbol seen on the legs of the vessel also support this theory, along with the fact that this type of piece is known as a votive offering vessel. The noted Mayan epigraphist, Dr. Mark Van Stone, has confirmed that the three legs seen on this vessel have: "a head on the leg that represents a generic trophy head" and, "his eye is closed, which suggests a captive decapitation, and his jaw is hidden by a scroll, a little like the head-variant of (Te)". This exceptional piece is scarce to rare, as most Mayan vessels of this type portray warriors and/or battle scenes, rather than a scene from the Mayan ballcourt. Another analogous vessel of this type that portrays a molded priest/warrior in flight is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 1991, no. 155. ($8,000.00-$10,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Donick Cary collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1245720
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This striking piece is a carved stone sculpture that is attributed to the Recuay culture, Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is a solid stone piece that is approximately 4.5 inches long, by 3.4 inches wide, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is a dark brown color, and has minute dark black and spotty white mineral deposits. In addition, there are faint traces of red cinnabar deposits that are seen in the low relief areas of the rounded eyes and incised teeth. This piece is an excellent example of Recuay stone sculpture, as it has sharp angular or circular lines, and flat surfaces. The Recuay culture was a highland contemporary of the Moche, and was organized into small independent militaristic polities, and their art often depicted creatures that seen to be supernatural in character. The head seen here is a supernatural feline with ears seen at the top, and a wide mouth with prominent angular designed teeth. The circular eyes, open mouth filled with teeth, and angular flat nose seen at the front, identify this creature which is often referred to as the "moon animal", because of it's association with crescents and other celestial imagery in the coeval Moche style. The so-called "moon animal", a feline or foxlike creature with a triangular form of nose projecting from its face, plays a principle role in Recuay art and is common on fine Recuay pottery. (For an analogous piece and an explanation of the "moon animal", see the "Spirit of Ancient Peru; Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., New York, 1977, no. 24, p. 93. See attached photo.) This piece offered here also reflects the Recuay monolithic stone sculpture that was free-standing or incorporated into masonry walls, and was carved so that its undecorated shaftlike back could be inserted into a wall socket while the carved supernatural visage projected out of the wall in tenonlike fashion. This type of artistic design allowed the viewer to see a piece that "comes alive" in a simplistic fashion, and as such, this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. This splendid stone piece is mounted on a custom wooden and Plexiglas stand, and is angled upwards for the viewer. Ex: Splendors of the World Gallery, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,765.00
This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is likely from the Lambayeque Valley, Peru, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is a silver with added copper metal combination with an applied coat of spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #812519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This dramatic "power" type piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is from the Peten region of the Yucatan Peninsula, which is Guatemala/southern Mexico. This exceptional piece is a Mayan green stone mask that likely was a pectoral that served as the central element in a ceremonial necklace. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches wide by 4.8 inches high, is a complete example with no repair and/or breaks, and is in superb condition save for some minor roughness at the back top. This green stone mask may be fuchsite or a diopside, as there are attractive (mica?) speckled silver inclusions that are readily seen within the stone. There are also light brown mineral deposits seen on sections of the outer surface, and dark brown mineral deposits seen in most of the lower relief sections of this piece. The Maya highly valued this type of green stone, and there are few authentic ancient Mayan green stone objects carved made from this material, and as such, this piece is rare to extremely rare . This piece was valued highly enough in that it was placed as the central component in a ceremonial necklace, and there is a bow drilled hole on each side of this mask that held it in place within the necklace. In addition, the eyes and mouth were formed into the stone by a "pecking" technique, and the back side of this piece has a concave surface. (For an anlogous designed necklace made from a similiar type green stone see "Maya" by Peter Schmidt, Ed., Rizzoli Pub., Venice, Italy, 1998, no. 140. This piece is also seen in the Museo National de Antropologia in Mexico City, Inv. no. 10-000220.) Carved green stone objects, such as the extremely rare piece offered here, were highly valued by the Maya and reinforced the high rank of individuals wearing them. In the Classic period, green stone objects and beads made for the Mayan elite actually achieved the status of "money", such was the importance and acceptance of these objects. One principle reason for this was that these green stones are the same color as sprouting maize, which represented life on earth and eternal life in the spirit world. Sacred Mayan green stone objects were passed down from generation to generation, placed in sacrificial caches, and used as grave offerings. The pectoral mask offered here is also interesting in that the design of the face resembles the Mayan hieroglyph "ahau", meaning "lord", as it is written in its simplest form. There are also many forms of this common Mayan "lord" glyph, and this "lord" glyph evolved over time, but the form of the piece offered here is closest to the simple "lord" glyph seen during the Classical period, which is also the period that this piece was produced. Both the simple "lord" glyph and the piece offered here have rounded eyes and mouth, thick lips that run around the mouth opening, and two vertical lines that run from the upper lip to the forehead that form the design of the nose and the face of the glyph. (For this theory and a chart of line drawings relative to the evolution of the "Ahau" glyph see "The Stylistic History of the Mayan Hieroglyphs", by Dr. Hermann Beyer, Tulane University Pub., New Orleans, 1932.) The fact that this mask resembles the Mayan simple "lord" glyph is not surprising, as it was probably an important Mayan lord that wore this piece in ceremony and perhaps even in death, and as such, this piece can be considered an important "power" type object. This piece is mounted on a custom metal base and can easily be removed. This piece has also been authenticated by examined in great deatil by Mr. Robert Sonin and Mr. David Joralemon in New York. Ex: Martin Falk collection, Long Island, New York (acquired circa 1960's.). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Pre-Columbian Auction, New York, Auction 46, no.125. Ex: Private French collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239393
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This attractive piece is a Vicus culture seated figurine that dates circa 200 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has a pleasing nice deep reddish-brown glaze, and has some minute root marking and some light blue/black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a stirrup-type vessel, and it has a flat bottom. The legs and arms are seen tucked in close to the seated body, and this figurine seems to exhibit an inner core that is changing from an animal form to a human form, or vice-versa. This piece is classified as a "transformation type" ceramic, and this can especially be seen with the human facial features relative to the almond shaped eyes and well defined nose. The wide mouth appears to exhibit this change as well, as does the dual lobbed head which is an anthropomorphic animal feature which is attributed to an animal such as a monkey. This piece is also an excellent example of a ceramic from the Vicus culture of ancient Peru, due to the reasons noted above, and most pieces from this culture seem to exhibit some form of "transformation" from one degree to another. This piece is also "thick walled", and has some weight to the piece. The early Peruvian ceramics from this culture were also fired at about 400 degrees C, thus producing a "thick walled" ceramic, as opposed to the subsequent Peruvian cultures such as the Moche, which produced "thin walled" ceramics which were fired at about 1000 degrees C. This piece is also analogous to an example seen in "Arts Ancient du Perou" by Bernard Villaret, Times Editions Pub., 1978, p. 51. (See attached photo.) This piece has some weight, as one handles this piece, and is in scarce mint condition with a vibrant deep reddish-brown glaze. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 119, Zurich, 1987. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 11/23/1984, no. 584912. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that is Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price on Request
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, accession no. N-110. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1239297
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Chavin "stirrup handle" ceramic that dates to the Early Horizon period, circa 700-400 B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7 inches long. This interesting piece is a standing animal, which represents a Coatimundi, or possibly a fox, as the lively head of this standing animal has an elongated nose and peaked ears. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is an orange and light red color. This esoteric piece is in overall superb condition, has some spotty black dotted mineral deposits, and some normal stirrup handle surface roughness. This piece has four large circle designs, and some geometric line design seen on each side, at the front, and on the face of this animated creature. The rectangular shaped head has dotted eyes, and is seen slightly tilted to the right, which give this piece a high degree of eye appeal and a very animated look. The mouth also appears to be slightly turned as well, and this movement noted with the head and mouth may represent this piece as a "transformation type" vessel. This type of artistic style, as noted above, is also attributed to the Chavin type ceramics known as "Tembladera style". This remarkable piece was produced at a very early period, regarding Pre-Columbian Andean cultures, and has a rare design with the esoteric curved hind quarter of the piece. This type of esoteric design is also rare regarding Chavin type ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. A piece with analogous artistic style was offered in Bonham's Pre-Columbian Art, San Francisco, CA., Dec. 2006, no. 5352. (This stirrup vessel type piece has analogous line design, color, and nose design, and depicts a humanoid figure.) Another analogous stirrup type ceramic vessel was offered in Christie's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 41. (This vessel depicts a jaguar with a slightly tilted head, peaked ears, and dotted eyes. The head is also a triangular designed head with an elongated snout, and this head is also turned to the right. This piece is classified as "Tembladera", circa 700-400 B.C. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $4,800.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an esoteric design that is seldom seen on the market, and it is extremely rare in it's intact condition. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1161912
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb piece is an Aztec red and black goblet that dates circa 1400-1525 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7.25 inches high, and has a two tone thick polychrome glossy glaze. This piece stands on a high red foot, and has an inverted bell shaped cup that has a wide black band. Another red band is seen below the upper lip and extends down inside the cup from the rim about .5 inches. This vibrant colored polychrome glaze, seen around the rim and extending down inside the cup, allowed one to drink from a smooth surface and is another indication that this piece was made for an important individual. This piece has vibrant colors, and has scattered minute black mineral deposits. This intact piece is in superb condition, has no repair and/or over paint, and has an exceptional thick glossy polychrome. The Aztec red and black polychrome ceramics are all rare to scarce, and are all finely made pieces with vibrant colors. These red and black ceramics obviously appealed to the Aztec sense of artistic taste and style. On the bottom rim, there is a painted number, 8928, which is from the Stendahl Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: San Diego, CA. estate collection, circa 1950's-1960's. Ex: Stendahl Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. (Inventory #8928.), circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1184568
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,685.00
This superb vessel is a Moche fineline ceramic that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This vibrant piece is approximately 12.2 inches high by 6.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with bright dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, some minute spotty light brown mineral deposits, and there is a small probe hole seen near the base on one side which is commonly seen on many authentic Moche ceramics. This piece also has a flat bottom and two lively running serpent warriors facing left, which are carrying shields/maces in an extended arm, and are seen with a bended extended leg. The fineline painting, along with the wave motifs seen on the raised stirrup, are painted in a vibrant dark red slip. This piece is one of only a few recorded examples that was likely painted by the same hand of a singular master painter, and is very analogous to the example seen in the Sackler collection. (See "Art of the Andes: Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections", Arthur M. Sackler Foundation Pub., Washington, D.C., p. 181, no. 58. See attached photo.) These serpent warrior examples are also thought to have been found in one geographic location, i.e Chimbote in the Santa Valley, and this theory also supports the premise that this piece was painted by an individual master painter. (This theory is also mentioned by Paul Clifford in the Sackler reference noted above.) The Sackler example and the superb example offered here, both show a coiled serpent body which conveys movement, a lively open mouth, dotted eye, and dark red trefoil body spots. This serpent warrior anthropomorphic composition conveys not only movement, but also a lively expression, which in combination makes this piece a master Moche composition. The anthropomorphic running serpent warriors composition also is a representation seen within the Moche spirit world, and may represnt the resurrection of a Moche warrior. This piece is a rare to scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 3821027., dated Nov. 27th, 1982.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1236064
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This lively piece is a black ware Chimu ceramic that dates circa 900-1470 A.D. This piece is approximately 8.8 inches high, and is intact in superb to mint condition. This piece has an even deep black glaze, and has some white calcite deposits which are heavier in the low relief sections of the conical base. The conical base has three registers, which have impressed triangle and square designs, and the square boxes have "step-pyramid" designs seen within. The head of this duck also has a very lively designed eye, and there are two molded legs seen below as well. The designs seen on the conical base are also artistic hallmarks of the Chimu culture, and these designs and type of conical base are typical Chimu attributes. This piece is an exceptional example of Chimu blackware, and is an excellent animal type Chimu ceramic. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note additional documentation is available to the buyer.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1178207
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This piece is a Moche ceramic stirrup-jar that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This interesting piece is approximately 9.75 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and has some light brown burnishing. This piece has light orange/red highlights over a cream colored background, and is a very detailed Moche fineline ceramic. This lively piece shows two detailed and animated "Strombus Monsters", which are seen facing right and are seen on each side of the vessel. These composite creatures are seen wearing a conch shell, from which they are seen emerging, and they display a lively open mouthed pose. These creatures have a striped pelage, a tapering tail, a long-spined main that runs down the length of it's back, and four legs with claws. There are also three eyes that extend from the front of the head. According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.63: "On the snout of the monster are antenna-like objects clearly derived from the land snail. There is a likely explanation for the combination of features on this animal. Since conch shells (Strombus galeatus) were imported from Ecuador, the Moche people probably never saw the creature living inside. They may, however, have made an analogy between the creature they thought inhabited the conch shell and the land snail, which is native to the north coast of Peru." There is an analogous comparable to this vessel that is seen in Sotheby's New York, Arts of Africa, Oceania & the Americas, May 2003, no. 207. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1978-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL document from Gutachten Lab., no. 7579125, dated 11/19/1979.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #809739
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb ceramic is from the Moche culture that dwelled in northern Peru and dates circa 50-200 A.D. This piece is classified as being Moche I period, circa 50-200 A.D., due to the design of the stirrup spout that has a thick lip. The Moche ceramics from this period often have a cream colored glaze with red highlights, as this vessel also displays. This intact piece is approximately 8 inches high and is in superb condition, with no over paint, repair, and/or restoration. There is also a small pebble inside this ceramic, and this vessel may have served as a ceremonial rattle. This cute piece has a vibrant red line-designed lizard seen on both sides, and there are red dots that surround each lizard. These red dots represent seeds of the acacia tree, which are closely related to the hallucinogenic anadenanthera colubrina, which are believed to have powerful medicinal properties. The lizards that are native to the desert scrub brush land of northern Peru subsist exclusively on these seeds, and its thought the Moche consumed these lizards believing that they would derive the benefits of the acacia seeds. (For the ceramic type see "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, 1978, page 142.) The lizard was also a creature worthy of depiction, as lizards shed their skins, and this trait makes them symbolic of regeneration. This piece is an interesting work of Moche line-designed art that is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private CA. collection. Ex: Arte Textil, San Francisco, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Walter Knox collection, Phoenix, AZ., Ex: Private CO. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: