Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1031929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek pyxis vessel that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and is a classic ancient Greek Hellenistic form. This piece is approximately 6.2 inches high by 4.25 inches in diameter, and is made of two sections, with a top section that sits on top of the bottom half. The walls of this intact ceramic are very thin, as the piece was fired at a high temperature. Consequently, this ceramic is very durable and the thin walls are very strong, and this suits this piece very well as it was designed to hold precious cosmetics and/or items such as jewelry. This piece was likely used by a woman of some means as it was an expensive piece in antiquity, and it may have also been used as a votive grave offering in order to be used in the afterlife as well. This piece is analogous to many "Attic" type examples, and is known as a "West Slope" type, as this type of ceramic was found on the west side of the Parthenon in Athens. This type of pyxis can also be seen in several Greek museums, including the Pella Museum in Greece. The piece offered here has a very attractive yellow ivy leaf and white berry band, which is a hallmark design of the Athenian ceramic industry, and many of these pieces were made for export. There are also two white decorative circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and a mold pressed roundel medallion that is seen at the top center of the upper lid section. Within this mold pressed medallion, are two standing figures of two lovers embracing, and a standing figure of Eros looking on. (A similar scene is seen on a Canosan terracotta pyxis, circa 3rd century B.C., which is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1987, no.276. See attached photo.) This intact piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in mint "as found" condition. This vessel also has very vibrant colors, has great eye appeal, and is a scarce to rare example. Ex: Ulla Lindner collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1307402
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large Mayan poison bottle dates to the Late Classic Period, circa 550-800 A.D., and is approximately 3.75 inches high, by 3.45 inches wide, by 1.5 inches thick. This mold made piece has a mirror image on each side that was pressed into the clay with a stamp. The image seen here is an audience scene between the Mayan God K, seen seated on the left, who is conferring with the seated Mayan God L that is seen to the right. Seen between them is a glyph band that is comprised of seven individual glyphs. Both of the Mayan gods seen here are also clad in intricate regalia and jade jewelry. God K also has an elongated snout and a smoke scroll that is emerging from his forehead, and God L, one of the lords of "Xibalba", who has an old man's wrinkled face, is seen wearing a distinctive "Moan Bird" headdress with upturned feathers. The Mayan "Moan Bird" was named "Oxlahun-Chaan" or "13-Sky", and he is the Mayan personification of the "Katun" and of the "sky". This piece also has mirror image double glyph bands seen on each side of the vessel. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb to mint condition. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive light brown burnishing. There are also traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas on the outer surface, and this piece probably held powdered incense, or colored pigments, or red cinnabar that was sacred to the Maya. Red cinnabar was also widely traded within the Mayan world, and it was this type of vessel that was used to facilitate this trade. Red cinnabar has preservation properties, as it was mercury based, and this is why this type of Mayan bottle is often referred to as a "Poison Bottle". The Mayan elite also lined their tombs with this material, and in addition, traces of this material are often found on Mayan ceramics, as the Mayan tombs and ceramics were given "eternal life" with this type of material. This piece is a superb example, not only for it's condition, but also because the mold made and stamped images are very clear. This piece is also safe to handle, as the red cinnabar is deeply embedded into the clay and there are only trace amounts. An analogous example with the same stamped design and condition was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1996, no. 344. (The Sotheby's example has the normal size that is approximately 3 inches high. $1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,070.00 realized.) Ex: New York collection, circa 1990. Ex: Ron Messick Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, circa 1990's. Ex: Spendors of the World Gallery, Haiku, HI. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1311165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This cute piece is a Roman bronze seated Silenus that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, and is a complete intact piece that has no repair/restoration. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and was cast as one piece. This piece shows a nude drunken and drinking Silenus seated on a rock, and he is holding a kantharos in his left hand, and his right hand is raised with an open palm and raised thumb. This pose with the open palm is also thought to have been a popular gesture used by actors in the Greek and Roman theater. (For a description of these various theatrical poses and gestures see: "The History of the Greek and Roman Theater", by Margarete Bieber, Princeton University Press, 1939.) The Silenus seen here has the typical bald head, pot belly, short legs, and had human and horse attributes. The eyes and facial features are very well detailed, and this piece is a nice example of this mythical creature who was the companion and tutor of Dionysus. This piece also has a round insert below the piece, and this is an indication that this piece may have been part of a group bronze sculpture made from several figurines. This piece also has a small flat section on top of the head, and this may have been designed to support another object and/or figurine as well. A nice Roman bronze with a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa late 1990's. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This piece can also be mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece today. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #680621
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete piece is a Greek standing terracotta figure of a votaress. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high and dates circa 5th century BC. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration. There are some light brown earthen deposits that are adhered to the surface, and this is an indication that this piece has not been over cleaned, and as such, the surface of this piece is superb quality with little wear. This piece was mold made and was designed with a trapezoidal base. This votaress may represent the Greek goddess Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton and a himation that is seen draped over her shoulders. She has a slight smile and is seen holding a piglet against her breasts with both hands, and this piglet is probably a votive offering. (See Sotheby's Antiquities New York, June 2004, no. 33 and Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2000, no. 84, for other analogous examples. The two pieces cited here are approximately 10.5 inches and 8.25 inches high.) These terracotta figurines are thought to be votive in nature, and represented the offering that is seen within the piece itself, and consequently, this piece was intended as a substitute for the actual offering. This piece is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom wooden base. Ex: German private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1215119
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Mayan terracotta that dates from the Late Classic period, circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 6 inches high by 7.5 inches wide by 4.5 inches deep. This piece has powerful eye appeal, as it shows the Mexican rain god Tlaloc with large round eyes, scrolled upper lip, and exposed tooth row. This piece is a very large applique that was part of a extremely large vessel which may have had several of these applied appliques that ran around the outside of the vessel. There is original white pigment seen over the exposed teeth and round eyes, root marking seen in sections of the piece, and there are light brown and gray earthen deposits seen over the entire piece. The condition of this piece is intact, with little apparent crack fill, and this piece appears to have broken cleanly away from the main body of the vessel. A wall section of this large vessel also forms the backside of the piece offered here. The mix of Mexican and Mayan motifs in the Late Classic period is not uncommon, and another example of a Mayan terracotta with the Mexican rain god Tlaloc can be seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The Saint Louis Art Museum Collections" by Lee Parsons, New York, 1980, no. 318, p. 205. The Mexican rain god Tlaloc has also appeared since the Early Classic period in the Maya zone, and is often related to scenes of "autosacrifice" involving the nobility, in which they self extract and offer their own blood. This "blood letting ceremony", as an offering to the gods, is also a metaphor for rain, although the Maya had their own rain deity, Chaac. The piece offered here may also have been part of a large ceremonial blood letting vessel. In relation to the letting of blood, the Tlaloc deity also appears on war shields, as seen on Mayan terracotta figures. This piece is scarce to rare, and sits on a custom black metal stand. Ex: E. Duncan collection, Stilwell, Kansas, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,800.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very think on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Mathias Komor collection, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1261165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is an Olmec stone celt/ax that dates circa 1200-550 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.4 inches high by 3.5 inches wide. This intact piece has beautiful dark-green, blue, and white colors, some dark brown mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the piece, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits that are seen on all of the outer surfaces. This trapezoidal shaped piece has a nice semi-sharp blade, seen at the top of the piece, and the bottom tip of the bottom base is unfinished, as this is the original outer edge of the stone from which this piece was formed. This piece also has an esoteric slight bend that runs through the length of the main body, and perhaps this was done to make this piece resemble an ear of corn that is seen peeling away from the central cob. The Olmec were also known to have this type of piece worn on a belt, and the wearer doubled as the Olmec "Maize God", who was meant to represent the central cob of a maize ear. According to Karl Taube in "Olmec Art at Dumbarton Oaks, Library of Congress Pub., 2004, p. 129: "But, for the Middle Formative Olmec, the key plant was maize, the ear of which, in its very form, resembles a green stone celt. With their broad, curving bits and narrow polls, the outlines of Olmec celts are so similar to Olmec representations of maize that it is frequently difficult to distinguish them. Moreover, much as maize seed is prepared on the stone metate, celts and other jade artifacts were surely ground and polished on flat stone surfaces. Through the process of grinding, both maize food and finished jade are created." This type of piece was valued by the Olmec for its beautiful color, as this piece was very labor extensive to produce, and this intensive grinding and polishing resulted in a highly glossy surface which still can be seen with this piece today. This type of piece was also traded widely by the Olmec, and may also have represented a set value of wealth. This attractive piece also comes with a custom black metal stand, and simply slides down into the stand. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1267183
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates to the Classical Period, circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches in diameter, by 1.6 inches high. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and has an exceptional gold "river patina" with some spotty dark red and brown mineral deposits. The rare gold "river patina" sometimes occurs on ancient Greek bronzes of this type, due to the metal of this piece having a high tin content, and the highly mineralized soil conditions from which this piece was buried. This piece was also hand beaten from a single sheet of bronze, and there is some weight to this piece as this piece is thick walled. In the inside center of this piece, there is a raised circular roundel known as an "omphalos", which in the ancient Greek mind represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks regarded the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. Delphi enshrined the sacred half-egg stone, which was also known as the "omphalos", and "omphalos" in Greek means "navel". The "omphalos" seen on the piece offered here is raised very high within the vessel, and also served as a finger grip on the bottom outer side, as this piece was made without any handles. This type of vessel is also known as a "libation vessel", and it is ceremonial in nature, as it was used at temple and/or funeral ceremonies. This type of vessel with it's flat bottom, and central "omphalos", was used for pouring and/or offering libations. The design elements of this type of vessel, along with the sacred symbols built into the piece, made this type of vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and was often made as a temple or grave offering. (For this type of vessel, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Co. Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp. 74-83.) The bronze piece offered here is much better than most examples, and has an exceptional patina that is seldom seen on the market. A custom Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000040. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1208989
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern bronze roundel, that dates circa 1000-650 B.C. This rare piece is approximately 2.5 inches in diameter, and it has a concave design. This piece was likely attached to a cloth backing such as a garment, as there are some minute attachment holes seen on the outer flat perimeter band. Its quite possible that this piece could have made up a armored object such as a cuirass, a belt, or a quilted protective garment with several of these attached roundels. The concave design, with a protective inner core of leather or wood, would have offered some added strength. The flat outer perimeter band also has a detailed dotted pattern that runs around the piece, and another larger dotted pattern is seen just inside on the inner concave section of this piece. Centered in the middle of this concave section is a cat-like design which likely represents a lion or lioness, as it has a small upturned tail, paws, and feline ears, nose, and eyes. The design of the head is very interesting, as there is an insect design seen within the head of this animal. This insect resembles a bee or an ant, as seen from the perspective of a top view and looking down. This piece may be from the Luristan, Urartian, or Marlik cultures, as the fabric and artistic style of this piece is analogous to other bronze pieces from those cultures. However, the duality of design is not often seen relative to the cultures noted above, and this piece is rare to extremely rare. This piece likely was used as a "protector type" piece, given the symbols seen on this piece, and this also makes perfect sense as a work of arms. The dark green patina of this piece is exceptional, and there is some attractive spotty light brown and reds seen within this piece. This piece has some minor losses seen on the upper outer edge which does not detract from this attractive piece, and this piece has a great deal of eye appeal. This pieces comes with a custom wooden and clear Plexiglas stand, and simply slips down into the stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #968903
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This charming piece is a black steatite spindal whorl that was used for weaving textiles. This pieces dates circa 3100-2600 B.C. and is likely Anatolian or Syrian, as the four figures seen on this piece are analogous to the figures seen on carved cylinder seals for the period and region. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, London, "Western Asiatic Cylinder seals and Antiquities from the Erlenmeyer Collection, Part 1", July 1992, no. 31-33.) Black steatite is very difficult to carve, as it is a very hard stone, and this adds to the rarity of this piece. In addition, this type of stone comes mostly from the Syrian region, and cylinder seals, rather than spindle whorls, are much more common. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, by .5 inches high. This piece is conical in shape, has a hole bow drilled through the center, and has four separate registers with a figure within. Two of the figures seen in profile may be images of a deer, and a dog or a wolf. The other two images may be seen from the top, and may represent the same animals, but if seen in profile, they are very anthropomorphic, and its also possible that both views were meant to be portrayed. This piece has very minute root marking and striations that are seen on the entire piece which is a good sign of authenticity, in addition, there are mineral deposits seen in many of the low relief points. This piece is scarce to rare, and is in superb condition for the type. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1044364
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This visually appealing piece is a large Mayan cylinder vessel that dates circa 400-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 6.9 inches in diameter, is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and sits on four legs that are attached to the bottom base. This piece is a bright orange and black-line polychrome ceramic, which has a "square-cubed" geometric pattern that runs around the entire outer surface. This pattern is likely an imitation of a basket weave pattern, or possibly a textile pattern. Mayan artists also relished imitation of one material with another, particularly in painted media that we read as "trompe l' oeil", in which the eye is tricked, and in the case of the piece offered here, the surface was painted in such a way as to make the observer see woven basketry. In addition, and according to Herbert J. Spinden in "A Study of Mayan Art, Its Subject Matter & Historical Development", Dover Pub., New York, 1975, page 147: "Simple basket weavings appear as painted ornamentation on potsherds from the Uloa Valley (Fig. 204). Complicated braided patterns are common as the rim decoration on pottery from this region, and may have had their origin in the imitation of wicker-work basketry. It is probable that basketry was not of much importance as an art among the Maya, owing to the high development of ceramics." This piece has some heavy spotty black manganese deposits and root marking, which is mainly seen on the bottom and at the bottom edge of the vessel. This piece has some minor minute glaze loss, but overall, it is in extremely fine condition. This piece is also from the Salvador/Honduran region, as the orange and black colors are common for the region, but the type of geometric "square-cubed" pattern that is seen running around the entire vessel is not common, and is a scarce design. This large piece is interesting, has a high degree of eye appeal, and is scarce in this condition with its vibrant color. Ex: C.W. Slagle collection, Scottsdale, AZ., circa 1980's. Ex: Private FL. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,685.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: