Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1195601
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This coin is a Greek Gold Stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C. This coin is in EF (extremely fine) condition, and is 8.6 gms. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a Macedonian general of Alexander the Great. After Alexander the Great's return from Egypt in 331 B.C., Philoxenos was appointed to superintend the collection of the tribute in the provinces north of the Taurus Mountains. In the subsequent distribution of the provinces after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C., Philoxenus was appointed by Perdiccas to succeed Philotas in the government of Cilicia circa 321 B.C. In that same year in the partition of Triparadisus after the fall of Perdiccas, he was allowed to retain his satrapy of Cilicia, and this likely was the period that the coin offered here was minted. The obverse of this beautiful coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right, wearing a crested helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also coiled locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse has a finely detailed and exceptional standing figure of Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen on this coin is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, and one can even see minute facial details that are not normally seen on a coin of this type. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. Another example of this type of the same grade was recently offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047, $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized. Price 2078. SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1147979
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare to scarce piece is an Attic Greek beaker/mug that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-725 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, and is slightly larger than most recorded examples. This piece is also intact and has no repair/restoration, no overpaint, and no stress cracks that run within the vessel. The handle is completely intact, and this is rare for an early Attic Greek vessel of this type, as most examples have damage and/or repair to the handle or the area where the raised handle attaches to the body. This piece is also in its "as found" condition, with some very slight wear to one side, and there are spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel which also mask some of the dark brown line design. This piece has dark brown cross hatched designs, with dots below, that run around the center of the vessel, and singular line design that runs up the length of the handle. This vessel is a light tan terracotta, and has a flat bottom with a slightly flared lip. This piece was also likely produced in Athens for the export market. This piece is very analogous in shape and size to the Heidi Vollmoeller Collection piece that was offered by Christie's Antiquities, South Kensington, London, Oct. 2003, lot no. 519. (See attachment.) There have been very few of these Attic Greek Geometric Period pieces on the market, and they are rare to scarce, especially in this intact condition. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1231949
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian blown and molded bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high by 3.7 inches in diameter, and is an exceptional example for the type. This exceptional mint quality piece also has one of the best "as found" patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has attractive thick encrusted spotty dark brown and muti-colored iridescent mineral deposits, which is seen over a pale green glass. This thick-walled piece has an even smooth surface, and pieces of this type were also cut with diamond and/or round pattern registers. This piece was skillfully blown into a mold, and this also explains why the side wall of this beautiful vessel has a uniform shape and has a gradual rounded surface. The mold was then removed, and the piece was then removed from the attached metal rod at the base after it cooled. A "tang" or "pontil" mark can still be seen on the outer bottom base of the piece. A much higher skill was required to form a vessel of this type, relative to the more common and numerous Roman "free blown" examples which were not mold made. An analogous Sasanian bowl of this type with cut registers is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New York, 1977, p. 159, no. 82.). This piece is one of the finest example's of it's type, as it has a natural and beautiful patina in it's scarce "as found" mint condition. Ex: Manhattan Galleries, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #701988
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads and a complete celt god pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the celt god pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inch wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D. and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and the pendant were bow-drilled, with a hole created from each end. The pendant shows line cut design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. These pendants had magical properties and were worn as personal adornments which conveyed the status and rank of the owner. The ax god jade pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many Pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Precolumbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993. This piece can be worn as is, but probably needs to be restrung. Ex: F. Hirsch collection, Germany. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1239297
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Chavin "stirrup handle" ceramic that dates to the Early Horizon period, circa 700-400 B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7 inches long. This interesting piece is a standing animal, which represents a Coatimundi, or possibly a fox, as the lively head of this standing animal has an elongated nose and peaked ears. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is an orange and light red color. This esoteric piece is in overall superb condition, has some spotty black dotted mineral deposits, and some normal stirrup handle surface roughness. This piece has four large circle designs, and some geometric line design seen on each side, at the front, and on the face of this animated creature. The rectangular shaped head has dotted eyes, and is seen slightly tilted to the right, which give this piece a high degree of eye appeal and a very animated look. The mouth also appears to be slightly turned as well, and this movement noted with the head and mouth may represent this piece as a "transformation type" vessel. This type of artistic style, as noted above, is also attributed to the Chavin type ceramics known as "Tembladera style". This remarkable piece was produced at a very early period, regarding Pre-Columbian Andean cultures, and has a rare design with the esoteric curved hind quarter of the piece. This type of esoteric design is also rare regarding Chavin type ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. A piece with analogous artistic style was offered in Bonham's Pre-Columbian Art, San Francisco, CA., Dec. 2006, no. 5352. (This stirrup vessel type piece has analogous line design, color, and nose design, and depicts a humanoid figure.) Another analogous stirrup type ceramic vessel was offered in Christie's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 41. (This vessel depicts a jaguar with a slightly tilted head, peaked ears, and dotted eyes. The head is also a triangular designed head with an elongated snout, and this head is also turned to the right. This piece is classified as "Tembladera", circa 700-400 B.C. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $4,800.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an esoteric design that is seldom seen on the market, and it is extremely rare in it's intact condition. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #680621
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete piece is a Greek standing terracotta figure of a votaress. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high and dates circa 5th century BC. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration. There are some light brown earthen deposits that are adhered to the surface, and this is an indication that this piece has not been over cleaned, and as such, the surface of this piece is superb quality with little wear. This piece was mold made and was designed with a trapezoidal base. This votaress may represent the Greek goddess Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton and a himation that is seen draped over her shoulders. She has a slight smile and is seen holding a piglet against her breasts with both hands, and this piglet is probably a votive offering. (See Sotheby's Antiquities New York, June 2004, no. 33 and Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2000, no. 84, for other analogous examples. The two pieces cited here are approximately 10.5 inches and 8.25 inches high.) These terracotta figurines are thought to be votive in nature, and represented the offering that is seen within the piece itself, and consequently, this piece was intended as a substitute for the actual offering. This piece is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom wooden base. Ex: German private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1266269
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Roman marble fragment that dates from the Roman Imperial Period, circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.2 inches high by 8.25 inches long. This piece is likely a fragment from a marble table top which had a framing border, and this fragment is a section of this framing border. The top of this piece has a flat, but concave edge, and this formed the outer edge of the marble table top. The back side is flat, and the top side of this fragment (table top edge section) has a width of approximately 1.6 inches. This piece has a nice spotty light brown patina, and is in superb condition with very little wear. The scene depicted on this piece is interesting, in that it is a gladiatorial scene of a semi-nude pygmy with a spear fighting a leaping panther. This type of pygmy gladiator was known as a "Venator", who fought and/or hunted animals in the arena, and this type of spectacle was known as a "Venatio" or "hunt". The spear used by the "Venatores" for fighting with animals was also known as a "Venabulum". (See "Gladiator, Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Random House, 2009.) The pygmy appears to be wearing a wide strap around his neck and chest that may have been used to help support the weight of the large spear. This long spear would have been an advantage for the pygmy, as it would have provided separation between himself and the panther, but it was also a disadvantage, especially if the quick panther got past the blade tip of the unwieldy spear. The two figures seen on this scarce gladiatorial scene, may also be depicted close to scale with one another, and the panther appears that it could have stood as high as the height of the pygmy. The scene depicted, of a pygmy vs. panther, is a relatively scarce to rare scene of the gladiatorial games, as most of the gladiatorial scenes depicted on Roman art portray full sized and armed gladiators. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and this type of scene is seldom seen on the market. This piece is mounted on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This complete piece is an attractive silver hairpin that dates circa late 16th Century ( circa 1560-1590 A.D.). This piece is Ottoman Empire and was likely made in Constantinople, otherwise known as Byzantium. The Byzantine Empire derived it's name from this city, and the floral pattern seen at the terminal end of this piece, is a design pattern that is a Byzantine type as well. The Ottomans adopted this pattern, and is often seen on Ottoman polychrome Iznik tiles from the 16th Century. This piece was worn in the hair and has a loop at the top so that it tied to the body. This piece can easily be worn today in the hair or garmet. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, 17.5 grams, and is about 97% pure silver. Interestingly, the weight of this piece is also analogous to the ancient Greek "Attic-Greco Weight Standard" of 17.5 grams for a silver tetradrachm. This piece has some minor wear seen at the top that indicates long use, and this piece can be worn today. A custom stand is included and the piece can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #685120
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long by 2.25 inches high. This piece is solid and was cast as one complete piece. This scarce piece is probably Greek, as examples of this type have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. These pieces were votive in nature and this is why they have been found at these sacred Greek sites. (See H.V. Herrmann, Die Kessel der Orientalalisierenden Zeit, Teil I, OlympForsch VI, 1966, no.114. for an analogous example that was found at Olympia.) This piece has a round almond eye and the tail is designed between the hind legs, and these are features that are seen in Greek art during the early Geometric period, circa 8th century B.C. Pieces of this type have been found in Anatolia and northern Syria, and have been found in many locations in the ancient Greek world. This is why pieces of this type are classified as being "Anatolian" and/or "Northern Syrian", but it probably is the case that many of these pieces may also have been made in Greece, and one probable site is Olympia. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was extensive trade between Greece and the the Levant (eastern Mediterranean). This piece has a dark green and brown patina with dark green mineral deposits. The design of this piece is also very analogous to another example that is seen in the Munich Glyptothek Museum (See attached photo.) The piece offered here, and the Glyptothek Museum example, are both approximately the same size as well, and both have short cropped horns, incised line design on the flat forehead, and a round almond eye. The bull also appears to be pulling back with the weight of his body, as a domesticated animal would do, and this may also explain the cropped horn design of this piece. This type of a solid cast bronze votive bull is scarce, and is not often seen on the market. This piece is also from a private Swiss collection. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich. Published:"More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection" by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no.17. Ex: Christie,s Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no.372.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594176
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This Chavin/Cupisnique water carrier is an early type Chavin ceramic and dates circa 900-600 B.C. This piece is intact and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or breaks. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and has a cream and light red polychrome glaze. There is some light brown burnishing seen mostly on the bottom, and there is also a very small drill hole that is seen that was done for a thermoluminescence test (TL test). This TL test was done by the prior private collector in Germany, and it was done by Kotalla Laboratory. This document is included with this piece.(The results of this test place this piece circa 600-400 B.C.) This cute piece has a friendly warm smile and projects an easy going carefree feeling. The design of the face is very simple, and comic-like, but this was probably the intent of the potter/artist. This type of piece is rare for an Andean ceramic, as most Andean cultures such as the Chavin and the Moche were based on a warrior cult that used live captives for sacrifice. The Chavin/Cupisnique produced some of the first and finest ceramics in ancient Peru, and the stirrup-spout seen on this vessel was their invention. This allowed the Chavin/Cupisnique potters to move this piece around in the kiln with a stick, and they were able to produce pieces that had bright colors with even glazes such as this piece. This water carrier may be a representation of a person, but more likely, it is an anthropomorphic form represented as being from the spirit world. There is also a face seen at the front of the main body of the vessel that may double as a clothing design. This piece may also be from the "Cupisnique" culture as noted by Richard Berger in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", page 90-99. He notes that this type of ceramic, with it's trapezoidal arch and single spout with the flaring end, are creations of the initial phase prior to the appearance of what we know as true Chavin style ceramics. The TL test seems to support this view. Most early pieces of this type have simple line design details for the eyes, nose, and other facial features/body design as this piece shows. This Chavin/Cupisnique piece is a rare, early type and is a large example. Ex: Private German collection. Ex; Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278504
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare piece is a Roman iron javelin head that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, and is a complete example. This piece has a barbed "spiked tang" head at the end, and a rounded lead weight attached to the shaft about 3.5 inches from the end of this formable weapon. This piece has an exceptional dark brown patina, is in superb condition, and is preserved with a wax sealant which has preserved the iron shaft. There are also some spotty dark brown and white calcite mineral deposits seen mostly on the lead weight. This weapon was also known as a "hasta plumbata", meaning "leaded spear", or as referred to by the ancient source Vegetius, as a "martiobarbalus", meaning "Mars-barb". (See Vegetius, "Epitoma Rei Militaris", translated by N.P. Milner, Liverpool University Press, 1993.) Another ancient source, the "De Rebus Bellicus", M.W.C. Hassall and R.T. Ireland (eds), 1979, Oxford, describes the "plumbata Mamillata", meaning "breasted javelin", as a javelin with a lead weight and a pointed iron head, with flights attached to the opposite end of the shaft. The epithet 'breasted' likely refers to the bulbous lead weight. This lead weight was also molded onto and around the iron shaft, and was solidly attached to the shaft. This type of weapon is rare, as only a few examples have been recovered from the British Isles, notably Wroxeter; and even fewer examples have been found in Germany, notably Augst and Castell Weissenberg, and Lorch, Austria. However, the ancient source Vegetius, (1.17), does state that two Illyrican legions were renamed "Martiobarbuli Ioviani" and "Martiobarbuli Herculiani" by the joint emperors Diocletian and Maximianus because of their proficiency with this weapon. He further states that five "plumbatae" were carried by a soldier in the concavity of his shield, and they were thrown at first charge, or used to defend with the reserves and could penetrate the body or foot of the assailant. This weapon was also thought to easily penetrate shields because of the lead weight, and could be thrown at great distance. Vegetius, (1.17), further states that soldiers using the "plumbata" take the place of archers, "for they wound both the men and the horses of the enemy before they come within reach of the common missle weapons". This weapon was truly an innovation in Roman battle tactics, and is a weapon that is seldom seen on the market today, as it was made from iron which easily deteriorates in mineralized soils. Another rare piece of this type is seen in "The Late Roman Army" by Pat Southern and Karen Dixon, Yale University Press, 1996, p. 114, Fig. 46. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1108747
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare piece is a Roman marbled glass flask that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition. This piece is a dark green/blue color, has some heavy white calcite deposits on the upper inner surfaces, and some spotty black mineral deposits on the outer surface. This exceptional piece was produced by blending glass rods into the piece, and this process created the "marbled" composition of the vessel which is a heavy, thick-walled vessel. This process also produced a rough surface, and there are also small and large air bubbles that were fused into the glass. This piece was also difficult to produce, and is much rarer than the subsequent Roman blown glass vessels that were thin-walled and mass produced. This piece also has a flattened bottom and easily stands by itself. For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 90. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $6,875.00 realized.) Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,465.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art, Dec. 2004, no. 148. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: