Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1326070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This nice Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, by 5.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This rare piece has a dark gray patina with dark brown highlights, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from five separate parts: the main hand beaten body of the piece, two cast handles, a ring base, and a round base tubular extension. The main body of the piece also has an attractive "volute fluted" pattern that runs around the main body of the vessel, and several hand punched dots that are seen running around the base of the rim. This superb piece is intact, and has some limited repair, with only the secure reattachment of the handles and footed base which appears to have been done some time ago. There are three short and visual stress cracks that are seen running down from the upper rim into the main body of the piece that are about .3 inches, but other than that, this piece is a superb example that is intact, and is a solid example. These cracks were likely the result of ground pressure, and also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The overall design of this esoteric Greek vessel is rare, especially with the volute pattern and the "flat handles" that are normally seen on subsequent Roman period vessels. A silver vessel kantharos cup seen in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", by D.E. Strong, London, 1966, p. 114, dating from the second century B.C., has analogous "flat handles" as the vessel offered here, and is described as having two "long horizontal thumb grips". This piece featured by D.E. Strong is now seen in the National Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and is also described as being a "Greek vessel with elaborate ornament". The Greek vessel offered here may also be among the first vessels of this type with a "flat handle" design, and was the Greek prototype for the subsequent Roman period silver kantharos type cups that had this analogous "flat handle" design. The piece offered here not only is a rare example that has an esoteric design, but it also has superb eye appeal and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315774
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This lustrous piece is a Greek Attic skyphos cup that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a rich even black lustrous surface that is seen both on the outer and inner surfaces. In addition, the black glaze is complete on the inner surface which also points to the fine workmanship of this vessel. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits, and some minute root marking seen in sections of this piece. The lustrous black glazed surface also has a multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a flat base, and two attached strap handles. This piece is an exceptional example, is in mint to superb condition, and is better than most examples of the type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1370697
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This mint quality Greek Illyrian helmet dates circa 6th century B.C., and is approximately 12 inches high, from the top of the crest box to the tip of the cheek pieces, and it is a full size example. This beautiful piece has been classified in "Antike Helm", Lipperheide and Antikenmuseums Collections, Mainz, Germany, 1988, pp. 59-64, as being "Type II, Var.B". This piece is in flawless, mint condition, and has no repair/restoration, and is one of the best examples on the global market. This piece has slightly elongated cheek pieces, a detailed punched decorative dotted band that runs around the outer perimeter edge, and a well-defined crest box. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze, and the crest box was added into the construction of the helmet, not only to define an attachment area for the crest which was likely made from bird quills, but also to give extra strength to the main body of the piece. The added crest box also was designed to protect the warrior from overhead blows. There is also a slightly extended neck guard which is finely made as well. This exceptional example also has some very minor horizontal scraps and nicks which is also an indication that this piece was in battle. This piece has a compact and attractive design, and is one of the top examples for the type. In addition, this piece has an exceptional dark green patina with dark blue highlights which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. The patina seen on this attractive piece is also in "as found" condition, and this helmet has not been over cleaned as most examples. This piece also comes with a custom metal display stand. Ex Axel Guttmann collection, Inventory no. 517, Berlin, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Dallas, Texas collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C., and is in nearly Extremely Fine to Very Fine condition (VF+/VF+). The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of a young Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus (VF+) grade. This piece is also perfect for a ring or a pendant. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1359591
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This exceptional piece is a Greek silver fibula that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2.2 inches long, by 1.6 inches wide. This piece also has a beautiful light gray patina, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This finely detailed piece is a solid example, and was made in sections, and was also designed with an acanthus design seen at one terminal end. The other terminal end has two raised knobs with a hoop between, and this raised hoop likely held a leather tie so that this fibula would not have been lost by the wearer. This piece was expensive in antiquity, and was worn only by a wealthy individual. This piece also displays five "paddle wheel" decorative elements, and each of these decorative elements have six raised knobs. The overall design of this attractive piece is very intricate, which also lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This type of piece was also used in place of a button to fasten the sleeves of the Greek chiton. (For the type and use see: "Greek Jewellery, 6,000 Years of Tradition", 1997, Athens, no. 78.) Another near identical example is also seen in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Inventory no. 52.36. The exceptional piece offered here is one of the finest recorded examples, and is complete, save for the missing ultra-thin attachment pin. This piece is also attached to a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288546
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Greek gold diadem wreath that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 13 inches long by 1.4 inches high, and is a complete example. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, and is 100% original. This piece has eight large leaves, with four on each side that meet at the front center of the piece. The eight leaves are each attached to a band with attachment tabs, and these tabs are punched through the band and are folded back on the back side of the piece. There are two hooks at each end, and they simply tied this piece together at the back of the head. The overall construction of this piece is rather simple, but this also provided for a piece that has a great deal of eye appeal, as the leaves are easily seen on the crown of the head. This piece was also likely made for a young woman or child, and could have been worn during special events or in the grave. This piece is also a type that first appeared in the Hellenistic Period, and was popular throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece has some strength, and stays in a fixed position on it's custom display stand. This piece can also easily be removed from it's custom display stand, and once removed, can also be displayed on it's own, as it solidly put together. This piece also has some light brown deposits, some minute black dotted mineral deposits seen in various sections, and some spotty minute root marking. The color of this piece also is a brilliant gold, and has a beautiful faint multi-colored iridescent patina. One of the best examples for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre 1492 item #1268018
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This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 310 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Kantharos Group, and is approximately 8.25 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen on the top of the lid, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. There is also a large female head seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with the top section of a white and red wing that is seen curling up at the front of her face. The female head is also seen wearing a detailed sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with dotted and cross patterns, and is also wearing an elaborate earring and dotted necklace. This figure likely represents a winged "Eros", and this portrait type is also known as a "lady of fashion", and is thought by many academics to also represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the ancient Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has highly decorative floral patterns that are seen on each side of the lady's portrait, and a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle. This piece is better than most examples of it's type, and another analogous example of this type of vessel of nearly the same size and condition was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is among one of the best examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: G. van Driesum collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374395
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This complete and intact piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Demeter that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, and is an intact and complete example that has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and was designed with a square base and a circular vent hole seen at the back. This nice piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece represents Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton, along with a himation that is draped over her shoulders. She is also seen holding a piglet to her chest with both hands, and is standing with her left knee slightly forward. She has a slight smile, and has a very serene overall look, as she is seen simply standing and facing the viewer. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and also depicts the animal offering (piglet) that was offered in a religious ceremony to a shrine or a temple. This piece by itself may also have served as a votive offering substitute as well. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2000. no. 84 for another analogous example of this type.) The piece offered here is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also attached to a custom wooden display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
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These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299213
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce Greek Attic "Black-Figure" kylix dates circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is approximately 9.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.7 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and is intact with no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is a "Type B" form, and has a wide and shallow draft for the inner bowl, two attached rounded and looping handles, and a slightly raised disk seen above the thick base disk. (For the "Type B" form, and the authoritative work on Attic Black-Figure painters, see J.D. Beazley, "Attic Black-Figure Vase Painters", Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1956.) There is also a solid black inner glaze, along with a dotted tondo seen within a tan reserve. The outer surface of this fine cup has two attractive large black palmettes, seen on each side, which alternate between three black floral patterns. There is also a solid lustrous black glaze seen below the palmettes, and this continues to the top of the base disk. Another analogous example of identical size and design was offered in Bonhams Antiquities, London, Oct. 1996, no. 14. (250-280 Pound estimates, 450 Pounds realized, approximately $910.00 US. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: