Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1304062
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This wonderful coin is a Roman silver serrate denarius, circa 79 B.C., Rome mint, and minted by C. Naevius Balbus, who was the mint master in Rome for the period. This coin is in FDC grade (mint state), is 3.78g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin has a serrated edge, and is known as a "Serrate Denarius", and the added edge work was done to insure that the mint was coining near pure silver. One could inspect this coin and see into the inner flan from the serrated edge, and know that the core of this coin was made from silver and was not plated. This type of coin briefly was the norm during the late Roman Republic period. This attractive coin features: Obv; The diademed bust of Venus facing right, with S.C behind, and Rev; A winged Victory driving a three-horse triga right, control number above, and the lettering C.NAE.BALB in the exergue below. This coin also has a beautiful light gray old cabinet patina, and fine detail can be seen with the horse reigns, minute dotted Victory wings, and the hair of Venus. C. Naevius Balbus, Rome's mint master for 79 B.C., was a supporter of Sulla and his use of Venus on the obverse of this coin, was due to the fact that Venus was the patron deity of Sulla; and the reverse type with the winged victory seen on this coin, also commemorates Sulla's victories against Mithridates VI of Pontus. The use of the three-horse triga on Roman Republican coinage is also rare - previously it occurred in 110 B.C. on the coinage of Appius Cladius, who was also consul in 79 B.C. when this coin was minted. The coin offered here is also one of the finest known examples for the type. Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 531. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little piece is an Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is superb to mint quality, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This superb to mint piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325568
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This powerful ancient coin was minted in ancient Lydia, and is attributed to the king of Lydia, Kroisos, circa 561-546 B.C. This silver coin is known as a Siglos, which is a half-stater, and weighs 5.3 gms. This coin was also minted on the so-called "heavy standard", and this coin type is also found in electrum and gold. This coin is in about Extremely Fine condition (EF-/EF-), has good centering, is approximately 17mm wide, and has a nice light gray patina. This coin features a powerful imagae on the obverse, which is the forepart of a lion bearing his teeth with an open mouth, and is facing the forepart of a horned bull. The reverse features a two part incuse square punch. King Kroisos was also the first to abandon electrum coinage in favor of a bimetallic currency based on pure gold and silver. The coin offered here represents this shift in the minting of ancient Greek coinage, and likely was minted 50-75 years after the invention of coinage. A nice example for the type. References: SNG Tubingen 3656; SNG van Aulock 2876. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278900
Apolonia Ancient Art
$9,675.00
This rare Roman bronze figurine is a standing gladiator that dates circa 1st-early 2nd century A.D. This bronze figurine is approximately 3.4 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This animated figurine is a standing gladiator, who is seen raising his left arm to the brim of his helmet, and has his left leg raised as if it is resting on his adversary. His raised left arm may be a signal either to spare or kill his adversary who is perhaps laying injured on the ground. The animated pose of the gladiator depicted here, with his raised arm and hand signal, is scarce to rare relative to Roman bronze gladiator figurines of this type, and is seldom seen on the market. The gladiator depicted here is also a "Murmillo" type, as he is seen wearing a "Cassis Crista", which is a broad-rimmed helmet based on the prior Greek Boeotian type, and the large helmet seen here has an enclosed double face visor, a forward raised crested plume, rounded eye visors, and decorative minute fish scale elements that are seen on the outer bowl. The helmet also has some minute details showing the double opening for the face visor, and this helmet is classified as the "Pompeii G Type", which is rarely seen on Roman bronze gladiatorial figurines as the more common "Berlin G Type". Early gladiatorial helmets, including the ones found at Pompeii, had round eye apertures for the eyes, and were often screened with removable round or semi-circular grating plates, and in addition, the visor grating also consisted of two halves that joined at the front, forming a vertical rib as seen on the exceptional example offered here. The helmet details noted above, relative to the "Pompeii G Type", are seldom seen on Roman bronzes of this type, and is another feature that makes this piece a very desirable example. This figurine is also seen wearing an arm guard on his right arm which is known as a "Manica", which was usually made of thick cotton quilt, leather, and some metal alloys. This gladiator is also seen holding a short sword in his right hand known as a "Gladius", and protective greaves on both shins. In addition, his right leg is seen wrapped with a protective covering which was used to kick at his adversary, and he is wearing a wide leather belt known as a "Balteus". This figurine also appears to be bare chested as well. There is also a palm branch "Palma" seen on his back side, and this was an award for victory in the arena. On receiving his awards, the gladiator made a lap of honor around the arena, waving his palm branch. (See "Gladiator: Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Osprey Pub., United Kingdom, 2009.) The name "Murmillo" is derived from "Mormylos", meaning "seafish", and is sometimes spelled "Myrmillo". This name also alludes to the fish-scale design seen on the outer bowl of the helmet seen here. The "Murmillo" usually fought the "Thraex" or the "Hoplomachus", with whom he shared some of the equipment (notibly the arm guards, the all-enclosing helmet, and the dangerous "Gladius" short sword). The "Murmillo" fighting style was best suited for a man with large muscular arms and strong heavy shoulders that were needed to carry the weight of his shield and sword. Men who played the "Murmillo" were usually shorter and more muscular than most gladiators. The "Murmillo" depended on his strength and endurance to survive the battle against foes who were lighter armed and were suited for attacking. The figurine seen here also appears to be a short, muscular individual. The piece offered here is complete, save for the lower feet that are broken off, and this may have been done as this piece may have been a votive offering, and the breaking of the lower feet would keep the magic and spirit of the figurine in the grave. There also appears to be a shield hanging under the left arm, and a small fragment of this is missing. Overall, the condition of this piece is superb, and has nice detail with a nice even dark green patina, with minute spotty red highlights. (An analogous piece, without the minute detail that the piece offered here displays, was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2003, lot. 13. Approximately 3.1 inches high, $3,400.00-$5,100.00 estimates, $5,593.00 realized.) The piece offered here has also been mounted on a custom display stand, and is a rare type seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spearpoint that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C., and is in nearly Extremely Fine to Very Fine condition (VF+/VF+). The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of a young Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus (VF+) grade. This piece is also perfect for a ring or a pendant. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$13,800.00
This beautiful x-large Greek Apulian ceramic is a knob-handled patera plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 18.2 inches wide from handle to handle, by 6.5 inches high, and is attributed to the Ganymede Painter. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, and is a superb intact example that is 100% original. The overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, save for some minor glaze checkering on the inside surface, and some minor and minute stress cracks which are all normal for an ancient Greek ceramic of this size. This piece also has some minute root marking seen mostly on the bottom base stem, and attractive heavy spotty white calcite deposits that are seen on various sections of the vessel. This piece has not been over-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition, which is scarce for a vessel of this size; and in addition, what is also not often seen is that this piece also has very vibrant black, dark orange, yellow, and white colors. This piece has two decorative black raised handles attached on each side of the raised flat rim, and in addition, there are four raised knobs attached to the flat rim which are seen on each side of each handle. There is an additional knob seen in the top middle of each handle as well. These knobs are also very decorative, and may have served in antiquity as an additional hand grip on the vessel, as this type of vessel was typically used to pour libations. The center of this beautiful plate has a draped seated woman seen seated on a rock, and is holding a plate and floral garland. She is facing a standing nude youth that is seen showing an open box, and is holding a wreath in his right hand. The drapery seen on her body is very detailed and translucent, which lends this figure an erotic look. The entire scene is also balanced with each figure holding an object away from the center of the scene, and in this case, the standing nude youth is seen holding a wreath, and the draped seated woman is holding a garland which balance the scene of the overall composition. Both figures are seen on a "dot-and-egg" pattern band that is seen below a minute "dotted" ground line, and the entire scene is seen within a sacred white olive-leaf wreath that frames the entire scene. The underside of this beautiful plate has a black reserve, with a raised footed base. The Ganymede painter was one of the best accomplished Greek Apulian artists during the second half of the 4th century B.C., and according to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, London, 1989, p. 96: "His drawing is more fluid and his youths have a softer look. He is fond of figures holding fans, open boxes and cistae, divided by two diagonal lines." The piece offered here is a fine example of the Ganymede Painter, and knob-handled patera by this painter are scarce to rare. This piece has a very high degree of eye appeal and is scarce to rare on the market, due to it's condition, esoteric design, and that it has been attributed to the Ganymede Painter, which is rarer than the scarce examples by the Darius-Underworld and the White Sakkos Painters. (A recent example was sold by Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2014, for 9373.00 Pounds/$15,591.00 USD realized. Attributed to the Darius-Underworld Painter, circa 330 B.C., 14.75 inches diameter, 8,000.00-12,000.00 Pounds estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This scarce Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce, and not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1209679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting little piece is a Roman bronze scale weight that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches high by 1.4 inches wide. This piece appears to be a young cherub, with a rounded chubby face, pudgy nose, and slight smile. The eyes are also beaded silver inlay, and the beaded silver eyes lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. There is also an attached hoop at the top which attached this piece to a scale. This piece was likely filled with lead, and this piece served as a scale weight. This piece has a dark green patina, and is an exceptional example. This piece also hangs from a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,800.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large and rare piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This superb to extremely fine coin is a Greek silver drachm attributed to Philip III, and was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-319 B.C., is in superb to extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), is approximately 17 mm in diameter, weighs 4.2 gms, has nice centering, and a light gray patina. The obverse shows Herakles wearing a lion's skin headdress facing right, all within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, holding a standing eagle to the front, with a Greek monogram seen at the front and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering seen behind, all within a dotted border. This coin was minted in the name of Philip III Arridaeus, half brother of Alexander the Great, who was slated to share power with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king Alexander the Great. The real power still lay behind the generals - Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolomy and others - who were all biding their time for power. The coin offered here was likely minted by Antigonos, who had control of the bulk of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. This coin is also attributed to the mint of "Magnesia ad Maeandrum", and "minted circa 323-319 B.C." by Martin Price, who also noted that this mint was also controlled by Antigonos at the time this coin was minted. A nice coin with historical merit, and a nice quality example. References: Sear no. 6750; Price no. P56a. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1283673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This beautiful Roman glass flask dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high. This piece is mint quality, and is in flawless condition with no chips and/or cracks. This piece has an even dark orange-brown amber color, and has an extended flat lip that is a folded everted rim, and an elongated neck. This piece is also relatively "thick-walled", and it has a very durable compact design. This vessel's globular body, with a wide elongated neck that is a third of the vessel's height, is also a hallmark design of Roman Imperial Period glass. This piece has an exceptional brilliant "reddish-gold" multi-iridescent patina, and there is a thin silvery iridescent film layer seen on various outer and inner sections of the vessel as well. The attractive amber color in combination with the bright "reddish-gold" patina, both lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This type of Roman glass vessel is also classified as being "mid 1st century A.D.", by John W. Hayes in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, pp. 34-35, no. 101. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614a. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226436
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 A.D., is approximately 35 mm wide, and grades superb (EF+) to FDC (Mint State). This piece has on the (Obv.) the beautiful draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face of Artemis is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style than what is normally seen, and the young dainty features of the young Artemis have a high degree of eye appeal. The outer decorative elements, seen on the obverse, are seven semi-circles with the Macedonian royal star within, and two dots between each semi-circle. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows a club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. No coins were issued from circa 168-158 B.C., but between circa 158-148 B.C., the coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at its capital, Amphipolis. The second region (DEUTERAS) minted a small number of coins at its capital, Thessalonica. The third region with its capital, Pella, and the fourth region with its capital, Heraclea Lynci, did not issue coinage. In 148 B.C. the four regions were reunited as a Roman province, and no silver coinage was struck for another half century. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin type with superb artistic style and grade are now scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional Greek coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7. SNG Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: