Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1339434
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This detailed little gem of a piece is a Greek silver infant fibula pin that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.2 inches high, by .75 inches wide. This piece is extremely rare to rare, as it was made for an infant, and it has extremely fine details and workmanship. Ancient Greek silver fibula pins of this type, are seldom seen on the market, and there is the possibility that this type of fibula was more votive in nature. This piece is intact, save for the missing pin, and it is "bow-shaped" with three raised "barrel-type" sections seen within the length of the piece. At the terminal end where the rotating pin was attached, there is a dainty, but detailed acanthus design seen on the front side. The back side of this terminal end is flat, and one can easily discern that this side is the back side of the piece. This piece has a lovely light gray patina, with some spotty dark gray mineral deposits. An analogous example can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, accession number: 52.36. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This piece can also be mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece today. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278504
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare piece is a Roman iron javelin head that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, and is a complete example. This piece has a barbed "spiked tang" head at the end, and a rounded lead weight attached to the shaft about 3.5 inches from the end of this formable weapon. This piece has an exceptional dark brown patina, is in superb condition, and is preserved with a wax sealant which has preserved the iron shaft. There are also some spotty dark brown and white calcite mineral deposits seen mostly on the lead weight. This weapon was also known as a "hasta plumbata", meaning "leaded spear", or as referred to by the ancient source Vegetius, as a "martiobarbalus", meaning "Mars-barb". (See Vegetius, "Epitoma Rei Militaris", translated by N.P. Milner, Liverpool University Press, 1993.) Another ancient source, the "De Rebus Bellicus", M.W.C. Hassall and R.T. Ireland (eds), 1979, Oxford, describes the "plumbata Mamillata", meaning "breasted javelin", as a javelin with a lead weight and a pointed iron head, with flights attached to the opposite end of the shaft. The epithet 'breasted' likely refers to the bulbous lead weight. This lead weight was also molded onto and around the iron shaft, and was solidly attached to the shaft. This type of weapon is rare, as only a few examples have been recovered from the British Isles, notably Wroxeter; and even fewer examples have been found in Germany, notably Augst and Castell Weissenberg, and Lorch, Austria. However, the ancient source Vegetius, (1.17), does state that two Illyrican legions were renamed "Martiobarbuli Ioviani" and "Martiobarbuli Herculiani" by the joint emperors Diocletian and Maximianus because of their proficiency with this weapon. He further states that five "plumbatae" were carried by a soldier in the concavity of his shield, and they were thrown at first charge, or used to defend with the reserves and could penetrate the body or foot of the assailant. This weapon was also thought to easily penetrate shields because of the lead weight, and could be thrown at great distance. Vegetius, (1.17), further states that soldiers using the "plumbata" take the place of archers, "for they wound both the men and the horses of the enemy before they come within reach of the common missle weapons". This weapon was truly an innovation in Roman battle tactics, and is a weapon that is seldom seen on the market today, as it was made from iron which easily deteriorates in mineralized soils. Another rare piece of this type is seen in "The Late Roman Army" by Pat Southern and Karen Dixon, Yale University Press, 1996, p. 114, Fig. 46. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269514
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This superb piece is a Greek bronze kantharos that dates circa 350-300 B.C. This attractive piece is larger than most examples, and is approximately 4 inches high, by 4.3 inches in diameter, by 8.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece was made from four individual bronze pieces; the two cast handles, the cast stem base, and the hand beaten bowl. This beautiful piece has some gold gilt seen in various sections of this piece, and has a dark to light brown, red, and dark green multi-colored patina. There is also some spotty light to dark green, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a very detailed stem base, with a centering tang seen on the bottom base and a knobbed center ring seen on the raised stem. There are very few elegant Greek bronze vessels of this type on the market, and is a drinking vessel that is a rare type. This piece probably graced the table of a wealthy Greek person, as in antiquity this type of vessel was expensive to make. For the type see G. Richter, "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes", pp. 216-217, no. 596. An analogous example also sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, June 2001, no. 75. ($6,000.00-$9,000.00 estimates, $7,200.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest quality pieces that have been on the market, and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1260116
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This rare piece is a Minoan culture bronze double-ax, which dates Middle Minoan III-Late Minoan I Periods, circa 1700-1450 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches long by 4.1 inches high, and has an attractive even dark green/brown patina. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, some minute root marking, and is a complete and intact example which is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition. This powerful piece is a hammered bronze piece that is very thin, and is made from two sections that are riveted together with four rivets. These riveted sections also form a central horizontal hole that was used to mount a bronze or wooden rod. This piece is also a votive type piece, as it is made from thin sheet bronze, and is an imitation of a heavy bronze battle ax. The bronze with this piece is also thick enough so it does not bend easily, and the sheet bronze also appears to be nearly the same thickness as the known Cretan bronze helmets that date circa 8th-7th century B.C. These helmets also have minute rivets, and also have a two-part type construction as the votive bronze double-ax offered here. The Lydian word for "ax" is "labrys", as related by Plutarch. The word "labyrinth", derived from the word "labrys", was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the palaces in Crete, such as Knossos, and also referred to the "double-ax" symbol represented by the piece offered here. The symbol of the "double-ax" also always accompanies goddesses, and it seems that it was also the Minoan symbol of the beginning of the creation. This also explains why this piece is votive, and was offered in tombs and sacred places. It is also believed that this type of power piece served as a standard in religious shrines and temples. See F. Schachermeyer in "Die Minoische Kultur des Alten Kreta", 1990, pp. 161, 237, and 238.; and W.H.D. Rouse, "The Double Axe and the Labyrinth, The Journal of Hellenis Studies 21", 1901.; and John Chadwick, "The Mycenaean World", 1976. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1130376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a young God and/or King. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 4.9 inches high by 4.7 inches wide. This intact piece is complete, and has spotty dark black and brown earthern deposits both on the front and back side surfaces. This beautiful piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and has sharp detail. This piece is in the form of a young God and/or King who is seen with an upward gaze, and is wearing a diadem band on the forehead. The diadem band is also a Greek Hellenistic symbol of royalty, along with being an emblem of sovereignty, and this mask may also portray a king and/or a character in an ancient Greek play. This terracotta mask is a votive type piece, and is likely a tragic type theater mask. Votive masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines by individuals who were linked to the theater, and were often dedicated after a trilogy of plays were performed that recounted one of the serious mythological dramas. The single hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering, and is a scarce type. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
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These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075389
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts two hunters slaying two running deer. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 9.9 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and has very vibrant black, light blue, yellow, red, white, and brown colors. One side of this page has two lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are three lines of script seen in the upper left side margin. In addition, there is a single line of script seen in the upper left side corner of the fine-line drawn scene. The back side of this detailed document has 21 lines of script, and there are several lines of script that appear to be added notes that are seen in the left margin of the page and between several lines of the text. The fine-line drawn scene has two hunters on horseback, and they are hunting two deer, as one hunter shoots an arrow into a jumping deer, while the other chases a running deer with a sword. The scene has very vibrant colors, and the sky above the light blue mountains, the saddle blankets, the arrow quivers, and the sword are all highlighted with a gold gilt. The light blue mountains and foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, and in combination with the gold gilt highlights, give the scene an ethereal perspective. The scene may also represent a Persian myth of the hero Rostam, who carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Fourth Stage" of this myth involves Rostam traveling on horseback through an enchanted territory where he finds provisions including a ready roasted deer. This myth is likely what is portrayed on the manuscript page offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1276507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare piece is a Greek Attic "black-figure" alabastron that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, by 2.3 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece has four black bands, with light tan reserve sections seen between, that run horizontally around the piece from top to bottom. This piece is also designed with a wide, flat disk at the top which is a design feature that helped control the flow of liquids from the piece. This piece likely held a precious olive oil, or a perfume-type unguent with an oil base. This piece also has a black "line design pattern" that is seen on the upper third of the main body of the vessel, and this "line design pattern" also runs around the piece. This pattern is often referred to as a "net pattern" which usually is seen with straight lines, but the pattern seen here is seen with overlapping "u-shaped" sections that resemble overlapping scale armor, and there is a strong possibility that this is likely what this pattern is meant to represent. This piece was created at about the time of Athen's victory over the Persians at Marathon circa 490 B.C., and shortly after the stunning Athenian victory, Pheidias designed a massive bronze statue on the Parthenon referred to as the "Athena Promachos", meaning "Athena who fights in the front line". According to Pausanias, this warrior Athena was complete with a helmet, spear, and a scale armor cuirass which also displayed a facing head of Medusa. This image of the warrior Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass is also often displayed on Athenian "black figure" and "red figure" ceramics during the first quarter of the 5th century B.C. The "line design pattern" seen on the piece offered here likely refers to Athena Promachos, and her scale armor cuirass, and the Greek Attic painter who produced this piece, simply transferred this pattern onto this example. In addition, this piece likely held olive oil which was sacred to the goddess Athena, and there was a sacred grove of olive trees which was located near the base of the Parthenon. If in fact the design on this rare vessel is intended to represent scale armor, was the design of this piece conceived to protect a sacred olive oil? This is a question that really cannot be answered, but what is certain is that this alabastron vessel, with this "scale armor line design pattern", is also not seen on other Attic alabastron examples that are classified in the Beazley Archive, Oxford; however, this pattern is seen on other Attic vessels for the period that show Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass. The piece offered here is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some minute surface pitting and scraps. Overall, this elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a very nice example with a rare painted design. This piece also comes with a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: W. Levy collection, U.K., circa 1916-2006. Ex: Bonham's Antiquities, London, April 2007, no. 324. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in flawless condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This scarce huge piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact and is in mint condition, save a small stress crack that is seen in the middle of the spout. The surface of this exceptional piece has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina with a rich glossy black glaze, and some spotty white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel with the facing Silenus head was mold made, and the Silenus head has very high relief and is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type do not usually have this design feature. This piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. A nice intact scarce large vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: J.J. Klejman, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1278878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern red steatite kohl vessel, that dates circa 2nd-3rd Millenium B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a complete intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This interesting piece is rectangular shaped, and is in the shape of a tower. There is a circular opening seen at the top, along with four raised corners, and there is a hollow core that runs down into the center of the vessel. This vessel is also decorated with notches and bow-drilled "recessed concentric circle" designs on all four sides. There are also nine (9) "recessed concentric circle" designs seen on each side, and some of these "recessed concentric circle" designs are more deeply drilled than others. This vessel, besides being a very attractive architectural type piece, is a "kohl vessel" which contained compacted material (grayish-black or white powder). The grayish-black material was known as "kohl", which was used to protect and heal the eyes in a desert and/or an arid enviroment. The white powder, which is sometimes found in this type of vessel, was used to coat the face and served as a sun block. There are also remains of a grayish-black "kohl" material found in the vessel offered here as well. This vessel was also usually fitted with a bronze stick that served to remove and apply the product. This piece also has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections of this piece, and has some attractive deep black colored veins that run throughout this hard red steatite stone. This type of vessel was widespread in the ancient Near East and Mesopotamia, as well as the Iranian plateau, Margiana, and Greek Bactria. However, the red steatite material seen with this vessel is scarce to rare, and was highly prized in antiquity, and there are very few recorded examples of this type made from this beautiful dark red stone. This piece is an attractive scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12955. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1317061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This piece is a Greek "Laconian" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is a scarce brown ware glazed type of vessel, as it has a dark brown glaze seen on the outer and inner surfaces. This piece also has an offset upper shoulder which added strength to the overall body of the vessel, and a raised stemmed base with a flat bottom. This type of piece was made in the Peloponnesus, primarily for use in the region of Laconia, which included the city-state Sparta. The simple design, color, and plain light red clay of this type of vessel appealed to the Spartan austere tastes. It is quite likely that this piece graced the table of a Spartan warrior, and this piece was also made for everyday use as a drinking cup. This scarce piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. There is some minor glaze loss in sections of the vessel, which is normal for a piece of this type, and in addition, there are some minute light brown and white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. Another analogous example of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 180. (1,800-2,200 Pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has nice eye appeal and form, although it has a basic decorative glaze and color. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: