Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321972
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb quality ancient Greek coin was minted in Thebes, and dates circa 371-338 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 12.1 gms, and is in Superb condition, i.e. good Extremely Fine condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has exceptional centering, and a beautiful natural light gray patina. This coin features on the obverse a "Boeotian" type shield that is oval in shape and has small cut-outs at the sides. This shield type first appeared circa 650 B.C., and is also featured on early Greek Attic ceramics. The "Boeotian" type shield was also a smaller sized type that was derived from the much larger "Dipylon" type shield, which is thought to have covered and protected the entire body. The reverse of this coin features a Greek bronze volute krater, and there is Greek lettering seen to the left and right. This Greek lettering is also thought to represent the magistrate who minted this particular issue. The detailed Greek bronze volute krater also has elaborate raised handles, detailed beading along the rim, an egg-and-dart pattern that runs around the upper shoulder of the vessel, and a raised stem base. The image of the volute krater seen on this coin is also more detailed than most examples of this Theban coin type. A coin with nice eye appeal. BMC 111. SNG Copenhagen 314. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #680621
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete piece is a Greek standing terracotta figure of a votaress. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high and dates circa 5th century BC. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration. There are some light brown earthen deposits that are adhered to the surface, and this is an indication that this piece has not been over cleaned, and as such, the surface of this piece is superb quality with little wear. This piece was mold made and was designed with a trapezoidal base. This votaress may represent the Greek goddess Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton and a himation that is seen draped over her shoulders. She has a slight smile and is seen holding a piglet against her breasts with both hands, and this piglet is probably a votive offering. (See Sotheby's Antiquities New York, June 2004, no. 33 and Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2000, no. 84, for other analogous examples. The two pieces cited here are approximately 10.5 inches and 8.25 inches high.) These terracotta figurines are thought to be votive in nature, and represented the offering that is seen within the piece itself, and consequently, this piece was intended as a substitute for the actual offering. This piece is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom wooden base. Ex: German private collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1317061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This piece is a Greek "Laconian" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is a scarce brown ware glazed type of vessel, as it has a dark brown glaze seen on the outer and inner surfaces. This piece also has an offset upper shoulder which added strength to the overall body of the vessel, and a raised stemmed base with a flat bottom. This type of piece was made in the Peloponnesus, primarily for use in the region of Laconia, which included the city-state Sparta. The simple design, color, and plain light red clay of this type of vessel appealed to the Spartan austere tastes. It is quite likely that this piece graced the table of a Spartan warrior, and this piece was also made for everyday use as a drinking cup. This scarce piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. There is some minor glaze loss in sections of the vessel, which is normal for a piece of this type, and in addition, there are some minute light brown and white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. Another analogous example of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 180. (1,800-2,200 Pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has nice eye appeal and form, although it has a basic decorative glaze and color. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This pleasing piece is a Viking bronze buckle that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 3.4 inches in diameter, and is complete save for a small edge chip. This large example has a hand stamped dotted double border, and a raised central boss that has a hole in the center that is approximately .5 inches in diameter. There is a smaller hole, at the side of the central hole, that has a folded pin within that rotates back and forth. This bronze pin is an intact and functional example, and overall, this piece is a solid piece that can easily be worn today. Running around the central hole is a raised floral design that has interlocking features. This floral design is a Viking design that may represent the forces of nature, and was a "protector type" symbol. This piece has a lovely dark to light green patina, and there are traces of gold gilt seen in various sections of the piece. This piece may also have doubled as a decorative brooch, and was held in place with a leather strap. This piece is a superb example, and is large for the type. This piece hangs on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328142
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This esoteric piece is a fragment of a Greek Cycladic idol of the "Kiliya" female type, and dates to the Early Bronze Age, circa 2700-2400 B.C. This nice piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, by 2.6 inches wide, by .67 inches thick. This torso fragment is about one third of the complete piece that it once was, and the breaks are seen at the neck/upper shoulder and below the waist of the figurine. This piece also matches the scale and type of a complete example that was sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 223. ($764,000.00 realized.) The piece noted above and the example offered here, both display three lines in the form of a triangle that defines the waist and the female abdomen. This highly stylized type of piece is a fusion of geometric forms, with relatively massive heads carved in the round atop a long and slender neck, and broad shoulders that slope in graceful curves that end abruptly at the elbows. The arms are also defined by oblique cuts, and extend well into the main body of the torso. There are approximately 32 recorded complete examples of this rare Cycladic marble type, and they range from about 6 to 7 inches high. The torso fragment offered here, if complete, would fall within the range of a complete example as noted above. The "Kiliya" name comes from a site near Gallipoli, where a figure of this type was reputedly found, and this piece is now in the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. This type is also known as a "Stargazer" type, as the heads turned upwards and appear to face up to the sky. This piece also has some heavy calcite deposits seen on the backside, and some lighter deposits seen on the front side which is also an indication of a burial pattern. A fragment such as the piece offered here is extremely rare on the market today, and it is an exceptional example for the type. (A fragment of this type, size, and proportion was offered in New York in NFA Classical Auctions, Inc., Dec. 1991, no. 62, $6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) For additional related examples see J. Thimme, "Art and Culture of the Cyclades in the Third Millenium B.C.", Chicago, 1977, no. 560-566; and "Kunst der Kykladen, Karlsruhe Museum Exhibit 1976", no. 560 and 565. (See attached photo.). Ex: Bomford collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1118927
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This interesting piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a Satyr mask. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 5.1 inches high by 4.2 inches wide. This piece is complete, and is intact, save for some very minute and old stress crack fill. This piece was mold made from a light yellow/tan terracotta, and it has nice detail. There are spotty dark black and brown deposits, along with some minute root marking. This piece is in the form of a Satyr head who is seen with an open mouth, goat horns at the top of the forehead, and goat ears. Satyrs were renowned for their lascivious appetites and mischievous behaviour, and personified the unrestrained fertility of Nature in the wild. They particularly enjoyed pursuing the nymphs, on whom they hoped to gratify their lust. In ancient Greek literature the Satyrs, like the Seleni, were debased and comic figures, for it was the custom of the Greek tragic poets, after presenting a trilogy of plays recounting one of the serious mythological dramas, to terminate their contributions to the festival of Dionysus with the performance of a light comedy based on the activities of these untragic folk. The type of terracotta mask offered here, was associated with the choruses of Greek drama and were often dedicated by revelers during Dionysiac festivals. This piece is likely a votive comic mask, and masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines, and/or graves, by individuals who were linked to the theater, either as a known patron, participant, or admirer of the arts. This dramatic piece shows the face of a Satyr with an open mouth and eyes, which conveys a look of surprize and perhaps even an emotion such as fear. The hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Another Greek terracotta theater mask of this analogous type and size from the David Leibert collection, was offered at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no. 185. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150248
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb coin (EF+/EF+) is a late Roman bronze 1/2 Centenionalis, 20 mm, that was minted by the Roman emperor Constans circa 348-350 A.D. Flavius Julius Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I (the Great) and Fausta, born 320 A.D. He later shared the empire with his two brothers, Constantine II and Constantius II., and later was raised to the title of "Augustus" circa 337-350 A.D. In 348-350 Constans carried out a reform of the bronze coinage, and the coin offered here falls within this period. The obverse shows the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Constans facing right, with the legend: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG around. The line design of the hair is seen in very sharp detail. The reverse ahows a standing Phoenix facing right with a rediate crown, standing on a pyre, with the legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO around, ASIS below. The Phoenix seen standing on the reverse is also one of the few examples of a Phoenix bird that is seen on Roman coinage, and this is a rare symbol relative to Roman numismatics. This coin has a glossy dark green patina, is EF+/EF+ grade, and has perfect centering. (Another example was recently sold by CNG, Auction 279, May 2012, no. 635, for $204.00.) This coin has a rare Roman symbol, and is a scarce Roman coin type. Sear 3978, R.I.C. 332. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1198519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman glass patella cup that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This beautiful piece is approximately 4.5 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches high. This light green glass piece is mint quality, and has a light honey brown patina seen mostly on the outer surfaces, and a iridescent silvery milky-white patina seen mostly on the inner surfaces. There is also some minute root marking and some minute dark black mineral deposits, which are seen within the encrusted surface patina. This piece has a folded ring base, a formed ring behind the lip, a raised inner base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. This piece is also thin walled, is very light in weight for its size, and as such, is a scarce example for the type. This piece is one of the best examples offered on the market, as this piece is seldom seen with an exquisite patina as seen here. An analogous example is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", By John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 196, pl. 171. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338758
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,865.00
This attractive Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This large piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 5.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This scarce piece has a nice even dark gray patina with spotty dark black highlights, and in addition, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from four separate parts: the main "mastos type" cup body, the cast stem base, and the two (2) applied strap handles. The main body is a 'mastos type" cup design, and pieces of this type are often seen and offered on the market as a singular cup. This mastos cup, that doubles as the main body of this vessel, was hand beaten and spun on a lathe into the oval shape that is now seen. The upper lip has an attractive indented surface below the lip that is an esoteric design that took a great deal of skill to produce. The cast stem base was added at the bottom center, and the two applied handles were applied possibly in antiquity some years after this stemmed vessel was produced. It is also possible that the stem base and the two handles were added together in antiquity as well, which produced an elegant table vessel that could stand by itself. The two applied strap handles also have attractive "cross hatching" designs that were hammered into the outer surfaces. This piece is intact, and there are some minor scratches, some minor dents, and root marking which is normal for a vessel of this type, and these features also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The "mastos type" body is also defined by D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 107-109, Fig. 24. (The piece offered here is a "deep conical type" as seen in Fig. 24, no. a. See attached photo.) The piece offered here not only is a scarce type that has an esoteric design, but it also has great eye appeal and was expensive to produce in antiquity. A silver vessel of this type could only have been on the table of a wealthy individual. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This scarce Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce, and not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1199056
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic oinochoe that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This charming little piece is approximately 5.5 inches high. This piece is an Attic blackware ceramic that has an incised designed theater mask in the form of a light red bearded man with a white diadem. This extremely rare example was also produced in the "Six's Technique", as seen with the red beard of the theatre mask with incised hair detail, and the face and diadem with white painted details. According to Joseph Noble in "The Techniques of Painted Attic Pottery", Watson-Guptill Pub., New York, 1965, p. 66: "SIX'S TECHNIQUE: Six's technique of East Greek origin, was usually employed on small vases such as lekythoi, phialai, skyphoi, and Nicosthenic amphorae. It made use of the added white, pink, and red. In this technique the picture was painted with a brush, applying the color to the surface of the vase which had been coated with the black glaze matter, and sometimes details or other figures were added by incision. The vase was then subjected to the usual Attic three-stage firing. This was an interesting technique; the pottery is attractive and has a spontaneous quality, but it is somewhat crude, lacking the refinement of the conventional black-figure or red-figure work." This Attic piece is extremely rare to rare with this type of "Six's technique" design, and in addition, incised theater masks of this type seen on Attic ceramics is not often seen on the market. This piece is also classified as "Type 5B", according to the "John D. Beazley Shape Chart", and is an extremely rare type which is only seen circa early 5th century B.C. This complete piece is repaired from several fragments, and has only over paint where the pieces have come together, and overall, is an extremely fine example with a nice deep black glaze. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1264405
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman bronze key that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches long, by .75 inches in diameter for the ring seen at the terminal end. This piece has a beautiful light blue to green patina with some spotty red highlights. This piece is in better condition than most examples, and is a mint quality piece with well defined groves seen at the end. This piece may have fit a personal strong box, or possibly a small door. This type of key is also published in "Handwerk und Berfude in der Romischen Stadt', by Rieche & Schalles, Cologne, 1994, pp. 46-47. This piece is a nice example of a Roman bronze that was individually owned by a Roman with some means. This piece also hangs from a custom stand, and can easily be worn today in a necklace. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: