Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1307715
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This attractive piece is a Mayan stone hacha that dates to the Late Classic Period, circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.7 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This complete piece is a serpent head with opened jaws that enclose a human head adorned with disk earspools, and each has sunken oval eyes. The serpent head has a crenelated upper lip, and the entire composition of this piece resembles an individual, more likely a warrior, who is seen wearing a hooded costume in the form of a serpent head. Another interpretation of this piece is that this piece represents a Mayan "Vision Serpent", with a warrior brought forth from the mouth of the serpent. This warrior also refers to a Mayan warrior cult that was linked to the evening star (Venus). This cult was also tied to the accession rites of the king, and a large component of these accession rites included the king's wife who underwent a bloodletting ritual so that she could communicate with this warrior, who may have been a dead ancestor, and/or a symbol of the king's role as warrior in this cult. The Mayan name of this "Serpent Warrior" is unknown, but the purpose of the bloodletting rite was to cause the "Vision Serpent" to materialize, along with the emerging "Serpent Warrior". This piece is in the form of a hacha, and may have been inserted into a ceremonial yoke, as this piece has a tenon designed behind the head of the serpent. The Mayan stone yoke and hacha pieces were all associated with the Mayan ballgame, and the piece offered here may also have been used in playing the game as well, as it is a slightly smaller example than what is normally seen. This appealing piece is made from a tan gray basalt, and has traces of red cinnabar. There are also spotty minute black mineral deposits, along with some minute root marking. This piece is a scarce to rare example, as there are very few Mayan stone works of art with the "Serpent Warrior" depicted, in addition to what is seen relative to recorded ceramic examples. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. This piece was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 1997, no. 369. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $5,060.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 1997, no. 369. Ex: Ron Messick Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1399734
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extra large and impressive piece is a Mayan brownware ceremonial tripod vessel that dates to the Early Classic Period, circa 450-650 A.D., and is approximately 13 inches in diameter, by 9 inches high. This impressive piece is a thick walled light to dark brown terracotta ceramic, that has three "slab type" legs attached to the flat base. This tripod bowl vessel is also somewhat heavy, and the three attached "slab type" legs have identical decorative architectural elements molded onto the outer surface of each leg. There are also three separate impressed panels with decorative elements that are seen on the outer surface of the bowl, and these panels are also identical, as they were made with a stamp that was rolled onto the outer surface of the bowl. These decorative elements show a two-part scene that is divided with a column, and to the right of the column, there is an elaborately attired standing figure with outstretched arms holding implements. The left side of the column shows a "central glyph medallion" flanked by winged motifs and stylized birds seen in profile. The "central glyph medallion" has three dots seen in the center, and this resembles the Mayan glyph meaning "moon". This "central glyph medallion" also appears to be attached to a raised stela that is also seen with three dots at the top. The stylized birds seen in profile at each side of the "central glyph medallion" are also of a raptor type with a hooked beak, and may represent either an eagle of a vulture which were both sacred to the Maya. There is also a stylized wavy band seen below. This type of heavy tripod bowl has strong Teotihuacan influence, and is a type of vessel that the Mayan produced in the Early Classic Period. This piece was often used in ceremony, and likely held an offering such as an agricultural commodity, or even a sacrificial head. A thick black glaze was also added at the bottom of this bowl in order to control a liquid, and this is the only glaze seen on this piece. The number "three" is seen multiple times on this piece with the three separate panels, the three "slab type" legs, the three dots seen within the "central glyph medallion", and the three dots seen at the top of the raised stela; and seen in combination, may have some other hidden ceremonial meaning. This impressive Mayan piece is complete, is 100% original, and has been repaired from several large fragments, as most "large scale" Mayan ceramics of this type have. There is also some minute root marking seen on the inside bottom of the bowl and some spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of the entire piece. An impressive "large scale" ceremonial type vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Palm Beach Atlantic College, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May, 1989, no. 377. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce piece is a Colima effigy deer vessel that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.5 inches long, by 6.5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This exceptional Colima vessel depicts a standing deer, with the sides of the body decorated with incised panels that frame two doubled-headed spiders. In addition, there is an incised diamond pattern seen on the frontal shoulders below the raised neck. The head is designed with a pointed nose and peaked ears, and there is a broad spout that forms the tail. This piece has a thin reddish-brown glaze, and some minute tan earthen deposits. This type of vessel is scarce to rare, as it depicts a standing deer, rather than the usual Colima dog types. (For the type see: "Fine Pre-Columbian Art from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Wray, Harmer Rooke galleries, Oct. 9, 1984-Jan. 1985, no. 112.) The piece offered here may also represent a sacred "protector type" piece that was made for the after-life. Ex: Private Florida collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1991, New York, no. 365. ($1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates, $1,100.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the Sotheby's information that describes this piece as an "effigy deer figurine".) .I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358083
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This brilliant colored piece is an Aztec/Mixtec pedestal bowl that dates circa 1300-1421 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.25 inches high, by 7.2 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece is also classified as being of the "Mixteca-Puebla Style", and is also labeled as "Eastern Nahua". This piece is glazed on the inner bowl and the outer surfaces, except for the underneath section of the raised base which is a light tan terracotta. This attractive piece has a brilliant dark red glaze with dark black design features that are very sharp in detail. These design features include a "spiral and stair-step" pattern that is seen in a band running below the upper rim, and this motif may also be a "Wind Serpent" symbol. (For this "Wind Serpent" symbol see "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Aztec and Maya", by Charles Phillips, Lorenz Books, pp. 208-209.) This "Wind Serpent" symbol also ties in with the fact that the piece offered here may have been used for religious ceremonial use in drinking the alcoholic drink "pulque", which was made from the maguey cactus. The Mixtec and Aztec creation myth of "pulque" involved the serpent god Quetzalcoatl, who gave the stimulating fermented drink "pulque" to the people, which would quicken their spirits for dancing and joyful celebrations. The thick red glazing seen on the inner bowl also suits this piece very well for this purpose. This intact piece also has some spotty heavy dark black mineral deposits seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is some minute light root marking. Another analogous vessel of this type is seen in the Cleveland Art Museum, no. 1962.249. (A plate with the analogous and vibrant black and red "spiral and stair-step" pattern is also seen in Bonhams, "African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art", New York, Nov. 2014, no. 85. $2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Overall, a scarce and attractive vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370580
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce Chavin ceramic is a gray-ware bottle that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 4.8 inches in diameter. This piece is also among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean culture. This exceptional piece also has a finely polished and raised design on each side of the vessel which is a mirror image of one another, and this design is likely a stylized avian such as the raptorial "harpy eagle". One can see the stylized oval incised eye at the bottom of the design, and the two rising "four banded" sectional wings and/or head tufts that rise above into the central body of the vessel. The balance of the main body of the vessel is covered with incised "surface punctations" that were produced by rolling a shell mold over the wet clay. This provided a background for the main design and further enhances the design for the viewer. The graceful raised neck of this interesting piece is also glazed, as well as the flat bottom of the vessel. The raised and incised finely polished design of the stylized raptor, also has design elements that are analogous to some of the elements seen on the so-called "Tello Obelisk", seen at Chavin de Huantar, Peru. There are also theories that the supernatural avian, seen on the piece offered here, was an attendant and/or messenger of a celestial deity, rather than dieties themselves. (See "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson, 1995.) The superb piece offered here is also intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and is an excellent representation for the type. This piece also has some minute root marking, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There are also two minute holes for the TL authenticity samples taken from the inside of the upper lip, and the other is on the flat base of the vessel. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, No. 38R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1406949
Apolonia Ancient Art
$375.00
This expressive piece is a Jama-Coaque bust of a shaman that dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches high. The Jama-Coaque culture lived in the tropical forest coastal region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River, and they produced high quality ceramics with detailed features. One such piece is the detailed bust offered here, and it is a bust of a shaman with incised fine-line facial tattoos. This piece is a fragment of a complete individual, and this type is one of the finest detailed busts, as it has a thick dark red glaze over the face with incised details that were carved into the glaze before it was fired. A great many of the Jama-Coaque ceramics are not glazed, and are made from a plain light tan terracotta. The bust seen here may also depict an important person, and this piece may also have been ceremoniously broken as well. This face also has "coffee-bean" eyes, and may show this shaman in a drug induced trance. This shaman has an open mouth, a regal nose ring, and a cap that extends to the back of the head. This piece is a very expressive example, and is of a type not often seen on the market. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive light brown burnishing. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off the stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: This piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1366326
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Moche stirrup vessel depicting a lucuma fruit dates to the Moche IV Period, circa 400-600 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, by 4.25 inches in diameter, and has vibrant orange, dark red, black, and cream colors. This piece has a stirrup handle rising up from the center of the vessel, and the main body of the vessel depicts a very realistic opened lucuma fruit showing the dark reddish/brown seed within. The depiction of the lucuma fruit is very realistic in form, as well as with the color of the reddish/brown seed which in reality, is a glossy brown color. This piece is a votive ceramic, and likely was made to provide sustenance for the deceased in the afterlife. The Moche culture is also well known for it's realistic ceramic portraiture of actual individuals. The piece offered here is one of the best recorded examples of the lucuma fruit and is mint quality, with no repair/restoration. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1340583
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
These two rare Mayan pieces are two carved longbones that date to the Late Classic Period, circa 600-900 A.D. These pieces are approximately 4.3 and 4.6 inches high, and are approximately 1 inch in diameter at the widest point of each piece. These two pieces are intricately carved, and each feature the profile of a Mayan lord, who is seen wearing large jade earflares and an elaborate headdress. These pieces are also published in "The Face of Ancient America: The Wally and Brenda Zollman Collection of Precolumbian Art", Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1988, no. 84 (See attached photo.), and the following is the description of these rare pieces by John Carlson: "The headdresses contain images of long-lipped monsters. At the top of the bone pictured to the right is the profile face of some mammalian creature, possibly a peccary, which does have sky associations. The exact function of such carved bones in not known. They may have been handles for fans, bloodletter perforators, or even musical instruments. Some may also have been used as smoking tubes such as are usually depicted protruding from the forehead of God K. Schele and Miller have also discussed two fine examples of Mayan incised longbones; one is from a jaguar, and the other is a deer tibia. Both images and texts portray dynastic rites. Three additional bones published by Von Winning also present royal profile portraits, and two clearly show the drilled holes for suspension. These carved bones may have been worn as pectorals or attached to the costume for use in some specific, but as yet incompletely known dynastic function. In any case, all such carved bones are clearly high-status objects". The pieces offered here do not have any drilled holes for suspension, but could have, as there appears to be some of the leading edge missing on both ends of both pieces. These pieces are nearly complete, and are in superb condition for a perishable material such as bone, and are some of the best known published examples for the type. In addition, the carved bones offered here may be animal or human, and that fact was also unknown to the academics of the reference noted above, as the description reads: "Carved bone (human?)". The two sacred pieces offered here certainly had royal associations, and were likely used in some sacred regal ceremony and/or religious ritual. These two pieces also sit on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Wally and Brenda Zollman collection, circa 1970's. Published: "The Face of Ancient America", circa 1988. Exhibited: Indianapolis Museum of Art, circa 1988. Exhibited: Indiana University Art Museum, circa 1989. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389637
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a black glazed Colima seated shaman that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 10.8 inches high. This pleasing piece has a deep black lustrous glaze over the entire piece, and is scarce as such, as most Colima examples of this type have a red to reddish brown glaze. This seated shaman is seen gesturing with a left upraised arm, and this arm also forms an open spout. This lively shaman is also seen with his right hand placed on his thigh, "coffee-bean" type eyes, an extended nose, and a serene expression. He is also seen wearing a linear patterned lion cloth that is designed with detailed white incised lines, and these incised designs are seen on both sides of the body. In addition, he is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, and a tall "turban-helmet" with a raised horn that also has side straps that are seen falling to the shoulders. This piece was also likely created as a "protector" type piece, and was an individual that had magical powers. This piece is intact, save for a re-attached left leg, and is 100% original. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example, as it has great detail with the incised decorative elements, and the black glaze that is seldom seen. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1989, no. 100. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1376088
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This pleasing piece is an early Moche culture portrait vessel, and dates to the Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high, by 6 inches wide from ear to ear, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This mint quality example is an unglazed red terracotta, and has a light gray/white wash that was applied to sections of the vessel. This piece also has a raised stirrup handle centered at the top, large staring eyes, a small clenched mouth, sculpted ears, and the majority of the face is covered with the gray/white wash. This wash also lends this portrait vessel a serene expression that has a great deal of eye appeal. This vessel is also one of the earliest Moche portrait vessels, and is the prototype for the subsequent and more numerous Moche portrait vessels. Another analogous example of this rare vessel was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 98. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: Donnan, Christopher, "Moche Portraits from Ancient Peru", China, 2004, no. 27. Ex: Private German collections, circa 1950's and 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369191
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay child and crib textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 10.25 inches long, by 4.25 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. This piece is a young child seen lying within an elongated crib that is tightly wrapped with a white colored textile. The child is also tightly attached to the crib, and is seen wearing a multi-colored garment. The young child has long dark brown hair tied at the back of the head into a loose bun, and cascades over the side of the crib. The nose, eyes, and mouth are made from woven textiles, and appears to be very serene little girl. The short red woven hands are tightly woven, and resemble a "stick figure" with extended fingers and toes. The piece is also made with numerous textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and these Chancay textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, as they promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. This piece also has outer garments that were custom made for this child figure, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. One of the best recorded examples of this type, as it is mint quality, and complete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1260877
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Mayan ceramic that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 4.5 inches high, and is in superb intact condition with only a few minute abrasions. This piece also has an attractive orange and light brown polychrome glaze, with some heavy and spotty black mineral deposits. This interesting vessel is in the form of a sitting rabbit, and has all four legs tucked under the body. There is also a single rattle that is built into the animated hollow head, and rattles of this type are normally seen in the rounded hollow legs of select Mayan tripod vessels. This appealing vessel is designed to sit horizontally as a rabbit would be at rest, and also upright, as if the rabbit is raised up on it's hind legs. In addition, there are three suspension holes, one under each front leg, and one that runs through the head. This allowed one to control a liquid that could then be poured from the raised hole that is seen on the upper back of the rabbit. This piece also has a black Mayan mat symbol which is painted on the belly of the rabbit. The rabbit, for the Maya, was a deity associated with scribal or artistic roles, and was the patron god of the Mayan scribe. According to Michael Coe in "The Art of the Maya Scribe", Abrams Pub., New York, 1998, p. 110: "The much illustrated little Rabbit God writing a codex on the Princeton Vase makes only one showing as a scribe in the art of the classic Maya. He must be the same rabbit that the Maya saw on the face of the moon, and is iconographically linked with the Moon Goddess, who often is depicted holding him in her arms." The piece offered here may represent a scribe as a rabbit, but more likely it represents the "Rabbit God" himself, who also doubles as the patron god of the Mayan scribes. This vessel may also have been a "paint pot" for a Mayan scribe and/or it may also have been a votive vessel for an important individual such as a Mayan scribe. The artistic style of the painted black Mayan mat seen on this piece, is also analogous to the painted mats seen on "Copador" type vessels. The name "Copador" is a contraction of Copan and El Salvador, and refers to the zone of distribution for this type of vessel. This piece may also refer to the 13th ruler of Copan, "18 Rabbit", who acceded to the throne circa 695 A.D., and ruled for 43 years. Under his rule in Copan, Copan's population was growing as never before, and the "Copador" polychrome ware was being manufactured and distributed over a wide area in the Mayan world. This energetic ruler erected many monuments, including one of the largest ballcourts (Ballcourt A-III), which was second only to the Great Court at Chichen Itza. Linda Schele also felt that this ruler was also the greatest single patron of the arts in Copan's history, based on the number of works and the high-relief style of carving. (See "Scribes, Warriors, and Kings", by William Fash, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1991, p. 125.) Hence, it's quite possible that the vessel offered here also referred to this ruler of Copan, in addition to representing the "Rabbit God" of the Mayan scribes. This piece is a rare intact Mayan vessel designed in animal form, and full bodied Mayan "animal form" type ceramics are seldom seen on the market. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #824649
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is from the Jama-Coaque culture that lived in the tropical forest coast region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River. This area is also the region where the Spaniards first encountered the native South Americans. The piece offered here is approximately 10 inches high, dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is intact, save for some missing coffee bean ends seen on the headdress and a very small section of the headdress behind the right ear, and this may have been done as this piece was a burial offering. These breaks appear to be very old, as there is wear in the break areas with burial deposits, and this may have been done to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece for burial. The seated figurine may be a shaman that is seen wearing a headdress, shirt, earrings, and nose ring that are decorated with coffee bean symbols. He also has coffee bean designed eyes and is seen holding a lime pot in his right hand and in his left, a coca pod. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) There are traces of painted designs seen on the lower legs, headdress, and skirt. This piece has spotty black mineral deposits and some minute root marking. An example and type that is now scarce on the market. Ex: Private Arizona collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: