Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1250013
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare and cute piece is a Moche blackware feline that dates Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This early Moche piece is approximately 8.25 inches long by 7.2 inches high. This black glossy glazed piece is intact, and has some attractive light brown burnishing and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This cute piece is a reclined feline that is seen with his long-tailed prey in his mouth, and this prey appears to be a small mammal and/or mouse. This feline's powerful bared teeth are seen holding it's prey securely in place, and this feline also appears to be relaxed, as he is seen reclined with his lower torso to one side along with his wavy tail. This feline is also seen with forward-curving ears, graceful incised whiskers, rectangular nose, and a compact body. There is also a stirrup-spout at the top of the body, and male attributes are seen between the hind legs. This type of Moche ceramic normally does not have prey in his mouth, and as such, is an extremely rare type. Another analogous blackware reclined feline piece, without the prey, is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 14. (See attached photo. $1,200.00-$1,800.00 estimates, $1,210.00 realized.) The feline offered here may be a rare black jaguar, or a smaller feline such as a puma. Wild felines held a special place in the mythology of the ancient Americas. The felines special night vision combined with their powers as hunters were often likened to the power of shamans who would incorporate feline elements into their costumes or paraphernalia. The piece seen here also has enlarged eyes, which emphasize this creature's excellent night vision, and the face of this feline has anthropomorphic characteristics. This type of piece is extremely rare, as it is a type that has the caught prey, is in superb condition, and has great eye appeal. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1181942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This interesting and lively Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This mint quality piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and minute root marking seen on the upper end of the spout and near the lower base of the vessel. This piece has a lively running deer, seen on each side of the vessel, and each deer faces a central dividing "double-bar" symbol which is seen at the front of the piece. This "double-bar" symbol may also represent a sacrificial "tumi", but more likely it simply is a "tie symbol", with a rope and/or cloth tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated Figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or scarifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". The dark red lively running deer are seen against a cream background, and are vibrantly portrayed with an upturned tail, a "floral-leaf" designed ear, an antler reaching forward at the top of the head, and a protruding hanging tongue. This piece also has a conical projection from the the top of the vessel, along with a seated frog that is seen centered at the top within a red fineline petal design, and the conical projection has an attached red stirrup handle seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial sacrificial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb I, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp. 96-97, fig. 10. See attached photo.) The ceremonial sacrificial club also is associated with the "tie symbol" and the lively running deer seen on this vessel, as they may represent deer that are portrayed as being part of a Moche ceremonial deer hunt. According to Christopher Donnan in "Deer Hunting and Combat", seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru", Thames and Hudson, 1997, p. 54-55: "Deer are known to run with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. No other animal in Moche art is shown in this way. Deer are known to run with their tongues out when they are winded or tired, and the artists may have intended to show them in this state. Moreover, when a deer is killed, the tongue will often drop out the side of the mouth through a gap that exists between the deer's incisor and molor teeth. In Moche deer hunting scenes, hunters consistently wear elaborate clothing, headdresses, and ornaments-attire that is altogether unsuited to the stalking and killing of deer. To understand why they are dressed this way, it is useful to consider the ethnohistoric records describing the great hunts practiced by the Inca. The best account is of a hunt held by the Inca ruler, Manco Inca, near the valley of Jauja in honor of Francisco Pizarro around 1536. On that occasion, 10,000 Indians formed a ring around an area 30 to 60 miles in circumference. They then closed toward the center, driving all the animals in the area before them, and forming several concentric rings as their circle grew smaller. When the circle was small enough, designated hunters entered it and killed as many animals as was desired." It's also quite possible that the deer seen on this vessel are portrayed at the point when they were ceremoniously killed, and that they were killed primarily for their blood for it's use in ceremony. In addition, the "floral-leaf" designed ear may also represent a deer's ear that has been engorged with blood from stressed running. The Moche placed a great deal of importance to the deer hunt, and the piece offered here shows artistic features that point to this fact. This mint quality piece is a scarce example of Moche fineline ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 279006, dated July 6th, 1990.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Walter Knox collection, Phoenix, AZ., Ex: Private CO. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1047632
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This cute piece is a Colima standing warrior that dates circa 150 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches high and is intact, with no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a light red/orange terracotta, and has some minute dark black spotty dendrite deposits. This piece is also a whistle, with an opening at the top and at the back of the hollowed head. The whistle is well made, and makes quite a sharp high-pitched tone. This piece was likely ceremonial, and may have been part of a group ceremony. This type of piece is also known as a "protector" type piece, and is thought to protect the deceased in the afterlife. The standing warrior seen here is nude, and is seen holding the full body length shield with both hands. The shield is leaning against the upper body of the warrior, and only the upper half of his face/head is seen peeking above the upper end of the shield. The design of the curved shield protects a great deal of his body, and it is probable that this stance illustrates the type of warfare that was conducted by the ancient Colima. It is unknown if he is part of a shield wall with many warriors, as was the case of the phalanx formation that was deployed by the ancient Greeks, or if he is simply depicted as an individual warrior in combat. The warrior is also seen wearing a turkey tail feather crest/helmet, and this makes him seem larger than life and more imposing. (A turkey whistle with analogous designed tail feathers, as the crest design seen here, is seen in "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico" by Michael Kan, Los Angeles County Art Museum, 1989, no.169.) An interesting piece that has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Yvette Arnold collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Fl. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1339482
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce piece is a Moche ceramic finial in the form of a moving snake, and dates circa 100-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches wide for the width of the head. This powerful piece has a nice dark to light gray polychrome glaze, with some attractive dark brown to black burnishing. There is also some spotty dark black mineral deposits, and this piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration. This powerful piece displays a snake in the act of coiling for a strike, and one can see the open mouth with the bared teeth. The head is very detailed with some incised linear markings, refined raised eyes, and a well-defined boney head. The overall piece looks very realistic, and this is an artistic style hallmark of Moche ceramics. The snake closely resembles an anaconda or a boa with the flat nose and open and raised eye design. This piece was also made from molds, and one other analogous example of this type was on the market several years ago, and this piece may have been made as a pair for a bier or as a support for a canopy. Another theory is that this piece was made for a wooden ceremonial wooden staff, and the snake for the Moche shaman, was thought to demonstrate his power by controlling opposing forces in the supernatural world, and this in turn, would allow the shaman to become a living god able to cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. For this discussion relative to the powers of Moche shaman see: "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California Press, 1978, p. 139. This "power-type" piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it really looks alive, and it sits somewhat upright on a custom metal stand. Ex: Dr. Baker collection, NM, circa 1980's. Ex: Splendors of The World, HI, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : South American : Textiles : Pre AD 1000 item #1338394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a Bolivian textile that dates circa late 19th century, and is approximately 26.25 inches wide by 34.5 inches long. This Bolivian "Ahuayo" type textile is generally woven in alpaca, and sometimes sheep wool was added as well. This attractive example also has a very tight weaving design and there are many knots per square inch. The weaving of this piece took and great deal of skill, as well as time, because the weaving is very fine and detailed. This piece has alternating striped bands in light purple, teal blue, white, red, and rose colors. This piece is stitched from two halves, with a slit in the middle that forms a poncho. This piece was also likely made for a child or a young man judging from the overall size of the piece. The fabric holding both halves together also appears to be somewhat old, and may have been done at a later date. The piece also appears to be in extremely fine condition, and is intact. The colors are also vibrant for the period, and this piece is a scarce example. This piece is also analogous to the example seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1986, no. 35. ($800.00-$1,200.00 estimates, $1,045.00 realized. See attached photo.) This piece can also easily be mounted in a clear Plexiglas case which would enhance it's high eye appeal. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York circa 1980's. Ex: Private Santa Fe, NM, collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1307402
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large Mayan poison bottle dates to the Late Classic Period, circa 550-800 A.D., and is approximately 3.75 inches high, by 3.45 inches wide, by 1.5 inches thick. This mold made piece has a mirror image on each side that was pressed into the clay with a stamp. The image seen here is an audience scene between the Mayan God K, seen seated on the left, who is conferring with the seated Mayan God L that is seen to the right. Seen between them is a glyph band that is comprised of seven individual glyphs. Both of the Mayan gods seen here are also clad in intricate regalia and jade jewelry. God K also has an elongated snout and a smoke scroll that is emerging from his forehead, and God L, one of the lords of "Xibalba", who has an old man's wrinkled face, is seen wearing a distinctive "Moan Bird" headdress with upturned feathers. The Mayan "Moan Bird" was named "Oxlahun-Chaan" or "13-Sky", and he is the Mayan personification of the "Katun" and of the "sky". This piece also has mirror image double glyph bands seen on each side of the vessel. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb to mint condition. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive light brown burnishing. There are also traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas on the outer surface, and this piece probably held powdered incense, or colored pigments, or red cinnabar that was sacred to the Maya. Red cinnabar was also widely traded within the Mayan world, and it was this type of vessel that was used to facilitate this trade. Red cinnabar has preservation properties, as it was mercury based, and this is why this type of Mayan bottle is often referred to as a "Poison Bottle". The Mayan elite also lined their tombs with this material, and in addition, traces of this material are often found on Mayan ceramics, as the Mayan tombs and ceramics were given "eternal life" with this type of material. This piece is a superb example, not only for it's condition, but also because the mold made and stamped images are very clear. This piece is also safe to handle, as the red cinnabar is deeply embedded into the clay and there are only trace amounts. An analogous example with the same stamped design and condition was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1996, no. 344. (The Sotheby's example has the normal size that is approximately 3 inches high. $1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,070.00 realized.) Ex: New York collection, circa 1990. Ex: Ron Messick Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, circa 1990's. Ex: Spendors of the World Gallery, Haiku, HI. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594176
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This Chavin/Cupisnique water carrier is an early type Chavin ceramic and dates circa 900-600 B.C. This piece is intact and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or breaks. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and has a cream and light red polychrome glaze. There is some light brown burnishing seen mostly on the bottom, and there is also a very small drill hole that is seen that was done for a thermoluminescence test (TL test). This TL test was done by the prior private collector in Germany, and it was done by Kotalla Laboratory. This document is included with this piece.(The results of this test place this piece circa 600-400 B.C.) This cute piece has a friendly warm smile and projects an easy going carefree feeling. The design of the face is very simple, and comic-like, but this was probably the intent of the potter/artist. This type of piece is rare for an Andean ceramic, as most Andean cultures such as the Chavin and the Moche were based on a warrior cult that used live captives for sacrifice. The Chavin/Cupisnique produced some of the first and finest ceramics in ancient Peru, and the stirrup-spout seen on this vessel was their invention. This allowed the Chavin/Cupisnique potters to move this piece around in the kiln with a stick, and they were able to produce pieces that had bright colors with even glazes such as this piece. This water carrier may be a representation of a person, but more likely, it is an anthropomorphic form represented as being from the spirit world. There is also a face seen at the front of the main body of the vessel that may double as a clothing design. This piece may also be from the "Cupisnique" culture as noted by Richard Berger in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", page 90-99. He notes that this type of ceramic, with it's trapezoidal arch and single spout with the flaring end, are creations of the initial phase prior to the appearance of what we know as true Chavin style ceramics. The TL test seems to support this view. Most early pieces of this type have simple line design details for the eyes, nose, and other facial features/body design as this piece shows. This Chavin/Cupisnique piece is a rare, early type and is a large example. Ex: Private German collection. Ex; Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1261165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is an Olmec stone celt/ax that dates circa 1200-550 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.4 inches high by 3.5 inches wide. This intact piece has beautiful dark-green, blue, and white colors, some dark brown mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the piece, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits that are seen on all of the outer surfaces. This trapezoidal shaped piece has a nice semi-sharp blade, seen at the top of the piece, and the bottom tip of the bottom base is unfinished, as this is the original outer edge of the stone from which this piece was formed. This piece also has an esoteric slight bend that runs through the length of the main body, and perhaps this was done to make this piece resemble an ear of corn that is seen peeling away from the central cob. The Olmec were also known to have this type of piece worn on a belt, and the wearer doubled as the Olmec "Maize God", who was meant to represent the central cob of a maize ear. According to Karl Taube in "Olmec Art at Dumbarton Oaks, Library of Congress Pub., 2004, p. 129: "But, for the Middle Formative Olmec, the key plant was maize, the ear of which, in its very form, resembles a green stone celt. With their broad, curving bits and narrow polls, the outlines of Olmec celts are so similar to Olmec representations of maize that it is frequently difficult to distinguish them. Moreover, much as maize seed is prepared on the stone metate, celts and other jade artifacts were surely ground and polished on flat stone surfaces. Through the process of grinding, both maize food and finished jade are created." This type of piece was valued by the Olmec for its beautiful color, as this piece was very labor extensive to produce, and this intensive grinding and polishing resulted in a highly glossy surface which still can be seen with this piece today. This type of piece was also traded widely by the Olmec, and may also have represented a set value of wealth. This attractive piece also comes with a custom black metal stand, and simply slides down into the stand. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1325875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads, along with a jade "Celt-God" pendant, which is also known as an "Ax-God" pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the "Celt-God" pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inches wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and pendant were "bow-drilled", with a hole created from drilling at each end. The beads are also a combination of different types of jade and jade-type stones, with some darker in color than others. The pendant shows "line-cut" design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. One can see design "line-cut" work that looks like an open mouth and head at the top of the pendant. The back side is flat, and the "line-cut" design is seen on the concave front side. There is also minute mineral deposits and root marking seen on the pendant and most of the beads, and most, if not all of the beads appear to be ancient, and have mineral deposits and patina. These pendants had magical properties, and were worn as personal adornments which also conveyed that status and rank of the owner. The "Celt-God" pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is also explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Pre-Columbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993. This piece can also be worn as is, and can also be displayed in the included custom display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239527
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This rare piece is a Salinar/Viru culture monkey "transformation" type vessel that dates circa 400-200 B.C. This piece is approximately 9 inches long by 7 inches high, and is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece is a standing quadruped with a stylized lobed monkey's head, and a short tail is seen curled at the back. This piece is seen standing on sturdy legs, with each flank painted with mythical creatures that have bared fangs and claws. The whole piece is covered with a light yellow-brown slip, and the mythical creatures and facial elements are painted in a light reddish-orange color. This piece is also a "stirrup-handle" type piece that is also designed as a "whistle" type vessel, as it makes a shrill sound when one blows into the raised end of the handle, and as such, this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel. In addition, this piece also represents a "transformation" type vessel, as the stylized lobed head on the monkey has human and animal features. This rare early Andean culture ceramic may also be a prototype for the subsequent Moche I ceramics, and as such, this type of piece set the standard for Andean ceramics that have a great deal of realism regarding both human and animal representations. This piece also has some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a superb example for the type that is seldom seen on the market. Another analogous example of this culture is seen in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 49. (See attached photo. The Lempertz example also has an analogous painted mythical creature on the flanks as the piece offered here, and both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop.) This type of piece is x-rare to rare, and has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1986. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available for the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 01/14/1991, no. 369012. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1320798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This superb Mayan "orange glazed" bowl with a glyph band dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 5.25 inches high by 7.75 inches in diameter. This piece is intact, and has some heavy root marking, along with some white calcite and spotty minute dark black mineral deposits. This attractive piece has a flat bottom, and has a graceful rounded body which gradually narrows towards the rim. This piece has a bright "orange glaze" with a red and black band seen just below the rim. Below this decorative red and black banded design, a black painted glyph band is seen running around the vessel that consists of fourteen identical glyphs. The glyph band was also painted from right to left, and the beginning and end of the glyph band is seen, as the last glyph painted does not have the added "speech scrolls". The "speech scrolls" were not added to the last painted glyph, because the artist ran out of room within the overall composition, and could not over paint into the first painted glyph. This repeating glyph is also analogous to the glyph seen in "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Books Inc., New York, 2002, p. 146, Fig. 8-11. (See attached photo.) The glyph seen on the vessel offered here, along with the published glyph noted above, both have "speech scrolls" attached at the left side of the rounded main body of the glyph, and these "speech scrolls" represent a "quotative particle" in Mayan iconography, meaning as the term "quotative" indicates, certain particles (glyphs) attribute phrases to individuals as though these were the figure's utterances or actual speech. In the case of the glyph seen here, it is interpreted as "it is his saying", which may also be interpreted as "this vessel belongs to him". It is interesting to note that this glyph repeats again, and again, around the vessel within the glyph band, and in this case, the presence of this glyph tells us that this object belongs to someone. This type of possessive reference is a well-known reference seen in dedicatory Mayan ceramic texts. The piece offered here is as attractive, as it is interesting, and this type of Mayan ceramic is scarce on the market today. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249675
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche seated man that is Moche IV Period, circa 450-550 A.D., and is approximately 8.3 inches high. This interesting piece is intact, save for a filled stress crack in the upper stirrup-handle, and is in superb condition with vibrant dark red, light brown, and cream colors. This piece is a seated Moche man who is dressed with regal ear flares, a wrapped headdress, a dark red back sack, and a cream colored tunic. The individual portrayed here does appear to have some social status in a regal or religious context, as he is seen finely dressed, and he is also seen holding a ceramic in each hand which may point to a ceremonial activity. This individual displays a pronounced facial deformity, which was also held in high regard by the Moche, as this was thought to be a sign from the gods. Special status and sacredness may have been accorded to those who suffered diseases and other physical handicaps. The pronounced deformed face of this individual has skin drawn tight over the bones, and is likely the result of a tropical disease. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture, and the piece offered here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture. Moche ceramics that are medical related, and depict individuals with diseases and/or deformities such as this piece, are rare to extremely rare. Another analogous example that portrays a deformed face is seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., by Kathlenn Berrin, San Francisco, 1997, no. 69. (See attached photo. This portrait-head type vessel seen in the Larco Herrara Museum may also be a portrait of the same individual as seen on the ceramic offered here. Both pieces have analogous features and are both Moche IV Period.) The individual seen here with the deformed face and diminutive nose was likely caused by a tropical disease known as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symtoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasel septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring. (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) The piece seen here likely displays the disease noted above, rather than a battle injury, or a ritualistic mutilation, but whatever the case, this interesting piece is an extremely rare Moche vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #1242679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This scarce piece is a Chimu/Inka culture silver mask that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This piece is approximately 8 inches wide by 6.9 inches high by 1 inch deep. This appealing designed piece is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the lower nose section, and is complete with no restoration/repair. This piece has a nice dark gray patina with some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and thick dark/light brown mineral deposits are seen on the back side of this piece. This piece was also hand beaten from a single silver sheet, and there are punched cheek, nose, and mouth details. There are also two punched horizontal shaped eye holes, and two holes on each side which were used to tie this powerfully primitive designed piece to a textile shrouded mummy bundle. This piece also has very little bend, and also served as a solid cover for the mummy bundle. The primitive design of this piece may also have been designed to represent the departed in the spirit world, and also served to protect the mummy. This piece is also the normal size for a piece of this type, and another scarce piece of this type classified as Chimu culture is seen in "Peru, Durch Die Jahrtausende", Verlag Aurel Bongers KG, Recklinghausen 1984, Austria, Kat.-Nr. 11.67, Linden-Museum, Stuttgart, Museum no. M 31 059. (The Stuttgart example is approximately 8 inches high and has analogous punched out eye holes, and punched nose and facial details. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a powerfully primitive designed facial image that defines the essence of Pre-Columbian Andean art. This striking piece also comes with a custom shadow box, and can easily be removed, as it is mounted within with removable plastic tabs. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 149, Lot 371, Zurich, circa 1990. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that is Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1245720
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This striking piece is a carved stone sculpture that is attributed to the Recuay culture, Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is a solid stone piece that is approximately 4.5 inches long, by 3.4 inches wide, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is a dark brown color, and has minute dark black and spotty white mineral deposits. In addition, there are faint traces of red cinnabar deposits that are seen in the low relief areas of the rounded eyes and incised teeth. This piece is an excellent example of Recuay stone sculpture, as it has sharp angular or circular lines, and flat surfaces. The Recuay culture was a highland contemporary of the Moche, and was organized into small independent militaristic polities, and their art often depicted creatures that seen to be supernatural in character. The head seen here is a supernatural feline with ears seen at the top, and a wide mouth with prominent angular designed teeth. The circular eyes, open mouth filled with teeth, and angular flat nose seen at the front, identify this creature which is often referred to as the "moon animal", because of it's association with crescents and other celestial imagery in the coeval Moche style. The so-called "moon animal", a feline or foxlike creature with a triangular form of nose projecting from its face, plays a principle role in Recuay art and is common on fine Recuay pottery. (For an analogous piece and an explanation of the "moon animal", see the "Spirit of Ancient Peru; Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., New York, 1977, no. 24, p. 93. See attached photo.) This piece offered here also reflects the Recuay monolithic stone sculpture that was free-standing or incorporated into masonry walls, and was carved so that its undecorated shaftlike back could be inserted into a wall socket while the carved supernatural visage projected out of the wall in tenonlike fashion. This type of artistic design allowed the viewer to see a piece that "comes alive" in a simplistic fashion, and as such, this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. This splendid stone piece is mounted on a custom wooden and Plexiglas stand, and is angled upwards for the viewer. Ex: Splendors of the World Gallery, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: