Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and dates to the Late Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd century B.C.- 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This weight also conforms to seven (7) Greek Macedonian tetradrachms (Alexander the Great) with a weight norm of 17.36 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive piece a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1364438
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare ceremonial stone ball is attributed to the Taino culture, and dates circa 1100-1250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.3 inches in diameter, and is a perfect sphere. This piece is a hard sandstone that is native to the Caribbean region where the Taino culture dwelled, and there also have been many ceremonial ball-courts found in Puerto Rico, where the Mesoamerican ballgame was played with a rubber ball. The piece offered here may have been from this region of the Caribbean as well. This interesting piece features many geometric designs that were minutely hand pecked into the stone, and the designs appear to be a mirror image of one another when one rotates the stone. This piece was definitely a "votive-type" piece, and may also have been a trophy for the ball-game itself. The exact ceremonial nature of this piece is unknown, but what is known, is that this piece was definitely connected to the ceremonial ball-game. This game was also believed to have been played by only bumping the ball with the elbows and torso. This piece also has some minute dark black and gray mineral deposits, and some slight wear in various sections of the piece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display ring. Ex: Throckmorton Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328373
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This complete Greek bronze is a bronze oinochoe pendant and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This piece was a "votive" type piece and was used as an offering at a temple or an oracle site such as Delphi or Dodona. This piece is in the form of an oinochoe which was used primarily for pouring wine, and as a sacred offering, this piece may have contained a wine offering as well. This piece has an attached strap type handle, and was cast as one piece. The interior is also hollow, and is not a solid example. There are also incised lines that run around the vessel, and these linear lines are a hallmark design feature for Greek bronzes from the Geometric Period. This solid cast piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece has a dark black/brown patina, and there are spotty dark brown mineral deposits seen on the outer and inner surfaces. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed as it is mounted with clay. An interesting piece, as well as an early Greek bronze. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1367435
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This lovely Aztec/Mixtec tripod dates to the Late Postclassic Period, circa 1000-1450 A.D., and is approximately 4.2 inches high, with a diameter at the rim of 5.5 inches. This piece is intact, with no noticeable repair/restoration, and has a light polychrome slip in black, cream, and light red colors. This piece is a tripod bowl with flat plank extended legs that also extend past the outer diameter of the bowl, and because this design, this piece is very stable sitting on a flat surface. This piece also has an attractive black and red "line-designed" geometric pattern that runs around the outer edge of the bowl, and are likely spiritual in nature. In addition, there are raised "line-designed" symbols seen on the inner surface of the bowl, and these symbols are likely sacred as well. These symbols are also completely intact, and this is rare for vessels such as this, as the raised lines are often broken and have missing sections. This piece was also produced by the Mixteca people for the Aztec nobility who preferred these vessels for their food service vessels. It's also unknown whether these vessels were used to grind or abrade a foodstuff or other organic substance, or weather they served a solely ritual, service function. An interesting intact vessel that is becoming scarce in today's market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373047
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce Roman bronze lamp dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long, by 1.1 inches high. This piece is complete, has no breaks and/or chips, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two openings, one in the top center for filling oil, and the other at the end of the vessel that would hold the wick. The other end of the vessel has an attachment hoop for a chain, or a cord, and could have been hung as a votive offering pendant. This piece also has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself. This piece not only was likely made as a votive offering, but it was also likely functional as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with dark red highlights, and has some heavy dark brown mineral deposits on the inside of the vessel. This piece comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This powerful piece is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and likely depicts the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This portrait bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right, as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece is likely a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can also be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This portrait bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as also seen in the bronze portrait bust offered here. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights, and sits on a custom display stand. Ex: New York private collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389023
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Colima warrior that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 14 inches high. This reddish-brown seated warrior has long youthful limbs, and is seen with the raised right arm balanced on his knee. His cupped right hand perhaps once held an implement, or a lance made from perishable material. This warrior also appears to be in a trance, and has a rounded face with closed "coffee-bean" style eyes. He is also seen wearing a pendant tied around the neck, a headdress/helmet with a small "feline headed" medallion, and raised inlay stone tattoos on the shoulders. The left side of his nude torso is also decorated with a band of black geometric "line-design" tattoos. This piece has very realistic body molding seen on the back side of the vessel, and has a very angular nose. His ears are also pierced for earrings, and overall, this warrior exudes a regal like appearance. This piece was offered for the deceased, and was likely a "protector-type" figurine. The form of this Colima piece is also rare, and the figurine offered here is a rare example that is also known as the "Coahuayana Valley" type. This piece is also intact with no apparent repair and/or restoration, and has some spotty and minute black mineral deposits. A superb large example with a high degree of eye appeal. For the type see: R. Townsend, "Ancient West Mexico, Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past", The Art Institute of Chicago, 1998. Ex: Sotheby's Parke Bernet, Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 165. ($2,200.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2004, no. 268. ($4000.00-$6,000.00 estimates). Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1370697
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Greek Illyrian helmet dates circa 6th century B.C., and is approximately 12 inches high, from the top of the crest box to the tip of the cheek pieces, and it is a full size example. This beautiful piece has been classified in "Antike Helm", Lipperheide and Antikenmuseums Collections, Mainz, Germany, 1988, pp. 59-64, as being "Type II, Var.B". This piece is in flawless, mint condition, and has no repair/restoration, and is one of the best examples on the global market. This piece has slightly elongated cheek pieces, a detailed punched decorative dotted band that runs around the outer perimeter edge, and a well-defined crest box. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze, and the crest box was added into the construction of the helmet, not only to define an attachment area for the crest which was likely made from bird quills, but also to give extra strength to the main body of the piece. The added crest box also was designed to protect the warrior from overhead blows. There is also a slightly extended neck guard which is finely made as well. This exceptional example also has some very minor horizontal scraps and nicks which is also an indication that this piece was in battle. This piece has a compact and attractive design, and is one of the top examples for the type. In addition, this piece has an exceptional dark green patina with dark blue highlights which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. The patina seen on this attractive piece is also in "as found" condition, and this helmet has not been over cleaned as most examples. This piece also comes with a custom metal display stand. Ex Axel Guttmann collection, Inventory no. 517, Berlin, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Dallas, Texas collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #590958
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare Greek glass Canosan plate dates from the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-3rd century BC. This piece was likely made in Canosa, Apulia, that is in southern Italy, and is a circular cosmetic plate. The vessel is approximately 6.25 inches in diameter by .8 inches high, and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or chips. This piece is surprisingly heavy for its size as well, as this piece was cast in a two-piece mold and was then smoothed by grinding and polishing. Cast glass is thicker and denser than glass that was free blown, and is more difficult to produce. With the advent of glass blowing technology that was perfected by the Romans, they were able to mass produce glass vessels in great numbers with a wide range of shapes. The earlier Greek cast glass was limited to mostly plates, bowls, and cups with added handles. There are very few Greek cast vessels in the marketplace today, as most ancient glass seen on the market is Roman blown glass. This piece is the one of the few extremely rare "Canosan" glass vessels that are currently on the market, and there have been only a very limited number of these cast glass vessels that have ever been offered at auction. This beautiful piece has subtle concentric circles that can be seen, and these were created from the grinding/polishing process. This piece is colorless with a light greenish tinge, and this color is the more common color for glass of this type. This color also matches the majority of the ten Canosan vessels that are now in the British Museum and were donated by the executors of Felix Slade in 1959. A shallow dish that is analogous to the piece offered here is from this group, and is seen in "Masterpieces of Glass" by D.B. Harden, British Museum Pub. 1968, p. 31, no.35. The piece offered here has a thick milky white patina that is adhered to the outer surface, and in places where this is missing, the glass has a multi-colored iridescence. There are also traces of minute root marking and mineral deposits. In "Early Ancient Glass", by Frederick Grose, Toledo Museum of Art, page 186 the following is seen: "To date, five hoards of glass vessels have been identified. Three are known to have been found in separate multichambered family tombs at Canosa; two are thought to have come from this locale but lack documentation. In addition, a few isolated examples from single burials can be attributed to the town. Elsewhere in Magna Graecia, vessels of the group have been found in Campania, at Reggio in Calabria, at Naxos and Morgantina on Sicily, and in Etruria. Outside Italy, sites in Greece, Asia Minor, along the Black Sea, and possibly Cyrenaica have also yielded examples. The number of recorded vessels of the group now stands at about sixty, illustrating a dozen main forms and variants, (see Fig.92)". The vessel offered here is of the type illustrated in Figure 92 as noted above, and is a a rarer form for a circular cosmetic plate, as most of the known examples have upturned rims. (For a Greek Hellenistic light green-tinted cast bowl of the same shape as the piece offered here, although it has a ring base at the bottom and is approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, see: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 152. $6,000.00-$9,000.00 estimates.) If you are a collector of ancient glass, this may be one of the few opportunities to own an extremely rare Canosan glass vessel from this group and of this type. Ex: Hadji Soleimani collection, London, circa 1980's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1381237
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact Romano-Egyptian terracotta fish that dates to the Roman Period, circa 30 B.C.-324 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece was made with a dark red-tan clay, and was mold made from two halves. This attractive piece also some thick gray-white deposits, which was also made from it's original white gesso that coated the entire piece. This piece has a curved body that creates movement for the viewer, and there is an open mouth, a small vent hole under the body, and detailed fins. This piece was also likely a votive object that provided sustenance for the departed in the after-life, and this type of piece is also relatively scarce on the market. This piece also likely depicts a Nile perch, which was a popular fish in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402930
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Mycenaean/Minoan bronze goddess figurine that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1100 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high, by .68 inches wide at the fluted base, and is a normal size relative to the known recorded examples. This attractive figurine has a tubular shape, and was cast as one piece. The body is also hollow, and there is an opening seen at the top, along with a "v-shaped" opening at the front of the body. This opening is where the neck/head was attached, and this was likely made from a perishable material such as wood or bone. There are also incised lines seen just below the raised arms at the shoulder area, and this decorative "linear line design" is also seen on many examples of early Greek art from the Late Bronze Age, circa 1300 B.C., down to the Geometric Period, circa 750 B.C. These extremely rare bronze figurines may have been a grave offering, and/or could have been an offering that depicted significant rituals that were associated with rites of passage that involved the departed. The figurine offered here could also have been part of a group of several figures of this type, that together, could have portrayed a ritual as noted above. This theory was developed by Daniela Lefevre-Novaro, and her theory was supported by the figural terracotta models that were found in the Minoan Kamilari burial complex in Kamilari, Crete. (See "Coming of Age in Ancient Greece", by Jenifer Neils and John Oakley, Yale University Press, 2003, pp. 40-43.) The arms of the figurine offered here are also seen extended into the air, and this is an ancient Greek sign of "blessing" and "mourning" death, and this posture is depicted on ancient Greek art from as early as the Late Bronze Age, circa 13th century B.C. The type of figurine offered here is also thought to have originated in Crete, and has also been identified as being a "mother goddess" connected to fertility. (See "Ancient Cyprus" by Vassos Karageorghis, 1981, p. 125.) In summary, this extremely rare piece is likely a goddess figurine that represented several of the aspects noted above, and was either a votive grave offering, or an offering in a shrine. This esoteric bronze goddess figurine is intact, has no repair and/or restoration, and easily stands by itself. This piece also has a beautiful light brown to dark green patina with some dark blue/green highlights, and some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402052
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This piece is a scarce Etruscan black glazed-ware kernos that dates circa 5th-4rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 3.1 inches wide. This interesting vessel has three raised interconnected containers that all have a base ring and a flared rim. There is a suspension ring seen at the center, and the black glaze is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of the vessel. This type of vessel is known as a "Kernos" vessel, meaning "a vase for multiple offerings", and was used in religious ceremonies such as the Eleusinian Mysteries. These sacred vessels were made to contain ritual ingredients such as wheat, barley, honey, and wine. The "Duenos Inscription", one of the earliest known "Old Latin" texts, dated to the 7th-5th century B.C., was also found inscribed around a small Etruscan "kernos" vessel as the type offered here. (See Arthur Gordon, "Notes on the Duenos-Vase Inscription in Berlin", California Studies in Classical Antiquity, Vol. 8, 1975, pp. 53-72.) These sacred religious vessels were also used in the cults of Demeter and Cybele, as this type of vessel was specifically made for religious ceremonies. This scarce and intact vessel has no repair and/or restoration, some spotty light brown mineral deposits, some minor light brown burnishing, minor root marking, and is a superb little vessel for the type. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Export Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398950
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric green hard stone piece is a Valdivia-Chorrera hacha that dates circa 1500-600 B.C., and is approximately 5.85 inches long, by 4 inches wide, by 1.7 inches thick. This piece was produced by the Valdivia-Chorrera culture that lived in modern day Ecuador, and was one of the earliest pre-Columbian cultures of South America. This piece is a votive type object and is shaped as a battle ax, and is a type that is also referred to as a "hacha". This piece was smoothed and polished into the refined form that we see today, and this process was very labor intensive. The surfaces of this piece are very refined, and one can easily see the veins and multi-colored inclusions which enhances it's sacred "raison d'etre". This piece is also a hard serpentine type stone, and it's dark green color was highly prized among many pre-Columbian cultures. A near identical example was offered at Christie's, Paris, Art Pre-Columbian: Collection Felix Et Heidi Stoll ET A Divers Amateurs, April, 2019, no. 8. (1,000.00-1,500.00 Euro estimates. 1,000.00 Euro realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: