Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357105
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with hemispherical shields are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These lovely pieces are approximately .68 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the hemispherical shields are approximately .25 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 1.6 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The hemispherical shields have a smooth facing surface, and have a great deal of eye appeal because of their simplicity of design. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. These pieces are a nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and have a pleasing eye appeal. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, no. 43. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1313572
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This exceptional piece is a massive Roman glass bottle that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This beautiful piece is a pale blue-green color, is free blown, and has a slightly indented "dimple base". This piece also has a long cylindrical neck that is constricted at the lower end, and has a flanged "roll-band" below the rounded rim. This "roll-band" was designed to act as an aid for a portable seal over the opening, such as an animal skin or textile seal. This large-scale piece was also likely a storage vessel for a precious oil or unguent. This piece has a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, exceptional smooth surfaces, and some minute root marking. Large-scale Roman blown glass vessels like this example took a great deal of skill to produce, and large-scale pieces with balanced symmetry like this example are rare on the market. In addition, flawless examples like this piece are also not often seen as well. A rare and exceptional large-scale piece that has an interesting design with a brilliant multi-colored patina. Ex: Private Geneva, Switzerland, collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 138. ($6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Greek bronze coin is a Tarsos (AE 26mm), and dates circa 164-27 B.C. This coin is approximately 27 mm wide, weighs 16.3 gms, and is in very fine/good very fine condition (VF/VF+). This coin is also scarce regardless of grade, and overall, this coin is a better example than what is usually seen, and in addition, this coin has a beautiful even dark green patina. The obverse (Obv.) features a seated Tyche on a chair facing right, holding a grain ear, and below, the river god Kydnos is swimming right. The reverse (Rev.) features Zeus Nikephoros seated on a throne facing left, and is holding a Nike with a magistrates legend seen below the extended arm. The Greek legend (TARSOS) is also seen behind the detailed throne. The design of the seated Zeus and throne also copies the earlier coins of Alexander the Great, and the seated Tyche seen on the obverse is also a scarce depiction in ancient Greek coinage. Tyche was the patron goddess of Tarsos, and was easily recognized in antiquity as such, and this is also an explanation why this coin has no obverse legend. A nice Greek bronze with a beautiful dark green patina. References: Sear 5674; SNG Levante 979. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #836800
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This complete piece is a solid bronze cast of a leaping lion. This piece is a vessel handle, as the two front legs have a groove under the paws which fit over the rim of a vessel. This exceptional and extremely rare bronze dates circa 150 B.C.- 225 A.D., and may be Parthian. (For another analogous example that is of the exact size and type, and may be cast from the same mold see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals. The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European Art.", Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, no. 659.) This complete piece is approximately 3.8 inches high by 3.7 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The head is seen turned to one side and has a very realistic expression, and is a superb example of art from the period. Mounted on a custom marble base. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1368735
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This lovely Greek Attic ceramic is a black-glazed kylix that dates circa 450 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.75 inches high, by 7.7 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as this piece has a thick and lustrous black glaze that covers the entire piece, as well as a very compact esoteric form. The form of this Attic ceramic is very esoteric, as the bowl is suspended with a stemmed base, and the upper rim has an offset shoulder. There is also a modeled ring where the semi-globular body joins the stemmed base, and a hollow annular base ring that is within the stemmed base. The overall form is compact, and all of the few recorded examples are rather small, which is also a good indication that these compact thick black-glazed vessels were created for drinking concentrated wine at expensive dinner banquets known as "symposia". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, save for some minute stress cracks where the handles meet the body, and there is no apparent repair/restoration. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits seen on various sections of the vessel. This piece is also an extremely rare form that is seldom seen on the market, and there are very few recorded examples. (One of the few published examples is seen in "Minoan and Greek Civilization from the Mitsotakis Collection", published by the N.P. Goulandris Foundation, Athens, 1992, no. 366. See attached photo.) Another example is seen in "Black and Plain Pottery of the 6th, 5th, and 4th Centuries B.C., The Athenian Agora XII", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #615970
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This rare piece is an early Greek terracotta that dates circa 6th century B.C. This piece is an applique that depicts a male that is seen wearing a conical hat, which was a royal symbol in the Achaemenid (Persian) Period circa 800-330 B.C. This piece is probably from Cyprus which was heavily influenced by the Achaemenid Empire circa 6th century B.C., but the artistic style of this piece is Greek. This piece has a portrait that is very analogous to the Greek marble Kouros from Melos, circa 555-540 B.C., that is now seen in the Athens National Museum. (See Gisela Richter, "A handbook of Greek Art", Da Capo Press, Inc., New York, 1987, p.63-64.) According to Richter: "In this general period appear also a few draped male figures, evidently intended to represent not athletes but important personages. They have come to light in Samos and elsewhere and show marked Ionic (Greek) influence". The artistic style of this terracotta is an extremely fine example of the Ionic Greek style that shows a receding chin, almond eyes, and a slight smile. This period of art was a step towards naturalistic representation, and moved away from a strict geometric representation of the human form. This Greek artistic style is only seen approximately over a sixty year time frame, and is rarely seen in Greek marbles, but is seen more relative to Greek terracottas, as many of these terracottas were votive in nature. This may be the case with this piece, and it is a rare example, not only for the high degree of art that is seen, but also because it also has a regal element relative to the conical hat that may depict a royal personage. The conical hat is also very analogous to the hat seen on the colossal stone bust of Antiochos I of Kommagene, circa 64-38 B.C., that is seen at Nemrud Dagh, Turkey. The mixture of Iranian and Greek elements, in both the blood and names of the rulers of Kommagene, was also reflected in their monumental art. The terracotta seen here is also a mix of an eastern type with Greek artistic style, and as such, is a rare form of ancient Greek art that is seldom seen on the market today. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high and has traces of white pigment. This piece is also intact and is mounted on a custom stand. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1182929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This extremely rare piece is an Egypto-Minoan terracotta jar that dates circa 2nd Millennium B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has some spotty light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of the piece. In addition, there are some minute root marks and fibers that are seen within some earthen deposits that are seen mostly on the stem base of the piece. This piece has a smooth inner surface, and on the outer surface, there are panels of incised lotus leaves that are seen running around the vessel from top to bottom. There are also eight punched holes evenly spaced around the vessel, which served as holes which likely strained liquid from inside the vessel, and this left a heavier mixture of material in the bottom half of the vessel. There is also an applied strap handle that is seen on one side of the piece, and the upper lip of this vessel also has an overhang on the inside, and this allowed one to easily pour and strain more liquid from this piece. This type of vessel may have been used in the production of a beverage such as beer, which required the straining of fermented water. The stem base of this piece is also analogous to both Egyptian and Minoan vessels that were produced circa 1800-1500 B.C. (See "Minoan and Mycenaean Art" by Reynold Higgins, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1971, pp. 38-40, figs. 30,31,32, 74 and 75. See attached photos.) This piece is an extremely rare vessel which also has an Egyptian motif in the form of the incised herringbone lotus leaf design. Ex: International Diamond Corp. Collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1975-1986. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1986-2011. Ex: Superior Galleries, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364381
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This group of twenty Greek and Roman gold beads and fittings date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd century B.C., to the late Roman Imperial Period, circa 3rd century A.D. This group ranges in size from approximately .1mm in diameter, to 12mm in diameter for the larger round beads. All of the gold pieces together weigh approximately 9.1 grams. The pieces in this group all have an attachment hole for the stringing of a necklace, or possibly for a bracelet in antiquity. Some of the beads and fittings have minute detail, and would make an excellent addition to a modern work of jewelry, or an ancient gold display. A nice group of ancient jewelry with many shapes and sizes. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360510
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This nice Egyptian swivel ring dates to the Second Intermediate Period, circa 1650-1549 B.C., and is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter and was made for an adult male. This piece is in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. The stone has no cracks or chips, and the overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality. This piece has an attractive green-black steatite stone that swivels around a wire that runs through the piece. This piece has a clever design, in that the wire that runs through the extremely dense steatite stone, is wrapped around a bronze hoop at each end of the stone. The overall design of the ring is very esoteric, and the ring with the raised steatite stone is very noticeable on one's finger. The bronze hoop also has a pleasing dark brown-green patina with some minute red highlights. The attractive green-black steatite stone was highly polished in antiquity, and it still retains a great deal of it's brilliant luster. The stone also has a thin multi-colored iridescence that is seen on both the upper rounded side, and the flat bottom side. This ring is durable enough that it can easily be worn today, and the stone also swivels freely around the inner wire. A nice Egyptian ring that is a high quality example. A black ring display stand is also included. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private new York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon" or "cothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well, and are scarce in this "as found" condition. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1027901
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is a carved jade pendant that is from the Costa Rican region, and dates circa 300 B.C.-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high, and is part of a complete "axe-god" pendant. This piece likely formed a complete piece that was approximately 4.25 to 4.5 inches high, and may have been string cut into three near equal sections. This beautiful dark green jade piece is the upper section of a complete pendant, and is in the form of an avian head. The dark green color is even throughout the entire piece, and is from a high quality section of the stone from which it was cut. This detailed jade head has superb workmanship, and has bow drilled eyes, wing design cuts seen on each side, and a bow drilled hole through the side which the wearer was able to use in order to suspend this piece as a pendant. This piece was worn by the elite as a "power" type piece, and appears to represent either parrots or owls as emphasized by the tufts as seen at the top of the head. This piece is analogous to two examples that are seen in "Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica", Detroit Institute of Art, Abrams Pub., 1981, no.24 and 26. (See attached photos.) This piece also has an unpolished "septum" that is seen at the back of this piece, and was a result of string cutting a stone into three seperate pieces in order to produce three pendants. (For this manufacturing process see, "Precolumbian Jade" by Frederick W. Lange, University of Utah Press, 1993, pp.270-274.) This piece also has some spotty light brown surface deposits that are seen in several low relief points of the piece. This piece is rare, as it was a segment from a complete "ax-god", and this complete and sacred "ax-god" was likely cut into three segments so that each piece could have been given to family members of the prior owner. The piece offered here, subsequently became a votive grave offering, and the "power" of this piece passed from one generation to another. This type of segmented votive piece was also known to have occurred with the Olmec, as evidenced by Olmec hard stone pieces that are published in "The Olmec World, Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, Abrams Inc. Pub., 1995, nos. 158 and 159. (The pieces illustrated are both jade masks that were string cut and/or broken into a section, and was then reworked and repolished. It is unknown whether these masks were broken accidentally or for a ritual purpose, but what is known, these pieces were valued as they were reworked and repolished. See attached photos.) The rare votive piece offered here was also reworked and repolished afer it was cut at the bottom, and this type of votive piece is seldom seen in the market, or in private/public collections. This piece is a superb example of Costa Rican jade. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. This piece can also be easily worn on a cord as well. Ex: Private Mass. collection. Ex: Arte Xibalba, Osprey, Fl. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek coin is a Superb grade (EF+/EF), Achaian League silver triobol/hemidrachm, that dates circa 196-146 B.C. This superbly graded piece is well centered, is approximately 18 mm wide, and weighs 2.49 grams. This coin shows the bearded bust of Zeus facing right (Obv.) within a dotted border, and the Achaian League monogram (Rev.) within a wreath, with a club of Herakles above, and minute lettering (IY) seen to the left. This coin has exceptional artistic style, as the bust of Zeus has very fine detail with realistic features. This coin may also have been minted in Argos, which was one of the many cities that comprised the Achaian league in the northern and central Peloponnese. The League was also the foremost state in Greece after the eclipse of Macedonian power, and in 146 B.C., the League declared war on Rome, which resulted in the complete destruction of the League and the sack of Corinth, it's chief city. The coin offered here is rare in this grade, as most examples are Very Fine (VF) in condition. Ex: Frank Kovaks collection, San Francisco, CA., circa 1980's. References: Sear 2984. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338480
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This superb quality Greek bronze coin (17mm) was minted in Pherai, and dates to the circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is graded EF+/EF+ (Superb quality), is approximately 17mm in diameter, and is scarce in this grade. This piece has on the obverse, the goddess Hekate facing right, wearing a laurel wreath and earring. The image of Hekate on ancient Greek coinage is rare, and is seldom seen. Hekate was called the daughter of Demeter or Pheraea, and was associated with the fertility of the ground. The ancient city of Pherai was also named after Pheraea as well. The reverse has a detailed head of a lion facing right with an open mouth, and the Greek lettering of PH-ERAI seen around the head of the lion. There is also water seen flowing forth from the lion's open mouth, and the image of the lion seen on this coinage may represent a public and/or sacred fountain. This piece also has an attractive even dark green patina, with some light dark green surface deposits. Pherai was a city located west of Mt. Pelion in Thessaly, and was the second largest city in ancient Thessaly after Larissa. Reference: Sear 2207. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: