Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #595700
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This piece is a superb example of an early Italic bronze that is probably Villanovan and/or early Etruscan. This esoteric piece dates circa 6th century B.C. and is in the form of a standing male Kouros. This form is a Greek convention of art which was derived from earlier Egyptian statuary, which was geometric in design, rather than realistic in form. This piece is an excellent example of the figural Greek "geometric form", which is also described as the "Kouros" and "Korai" type statuary which was produced in the 7th-6th century B.C. This piece was cast as one solid mass and was then stamped with round circles for the eyes, nipples, and navel. This piece has geometric period designed squared angled shoulders and jaw, arms at the sides, and a serene face which looks alive with the large round eyes. This piece is analogous to the piece that is seen in "The Etruscans", Mario Torelli ed., Rizzoli Pub. 2000, page 591. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches high and it sits on a custom clear plexiglas stand. This piece also stands by itself and has a dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is scarce and is a superb specimen for the type. Ex: Christie's Antiquities New York, June 1994, no. 174. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #599951
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare Greek marble dates from the 6th-4th century B.C., and is the upper torso of a griffin. This esoteric piece was part of a table leg known as a "trapezophoros" that supported a table top with several other identical legs. The "trapezophoros" types are usually designed with panther or lion heads, and the rarest type is the griffon type, and only a handful of these examples are known. This piece has a bird-like mouth and tongue, with cat-like short ears and eyes, and eagle feathers seen on each side of the neck. For the Greeks, the griffin symbolized the destroying power of the gods, and during the 5th-4th century B.C., it came to represent an anti-Persian symbol. A limited number of Greek gold staters, minted by Alexander the Great in Asia, had this symbol on the Corinthian helmet of Athena, which was seen on the obverse of this coinage. This symbol was also prevalent on Greek armour at the battle of Gaugamela in September 331 B.C., where Alexander the Great finally smashed the Persian army by decimating over 165,000 Persians, and this battle forever defined the ultimate confrontation between the East and the West. In ancient Greek art, the griffin was also applied in the decoration of friezes, and the Romans followed this tradition, with one of the finest examples seen at the temple of Antoninus and Faustina in Rome. This piece is approximately 14.5 inches high, and on the custom wooden stand it is 17.5 inches high. This solid piece is quite heavy, and it rotates on the stand as well, allowing one to easily display this piece at different angles. This piece has some chips to the mouth area and to the right ear, otherwise the bust of the griffin is nearly complete. This esoteric piece has a nice light brown patina and it is a very decorative piece. The griffin is seen with an open mouth and it exudes a lively look. An extremely rare early Greek piece with a great deal of symbolism. Ex: F. Hirsch collection, Germany. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #599095
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This superb Roman bronze piece is an applique with the image of Silenus. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., and is in the form of a facing head, with an attached peg that extends about 1.5 inches from the back side of the applique. This piece was probably mounted in an object such as a furniture piece, or a bronze and wooden door, or a composite work or arms such as a Roman shield. A piece with this type of design, with the extended peg, could have fit in a number of objects. The Sileni were native not to Greece, but to Phrygia in Roman Asia, and personified the genii of springs and rivers. Unlike the Satyrs who derive chiefly from the he-goat, the Sileni derive rather from the horse, whose tail hooves, and even ears they possess. This piece clearly shows the horse ears and shows Silenus as a fat old man, snub-nosed, always drunk, who was in the retinue of Dionysus. Silenus was the tutor of Dionysus and had helped him form his character. The diameter of this piece is approximately 1.4 inches and the length is approximately 2 inches. This piece has a dark green patina with red highlights and the detail is superb. There are some dark green mineral deposits seen on the extended peg. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom black/plexiglas base and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1209679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting little piece is a Roman bronze scale weight that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches high by 1.4 inches wide. This piece appears to be a young cherub, with a rounded chubby face, pudgy nose, and slight smile. The eyes are also beaded silver inlay, and the beaded silver eyes lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. There is also an attached hoop at the top which attached this piece to a scale. This piece was likely filled with lead, and this piece served as a scale weight. This piece has a dark green patina, and is an exceptional example. This piece also hangs from a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1222815
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive coin is a silver Alexander the Great tetradrachm that was minted in Babylon, circa 323-318/7 B.C., weighs 16.9 gms, and grades VF+/VF+. This coin was minted under Philip III Arrhidaios shortly after the death of Alexander the Great in Babylon circa 323 B.C. This coin may have been struck by Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I who were all at the time allied with Philip III Arrhidaios, and were acting on his behalf. The obverse of this coin shows the head of Herakles facing right wearing a lion's skin within a dotted border; and the reverse shows a seated Zeus, with M before and AY below. The Greek lettering meaning "King Alexander" is seen below on the ground line, and behind the throne. The minute facial details of the seated Zeus are very defined as well. This coin has exceptional artistic style, and the head of Herakles may also have been designed to represent the deified Alexander the Great. The Herakles head also has a rounded design, which is also a hallmark artistic design of the Babylon mint. An analogous coin of the same dies was sold in Triton XVI, Jan. 8, 2013, New York, no. 296, EF grade, for $1,057.50. References: Price 3692; SNG Saroglos 635. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, IL, circa 1989. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #776893
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This superb coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Pella, the capital of Macedonia, and the mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. The seated Zeus is also seen holding the sacred eagle which was a messenger of the gods. Behind the seated Zeus, is the name, Philip, who was the half brother of Alexander, and Philip III was declared king after the death of Alexander. The obverse shows the head of Heracles in a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander, and was likely intended to portray both Heracles and Alexander. The flan of this coin is very large, and one can see the edge of the die that runs around the outer edge. This in itself makes this coin an exceptional example, and is not often seen in this size. ( 20mm in diamter. ) This coin also is approximately 4.3 grams, and is minted on the Attic standard. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #1150907
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman marble that is in the form of a human hand that is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long by 2.2 inches high. This piece is nearly a complete example of a human hand, as it is broken in the upper wrist, and is a fragment from a larger statue. This piece has a light tan patina, has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and is a superb qaulity marble. The hand is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag, which is also an attribute of the Greek god Hermes/Roman god Mercury, as Hermes and Mercury were both a god of merchants that presided over trade. The hand also appears to be that of a young man, as the fingers are slender and the upper part of the hand appears to be somewhat feminine in nature. The subsequent Roman creations of Hermes were often modeled after the early Greek 4th century B.C. creation of Hermes by Praxiteles, which was found at Olympia in 1877. (For a description of this piece, see "A Handbook of Greek Art", by Gisela Richter, Phaidon Press Limited, Oxford, 1987, p. 144.) This prototype statue of Hermes by Praxiteles is a young man, with slight feminine features, and is portrayed with a convention of classical Greek art that portrayed the gods and goddesses as being eternally young. The marble piece offered here also has these features which not only point this fragment as likely being attributed to Hermes, but also illustrates an earlier Greek convention of art. (Another example approximately 2.75 inches long was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 312. 700-1,000 Pound estimates, 1,500 Pound/$2,427.00 realized.) The piece offered here is a nice scarce piece with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #600190
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring". This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. and it was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom. This piece was mounted on a war chariot and was used as a guide for the horse reins, as the reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer more control over the horses. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high by 2.5 inches wide, and is large enough for two sets of reins to pass through. The design of this piece, with the raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins. There was also a mounting peg that went up the inside bottom, as this piece has a recess hole. This piece was made during the period when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 B.C. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a spear and shield, was new to the Romans as a weapon of war. Chariots were used by the Romans as a method of transport and not as a war machine, and not even the Celts of Gaul used a war chariot. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried the warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the tribe whose Gaulish capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooden frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology and the piece seen here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This piece has a graceful shape, has a nice dark green patina, and is complete and intact. (See Bonhams Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no.339 for a comparative example. 2500-3500 pounds estimate.) This piece is also mounted on a custom clear plexiglas/marble stand. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1226091
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare piece is a Roman glass ingot that dates circa late 1st century B.C.-late 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches in diameter by 1.5 inches high, and is a solid piece with a uniform shape. This piece has a beautiful deep purple/black color, and has an analogous color to the rare early blown Roman vessels such as the Portland Vase. This piece was spun on a rod, and was then broken off when cooled, as the flat bottom has a pontil-mark. The top of this attractive piece is slightly rounded, and the overall shape of this piece is very esoteric. The deep purple color of this piece was the color of the Emperors, and was highly prized by the Roman elite. This piece was likely made for transport to a highly specialized workshop which could create a masterwork glass vessel such as a bowl or a pitcher, and in addition, this piece was a valuable commodity due to it's color and fine quality. This may be the reason why this piece was made as an ingot, as the color and quality of this glass ingot was very desirable in another market, and it's quite possible this piece was produced in a glassmaking center such as Sidon. This piece has a light multi-iridescent patina with minute root marking, ground marks, and spalls. The patina is also thicker in the low relief areas of the pontil-mark on the bottom of the piece. A Roman glass example of this type was offered in Christies Antiquites, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 88., and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C., is approximately 2.4 inches in diameter, and is composed of dark purple, white, yellow, and gold colored bands. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Another Roman glass example of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 1999, no. 96, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., is approximately 2 inches in diameter, and is composed of mosaic-pattern colors of white, red, white, and dark purple. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $1,725.00 realized.) This superb piece has a great deal of eye appeal, a beautiful deep purple color, and is a rare Roman glass object that is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom clear Plexiglas base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1040039
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a large Greek pitcher that dates to the Greek Geometric period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high by 8.5 inches in diameter. This superb piece is a light gray terracotta and is near mint quality. This intact vessel also has no noticeable chips and/or abrasions which are usually associated with ceramics of this type. This attractive piece also has nice light to dark brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. There is a single strap handle and trefoil mouth which allowed water and/or wine to be poured in a controlled manner. This piece also sits on a ring base that stabilizes this vessel a great deal, and together with the trefoil spout, are design innovations that represent a huge leap in ancient Greek ceramic design/production. This piece is scarce in this size and near mint condition, and is a very attractive early Greek light gray ceramic. Another analogous example nearly the same size is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1991, no.245. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that is Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150248
Apolonia Ancient Art
$198.00
This extremely fine coin is a late Roman bronze 1/2 Centenionalis, 20 mm, that was minted by the Roman emperor Constans circa 348-350 A.D. Flavius Julius Constans was the youngest son of Constantine I (the Great) and Fausta, born 320 A.D. He later shared the empire with his two brothers, Constantine II and Constanyius II., and later was raised to the title of "Augustus" circa 337-350 A.D. In 348-350 Constans carried out a reform of the bronze coinage, and the coin offered here falls within this period. The obverse shows the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Constans facing right, with the legend: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG around. The line design of the hair is seen in very sharp detail. The reverse ahows a standing Phoenix facing right with a rediate crown, standing on a pyre, with the legend FEL TEMP REPARATIO around, ASIS below. The Phoenix seen standing on the reverse is also one of the few examples of a Phoenix bird that is seen on Roman coinage, and this is a rare symbol relative to Roman numismatics. This coin has a glossy dark green patina, and is EF/EF- grade. (Another example was recently sold by CNG, Auction 279, May 2012, no. 635, for $204.00.) This coin has a rare Roman symbol, and is a scarce Roman coin type. Sear 4009, R.I.C. 332. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1148500
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek amphora that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 220-180 B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high, and is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, cracks, and chips. This piece is a light red terracotta, and has an attractive white over glaze with some earthern deposits. There are also some minute spotty black mineral deposits and root marking, and this piece is in its natural "as found" condition. This piece has a flat bottom, attractive rounded body, and two raised strap handles which attach just below the lip of the vessel. This piece resembles a pelike, but unlike a pelike, this piece has a narrow opening with raised handles which are attached below the upper lip of the vessel. This design type is a common feature that is seen with most Greek amphoras. This piece also has a "double lip" type design, which allowed this piece to have a seal over the top which could easily be secured with a cord below the top lip. This type of piece has a very pleasing eye appeal, and is very decorative. In addition, this piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market in this mint condition. Ex: Private New Jersey collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon" or "cothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well, and are scarce in this "as found" condition. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1130040
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This beautiful piece is a Roman silver ring with a red carnelian that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is a size 7-7.5, and is approximately 17 mm wide across the top face, and 27 mm high from the top of the stone to the bottom of the ring. The silver ring bezel is solid silver, and the thick red carnelian is translucent which seems to glow in daylight, and this beautiful glowing effect is very noticable when the light hits this piece. Another noticable feature of this ring is that the flat face of the stone is carved with a standing eagle with outstreched wings, and above is a standing winged Victory goddess who is seen holding a victory fillet at the front. The standing winged Victory is also seen with her feet lifting off the ground, and is seen floating above the standing eagle, who in turn, is seen standing on a ground line. The combination of this design is very powerful, as it presents a "real world" symbol, with the standing eagle on the ground line which represents Rome and the power of Rome, and the floating Victory, which represents a "spiritual world" symbol, with the power of the Victory goddess. The meaning of this combined symbolism is "Victory for Rome", and the Roman eagle was a common symbol associated with the Roman legions, and was the most prominent standard of the Roman army. Roman legionnaires often had a private shrine with a Roman bronze or silver eagle which they worshipped for good luck, and many of these small bronze and silver eagles can be seen on the market today. The Roman soldier who choose this ring as his signet, not only shows his loyalty to Rome, but it also evokes the strength of the Empire and its military, and as such, this ring likely belonged to someone that was in the Roman military and/or was likely connected with it to a high degree. The artistic composition is very skillfully done, and the carving of this gem is better than most examples. The red carnelian gem is also a large example, and is approximately 20 mm high by 14 mm wide. The condition of the gem is superb, save for a small internal fracture that can be seen below the eagle. The silver ring bezel was solid cast, and has some minute root marking and checkering that is seen mostly under high magnification, and this is normal for a silver ring of this age. The patina is also a light grey, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Overall, this ring is an exceptional large example, can easily be worn today, and is rare example in the market. Another Roman silver ring dated circa 1st-2nd century A.D., with the same type of bezel design and a carved standing Ceres goddess, can be seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, Dec. 1999, no. 118, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates. (See attached photo.) This piece also comes with a ring box for display. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: This piece also comes with additional documentation that is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1182861
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This piece is a Greek bronze finger ring that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7.5, and likely was made for a young man or woman. This piece has a flat face, with a beveled back face, and an attached ring hoop. This piece is very solid, is in superb to mint condition, and can easily be worn today. The back beveled face also allows this piece to easily slip on and off the finger. There is some slight wear to the back face, and this is a good indication that this piece was worn by a living person, and simply was not solely a votive object. This piece has sharp engraving, and the engraved composition has detailed deep relief. This piece shows a flying Nike facing left, and a seated draped woman below who may represent Ledo. The flying Nike was the Greek god of victory, and this example has wings above and is holding a victory wreath in front. The Nike is in the act of crowning the victor with the wreath, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on Hellenistic coinage and objects. The seated woman who may represent Leto, made love to Zeus, and she bore him the great archer-deities Apollo and his sister Artemis. The combination of these two symbols seen on this ring is very powerful, and likely offered the wearer "victory in life". This ring may have been used used a personal signet seal ring as well, as it makes a sharp impression. (See the attached photos showing the ring impression that was done in soft clay.) This ring has a nice dark green patina with some minute dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is a superb example for the type, and is a scarce example. (For the type, see J. Spier, "Ancient Gems and Finger Rings", Malibu, 1992, no. 85.) A custom black velvet ring stand is included. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #812519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This dramatic "power" type piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is from the Peten region of the Yucatan Peninsula, which is Guatemala/southern Mexico. This exceptional piece is a Mayan green stone mask that likely was a pectoral that served as the central element in a ceremonial necklace. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches wide by 4.8 inches high, is a complete example with no repair and/or breaks, and is in superb condition save for some minor roughness at the back top. This green stone mask may be fuchsite or a diopside, as there are attractive (mica?) speckled silver inclusions that are readily seen within the stone. There are also light brown mineral deposits seen on sections of the outer surface, and dark brown mineral deposits seen in most of the lower relief sections of this piece. The Maya highly valued this type of green stone, and there are few authentic ancient Mayan green stone objects carved made from this material, and as such, this piece is rare to extremely rare . This piece was valued highly enough in that it was placed as the central component in a ceremonial necklace, and there is a bow drilled hole on each side of this mask that held it in place within the necklace. In addition, the eyes and mouth were formed into the stone by a "pecking" technique, and the back side of this piece has a concave surface. (For an anlogous designed necklace made from a similiar type green stone see "Maya" by Peter Schmidt, Ed., Rizzoli Pub., Venice, Italy, 1998, no. 140. This piece is also seen in the Museo National de Antropologia in Mexico City, Inv. no. 10-000220.) Carved green stone objects, such as the extremely rare piece offered here, were highly valued by the Maya and reinforced the high rank of individuals wearing them. In the Classic period, green stone objects and beads made for the Mayan elite actually achieved the status of "money", such was the importance and acceptance of these objects. One principle reason for this was that these green stones are the same color as sprouting maize, which represented life on earth and eternal life in the spirit world. Sacred Mayan green stone objects were passed down from generation to generation, placed in sacrificial caches, and used as grave offerings. The pectoral mask offered here is also interesting in that the design of the face resembles the Mayan hieroglyph "ahau", meaning "lord", as it is written in its simplest form. There are also many forms of this common Mayan "lord" glyph, and this "lord" glyph evolved over time, but the form of the piece offered here is closest to the simple "lord" glyph seen during the Classical period, which is also the period that this piece was produced. Both the simple "lord" glyph and the piece offered here have rounded eyes and mouth, thick lips that run around the mouth opening, and two vertical lines that run from the upper lip to the forehead that form the design of the nose and the face of the glyph. (For this theory and a chart of line drawings relative to the evolution of the "Ahau" glyph see "The Stylistic History of the Mayan Hieroglyphs", by Dr. Hermann Beyer, Tulane University Pub., New Orleans, 1932.) The fact that this mask resembles the Mayan simple "lord" glyph is not surprising, as it was probably an important Mayan lord that wore this piece in ceremony and perhaps even in death, and as such, this piece can be considered an important "power" type object. This piece is mounted on a custom metal base and can easily be removed. This piece has also been authenticated by examined in great deatil by Mr. Robert Sonin and Mr. David Joralemon in New York. Ex: Martin Falk collection, Long Island, New York (acquired circa 1960's.). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Pre-Columbian Auction, New York, Auction 46, no.125. Ex: Private French collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: