Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #778770
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865
This banded white and light yellow marble Sumerian stamp seal is in the form of a recumbent fox and dates circa 3500-2900 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 1.25 inches long and is an exceptional example for the type. This esoteric piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the top to the bottom center, and there are two animals seen on the flat back side that were carved into the piece. The overall carving of this piece is very detailed and represents a high degree of workmanship, as this piece was produced at the very dawn of civilization when city-states were first formed. The two animals, seen on the back flat side, appear to be identical and served as a stamp and/or seal, and may have represented value in a transaction. This mint quality stamp seal/amulet appears to be a fox, as the head is very angular, along with the raised ears. ( For another analogous example see Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Ada Small Moore Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Seals", New York, Dec. 1991, no. 3, $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates. ) This piece was probably part of a necklace, and the vertical bow drilled hole allowed this piece to hang with other seals/amulets of this type. This translucent piece has some spotty mineral deposits, and these deposits can be seen within the eyes, and become darker when one looks through this piece into a lighted background. ( See attached photo. ) This eerie effect makes this piece look alive, and the deposits seen within the eyes may in part be original inlay. Only a skilled artist could achieve this visual effect. This exceptional piece is mounted on a custom plexiglas stand, can easily lift off the stand, and can be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price on Request
These two rare and superb carved wooden panels are French, and date to the late Gothic period, circa 1600-1700 A.D. These pieces are a matching pair, although they have slight differences. Both of these carved panels are approximately 7.8 inches wide by 17.75 inches high, and are mounted in frames that are approximately 11.75 inches wide by 28 inches high. These outer frames date circa 1800-1850, and were the mounting for the panels that were set into a hotel lobby in Paris, France. These panels were originally set into a private manor house that belonged to the Orlinski family in Normandy. The bulk of the Orlinski panels were sold at auction in San Francisco, CA., by Butterfield & Butterfield Co. in June 1996. Many of these panels, which were religious in nature, were identified as being produced by artisans who were employed in the area of Coutances, France, where the massive 13th century Gothic cathedral of Notre Dame was built. The panels seen here were finely carved and have great detail, and the condition of both panels is exceptional. These panels display two caryatids that are seen back to back, and are carved in high relief. The caryatids were known in antiquity as the priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, and were often seen as a draped female figure that supported an entablature. The figures seen on these two panels are part lion, with the lion's paw feet, part bird, with the detailed feathered wings, and part woman, with the female breasts and faces. The raised hair comb and luxuriant wavy hair is very detailed as well, and is an excellent mark that the artist that carved these pieces was very skilled. Ex: Orlinski collection, France. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre AD 1000 item #661705
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675
This superb red sandstone fragment is from central India and dates to the Post-Gupta period, circa 8th-9th Century A.D. This piece is approximately 16 inches high and is mounted on a custom metal stand. This piece may originally have been part of a stele and/or a temple. There is a section on the right side of this piece that is flat, and this side may have been the inner part of a doorway. There are also four smiling Nagas seen on this piece with intertwined serpent tails and cobra hoods above their heads. Their raised clasped hands are seen in the Anjali Mudra position, and they are positioned at an angle so that they view the person that would pass through the doorway. There is also an elaborate foliage pattern seen on the edge, and the overall design of this piece is very esoteric. There is an analogous piece that is seen in the Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Ullman Collection and is published in "Art of the Indian Subcontinent From Los Angeles Collections", Ward Ritchie Press, 1968. This piece may be a part of the same building and/or stele, as this piece also forms part of a door jam. This piece, and the piece offered here, are both extremely fine examples of ancient Indian art and are in superb condition with clear detailed carving. These carvings are highly spiritual, and were intended to protect the viewer, as this was the reason for the depiction of the Nagas. A nice heavy piece with a high degree of spiritual feeling. Ex: Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art", March, 1990. Ex: Private Los Angeles collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1027901
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265
This interesting piece is a carved jade pendant that is from the Costa Rican region, and dates circa 300 B.C.-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high, and is part of a complete "axe-god" pendant. This piece likely formed a complete piece that was approximately 4.25 to 4.5 inches high, and may have been string cut into three near equal sections. This beautiful dark green jade piece is the upper section of a complete pendant, and is in the form of an avian head. The dark green color is even throughout the entire piece, and is from a high quality section of the stone from which it was cut. This detailed jade head has superb workmanship, and has bow drilled eyes, wing design cuts seen on each side, and a bow drilled hole through the side which the wearer was able to use in order to suspend this piece as a pendant. This piece was worn by the elite as a "power" type piece, and appears to represent either parrots or owls as emphasized by the tufts as seen at the top of the head. This piece is analogous to two examples that are seen in "Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica", Detroit Institute of Art, Abrams Pub., 1981, no.24 and 26. (See attached photos.) This piece also has an unpolished "septum" that is seen at the back of this piece, and was a result of string cutting a stone into three seperate pieces in order to produce three pendants. (For this manufacturing process see, "Precolumbian Jade" by Frederick W. Lange, University of Utah Press, 1993, pp.270-274.) This piece also has some spotty light brown surface deposits that are seen in several low relief points of the piece. This piece is rare, as it was a segment from a complete "ax-god", and this complete and sacred "ax-god" was likely cut into three segments so that each piece could have been given to family members of the prior owner. The piece offered here, subsequently became a votive grave offering, and the "power" of this piece passed from one generation to another. This type of segmented votive piece was also known to have occurred with the Olmec, as evidenced by Olmec hard stone pieces that are published in "The Olmec World, Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, Abrams Inc. Pub., 1995, nos. 158 and 159. (The pieces illustrated are both jade masks that were string cut and/or broken into a section, and was then reworked and repolished. It is unknown whether these masks were broken accidentally or for a ritual purpose, but what is known, these pieces were valued as they were reworked and repolished. See attached photos.) The rare votive piece offered here was also reworked and repolished afer it was cut at the bottom, and this type of votive piece is seldom seen in the market, or in private/public collections. This piece is a superb example of Costa Rican jade. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. This piece can also be easily worn on a cord as well. Ex: Private Mass. collection. Ex: Arte Xibalba, Osprey, Fl. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon" or "cothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well, and are scarce in this "as found" condition. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,975
This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 11.5 and 13.5 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric period circa 750-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are conical in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. These beads have an attractive dark green patina, and are all in superb condition. These beads are strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, as well as being votive, and are now scarce in the market. As a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1208597
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,865
This scarce piece is a Mayan brownware tripod vessel, "Teotihuacan Type", that dates circa 250-450 A.D. This Mayan piece is classified as having "Teotihuacan" artistic style, and is of the type seen in "Pre-Columbian Art, The Morton D. May and The Saint Lewis Art Museum Collections" by L.A. Parsons, New York, 1980, Fig. 133. This superb piece is approximately 8.3 inches high by 12.4 inches in diameter, and is complete with some limited crack fill/repair. This piece also has some traces of red cinnabar in the low relief molded sections of the vessel, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There is a black polychrome band seen below the rim, and there are raised coffee bean symbols that are seen running around the vessel at the base of the bowl. This attractive brownware piece is supported by three hollow slab feet that show an identical trophy/death head molded design, and the bowl has a molded frieze that runs around the piece. This molded frieze is divided into three sections by incised bands, and each section has an identical impressed molded design that was repeated three times. This impressed molded design shows a Mayan ballplayer on one knee, and he is wearing a yoke around his waist, along with a helmet/headdress and other regalia. There also appears to be a speech-scroll seen running away from this figure as well. He is seen bouncing a large ball off his hip/yoke, and this large ball also appears to be depicted at the moment of impact. This figure may represent the Mayan Hero Twin "Xbalanque", who was the great mythic ballplayer in the Mayan "Popol Vuh". In addition, this impressed molded design shows a standing individual/ballplayer that is seen facing the ballplayer that is seen on one knee, and this standing individual/ballplayer has a skull-like old man facial design, and likely represents one of the Mayan Death Gods of Xibalba, which is the Mayan underworld. This standing Death God is seen holding a hanging object, and this may be a handstone, "manopla", which was used in the ballgame perhaps during the serve, or it may represent a squash, which represents a severed head of the other Hero Twin, "Hunahpu". This standing Death God may represent "God L", who was also one of the principle gods of the underworld, and was known as "Lord of the Underworld". The number three is also significant regarding the Mayan ballgame, as the Maya were thought to have played the game with three principle players on each side. It is interesting to note that this piece has three legs that each depict a trophy/death head, along with the three sections of the molded frieze which each have the three identical molded impressions as noted above. There is a total of nine molded impressions, three per section, seen within the molded frieze that runs around this piece, and the number nine is associated with the Hero Twins. (See "The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame", M. Whittington Ed., Thames and Hudson, New York, 2001, p.239, which also shows a scene which is very analogous to the scene seen on the piece offered here, and that is the Hero Twin "Xbalanque" on one knee hitting the ball with his yoke, and the standing "God L". See attached photo.) According to Linda Schele in "The Code of Kings", New York, 1998, p. 213: "Both sets of Twins (Hero Twins) confronted the Lords of Death in the ballgame, which was a symbolic form of warfare. The Hero Twins used the dance to defeat Death, and it was in the ballcourt that they resurrected their dead forebears. It was also in the ballcourt that the Maize Gods stayed after the successful Fourth Creation and the engendering of humanity. It is there that human beings must go to worship the Maize Gods." This piece was also likely ceremonial in nature, given the Mayan ballgame symbols, and may have held an offering such as a severed head, possibly from a ballplayer. The Mayan death head symbol seen on the legs of the vessel also support this theory, along with the fact that this type of piece is known as a votive offering vessel. The noted Mayan epigraphist, Dr. Mark Van Stone, has confirmed that the three legs seen on this vessel have: "a head on the leg that represents a generic trophy head" and, "his eye is closed, which suggests a captive decapitation, and his jaw is hidden by a scroll, a little like the head-variant of (Te)". This exceptional piece is scarce to rare, as most Mayan vessels of this type portray warriors and/or battle scenes, rather than a scene from the Mayan ballcourt. Another analogous vessel of this type that portrays a molded priest/warrior in flight is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 1991, no. 155. ($8,000.00-$10,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Donick Cary collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1260116
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare piece is a Minoan culture bronze double-ax, which dates Middle Minoan III-Late Minoan I Periods, circa 1700-1450 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches long by 4.1 inches high, and has an attractive even dark green/brown patina. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, some minute root marking, and is a complete and intact example which is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition. This powerful piece is a hammered bronze piece that is very thin, and is made from two sections that are riveted together with four rivets. These riveted sections also form a central horizontal hole that was used to mount a bronze or wooden rod. This piece is also a votive type piece, as it is made from thin sheet bronze, and is an imitation of a heavy bronze battle ax. The bronze with this piece is also thick enough so it does not bend easily, and the sheet bronze also appears to be nearly the same thickness as the known Cretan bronze helmets that date circa 8th-7th century B.C. These helmets also have minute rivets, and also have a two-part type construction as the votive bronze double-ax offered here. The Lydian word for "ax" is "labrys", as related by Plutarch. The word "labyrinth", derived from the word "labrys", was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the palaces in Crete, such as Knossos, and also referred to the "double-ax" symbol represented by the piece offered here. The symbol of the "double-ax" also always accompanies goddesses, and it seems that it was also the Minoan symbol of the beginning of the creation. This also explains why this piece is votive, and was offered in tombs and sacred places. It is also believed that this type of power piece served as a standard in religious shrines and temples. See F. Schachermeyer in "Die Minoische Kultur des Alten Kreta", 1990, pp. 161, 237, and 238.; and W.H.D. Rouse, "The Double Axe and the Labyrinth, The Journal of Hellenis Studies 21", 1901.; and John Chadwick, "The Mycenaean World", 1976. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora which dates to the 2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1113374
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675
This superb little gem is a Greek silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great in Babylon, circa 323 B.C. This coin is in superb to mint state in condition, weighs approximately 4.2 gms, and is perfectly centered on both sides. The obverse shows a portrait of Alexander the Great, facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, facing left, and is seen holding an eagle on his extended right arm. The name PHILIP is seen behind, and Philip III Arrhidaeus, half brother of Alexander was to share the throne with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king. The real power still lay behind the generals-Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolemy and others-who were all biding their time for power. The coin seen here likely was minted by Antigonos, who had control of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. Alexander is also seen as a god on the obverse of this coin, as the face has pronounced upturned eyes which signify Alexander as a deified god. This coin is a superb example for the type, and the artistic style of the obverse portrait of Alexander is very fine. Sear no.6750. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1247487
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.7 inches long by 2.5 inches high, and is nearly complete, save for some minor losses to upper right hand corner and upper border. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some heavier dark brown/green mineralization seen mostly on the back side of this piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and has small corner attachment holes, as this detailed plaque was woven into a fabric which formed an armored cuirass. This piece may have been fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and the armored cuirass that held the Roman bronze plaque offered here, also likely had additional duplicate plaques of this piece that were also fitted into the cuirass. This extremely rare Roman bronze plaque shows a group scene of armor, which includes a central image of a Greek type cuirass, a Greek Chalcidian type helmet, a Roman gladius type sword, and javelin spears behind. In addition, this central group of armor is flanked on each side with several different shield types which appear to be stacked on one another. The entire armor scene seen on this piece may also depict a "trophy scene", which entailed the captured enemy armor being stacked and mounted on a display stand. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most examples are fragmentary, and are not as complete as this exceptional example. Ancient Roman plaque armor is rare to extremely rare, as the majority of Roman body armor was constructed with several sectional bronze pieces which attached to leather and/or fabric, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This type of piece is analogous to the repousse bronze plaque seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 87. (See attached photo showing a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of Roman armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipment", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted on a custom wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This unique piece is a stamped plaque that is made from lead. This piece is Italic, and dates circa mid 16th to the late 17th century A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 2.7 inches wide, by 2.1 inches high, and by .15 inches thick. The shape of this piece is oval, and as such, was likely an inlay for a furniture piece or a box, rather than part of a large pendant for a necklace and/or pectoral. The backside of this piece is flat, and this piece was made in the same fashion as a Roman bronze sestertius or Renaissance medallion coin would have been made, with a carved die that was hand struck into the prepared heated lead flan. This method of manufacture allowed one to make several examples of this piece, however, the piece offered here may be the only recorded example, as our research has not found any other pieces. In fact, all of these lead plaques are very rare, as lead is very soft and is easy to damage, melts very easily, and can simply be easily used later on to make other objects. The piece offered here has a light brown patina with a thin oxidized crust over the outer surface, moreover, the condition of this piece is superb with no major tears, dents, or scraps as lead is a very soft material. There are also micro black dendrites which indicate that this piece has been buried for quite some time. There is a small hole seen at the top which may have held an attachment pin. This piece shows a seated, virile figure that is seen half draped, and is seen holding a round object in his extended right hand which may be an apple. This seated figure appears to be examining and looking at the round object that he is seen holding up in front of himself, and there is a strong possibility that the figure is the Trojan prince Paris, who is contemplating as to whom he should award the prize. According to Greek myth, it was Paris who was chosen by the gods to decide which of the three goddesses - Juno, Minerva, or Venus - was the fairest, and the prize was an apple. Venus won the prize who in turn awarded Paris the mortal Helen, and this triggered the Trojan War. The Trojan prince Aeneas, subsequently fled the ruins of Troy to found the city of Rome, as praised by the Roman poet Virgil, who prophesied a "new golden age" as founded by Augustus, the first or Roman emperors. Virgil, Horace, and Propertius, who are considered the greatest writers in Roman literature, all embraced Augustus' propaganda campaign in creating the "myth of Augustus", which fostered the idea that Augustus was the one chosen by the gods to preside over the new empire. This literary propaganda campaign legitimized Augustus' hold on power after the bloody civil wars, and in the same context, there are several Roman works of art that served the same purpose. The piece offered here points back to the founding of Rome, and another rare Roman work of art that is considered by many academics to fit into this category is the Portland Vase, and the seated figure seen on the Portland Vase known as "Figure E" is thought to be Paris as well. The artistic style of "Figure E" is also very analogous to the seated figure seen on the piece offered here, as both are seated, both are nude except for drapery that falls over the thighs, both have a virile muscular build, and both have the same type of hair style. (See "Glass of the Caesars" by Donald Harden, The British Museum Pub., London, 1987, p. 59.) The piece offered here was also examined by Dr. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, who dated this piece, and in addition, he thought there was a strong possibility that the maker of this piece saw the Portland Vase. The seated figure seen on the piece offered here is seen centered in front of a fountain with a lion's head spout. There are also architectural elements seen at the back of the seated figure, including a building with a round dome that may be a representation of the Pantheon. The overall scene may be one set in the Campus Martius (Field of Mars), and is the location where Augustus was cremated and where his Mausoleum was built. The piece offered here is an important work of Italic Renaissance art, according to Dr. Fischer-Bossert, but this piece is obviously in need of further academic study. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private English collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1246377
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875
This mint quality piece is a large Greek "Messapian" column-krater that dates circa 4th century B.C. This appealing and large scale piece is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, and is mint quality with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a dark brown glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this piece has two lines seen on the body above the raised footed base, and has a dark brown line pattern seen on the upper flat rim. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown glaze seen on the majority of these large scale pieces is mostly worn away. The reason for this, is that the dark brown glaze is very thin, and was applied simply as a "wash type" glaze over the light tan clay before it was fired in the kiln. However, the attractive dark brown glaze, seen on the exceptional piece offered here, is mostly intact. This type of "Messapian" piece is also much rarer than the more common Greek "Apulian" and "Lucanian" column-krater types, and according to A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18: "The shapes used for South Italian vases in the fifth century were largely derived from Attic models (see Glossary of Shapes); later, some local forms were introduced, amoung which the most characteristic are the nestoris or trozzella (in Lucanian, e.g., cat. nos. 4, 10, and 11, and Apulian, e.g., cat. no. 134), which seems to have been of native, probably Messapian origin, and the bail-amphora (in Campanian e.g., cat. no. 90, where it goes back to the black-figure prototypes of the sixth century). Many shapes are common to all fabrics (e.g., bell-and calyx-kraters, lekanides, hydriai, lebetes gamikoi, oinochoai, skyphoi); for others there were decided local preferences. Thus the loutrophoros and phiale (dish) are confined to Apulia; the volute-krater, column-krater, Panathenaic amphora, pelike, kantharos, and rhyton are rarely found outside of Apulia and Lucania; the neck amphora, bottle, and skyphoid pyxis are common only in the western fabrics." The piece offered here is also likely votive, and this also explains it's mint quality condition. The bottom is also closed, and this vessel may have held a votive offering such as grain for use in the afterlife. This piece has some heavy white calcite deposits and some minute root marking, as this attractive column-krater is in mint "as found" condition. This piece is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy near and around ancient Taranto on the Adriatic coast. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery in southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: