Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1234658
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an attractive Roman bronze caduceus staff that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This type of piece was a principle attribute for the Graeco-Roman god Hermes/Mercury, and his other attributes was his winged hat and money bag. This god was the Roman god of communication, and he assisted many of his fellow gods in delivering messages. This god also was the protector of shepherds, athletics, literature, invention, and commerce in general. The caduceus was originally a magician's wand and was also attributed to the messenger god Hermes. Myth tells us that Hermes threw his wand at two snakes fighting and they became fixed to it. Since Hermes was the teacher of Eros, the caduceus could be interpreted as representing the pedagogical qualities of Eloquence and Reason. The caduceus later became an emblem of peace, wealth, and prosperity. The insignia of the caduceus now symbolizes a physician and represents the modern medical establishment. The piece seen here has a twisted base rod which is comprised of two entwined serpents which split and form two hoops, and they then come together at the top. There are attached wings seen in the middle which form a junction point for the serpent bodies. This piece may have been held by a bronze figurine of Mercury, and/or may have been a votive offering, as this piece was made as a separate piece. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and there is some chasing detail seen on the snake bodies. An analogous example approximately 4.7 inches high was sold in Bonham's Antiquities, London, April 2006, no. 146 for 1,680 Pounds ($2,769.00), 1200-1500 Pound estimates. This piece comes with a custom clear and black Plexiglas stand. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1143948
Apolonia Ancient Art
$585.00
This attractive piece is a Roman glass tear drop vial that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.25 inches high, and is mint quality with no minute cracks and/or chips. This piece has an extremely thin upper lip which was rounded and folded out, and has a small section on one side that was formed into a small spout. This design allowed a great deal of control in pouring a fine liquid. This piece also has an attractive light blue multi-colored iridescence, which covers a light blue colored glass. This piece also has a transition point where the neck meets the main body of the vessel. For the type see "Ancient Glass in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History", by Andrew Oliver, 1980, no. 89. This piece also stands upright, and fits into a custom plexiglas and wooden display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1995. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1156195
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This rare piece is a Greek silver bracelet that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This intact piece has an approximate 1.25 inch inner diameter, a 1.5 inch outer diameter, and the hoop is .125 inches in diameter. Given the inner diameter of this piece, this piece was likely made for a young child or infant. The weight of this rare piece is approximately 17.3 gms, and it is possible that this piece may have been made from an ancient Greek silver coin, such as a tetradrachm of Alexander the Great, which had a norm of 17.4 gms (Attic weight standard.). This attractive piece has snake head terminals, which have round punched eyes and minute dotted details on the top and side of each head. The exceptional workmanship of this ancient Greek silver piece is very detailed, including the reptilian designed nose and mouth of each head. The design of the snake head terminals is also very animated, and the snake heads appear to be very alive. (A pair of child's gold snake bracelets is seen in ""Coming of Age in Ancient Greece: Images of Childhood from the Classical Past", by Jenifer Neils and John Oakley, Yale University Press, 2003, no. 121, p. 304.) The snake is an apotropaic motif in ancient Greek art, and this piece was designed as a "protector" type piece, and it should not be a surprise that this type of design occurs in children's jewelry. The snake head designed terminals for a bracelet of this type, is a common Greek design which is seen from the Geometric period, down to the mid Hellenistic Period, but what is not common, is that the piece offered here is not a bracelet for an adult. The piece offered here may also be Thracian, and in addition, it may have been a votive example for an infant as well. This is also alluded to in Euripides play, "Ion" (1427-1432), in which Ion's mother Creusa places golden snakes around the baby's neck before exposing him. This rare piece has an attractive dark gray patina, with some spotty dark black mineral deposits. This piece comes with a custom display stand, and can easily be removed as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1102815
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Byzantine bronze cross that has a nice silver inlaid design. This piece dates circa 4th-7th century A.D., and is approximately 1.9 inches high by 1.9 inches high by 1/16th inch thick. This piece has an attractive silver inlaid design which has a detailed "circle-and-line" type design. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some light green and red surface deposits. There are also five small holes seen in this piece which were likely used to sew this piece into a garment. This piece is in superb condition, and could easily be worn as a pendant today. This piece also comes with a custom black plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #821520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This splendid Greek Apulian squat lekythos dates circa mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This piece has a draped woman standing to the right and she is seen looking back to the left, holding a white dotted decorative plate in her right hand, and holding a white dotted decorative wreath in her left hand. The drapery of the standing woman has very fine detail, and is better than most examples. There is a circle dot behind her body and a large palmette on the back side below the handle. For another piece of this type with a single draped woman, see Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 87 ($600.00-$900.00 estimates, $3,438.00 realized.) The piece offered here is intact, save for the spout that has been re-attached. There are spotty white calcite deposits and the overall condition is superb. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Sculpture : Pre AD 1000 item #1150907
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive piece is a Roman marble that is in the form of a human hand that is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long by 2.2 inches high. This piece is nearly a complete example of a human hand, as it is broken in the upper wrist, and is a fragment from a larger statue. This piece has a light tan patina, has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and is a superb qaulity marble. The hand is seen holding a purse and/or moneybag, which is also an attribute of the Greek god Hermes/Roman god Mercury, as Hermes and Mercury were both a god of merchants that presided over trade. The hand also appears to be that of a young man, as the fingers are slender and the upper part of the hand appears to be somewhat feminine in nature. The subsequent Roman creations of Hermes were often modeled after the early Greek 4th century B.C. creation of Hermes by Praxiteles, which was found at Olympia in 1877. (For a description of this piece, see "A Handbook of Greek Art", by Gisela Richter, Phaidon Press Limited, Oxford, 1987, p. 144.) This prototype statue of Hermes by Praxiteles is a young man, with slight feminine features, and is portrayed with a convention of classical Greek art that portrayed the gods and goddesses as being eternally young. The marble piece offered here also has these features which not only point this fragment as likely being attributed to Hermes, but also illustrates an earlier Greek convention of art. (Another example approximately 2.75 inches long was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 312. 700-1,000 Pound estimates, 1,500 Pound/$2,427.00 realized.) The piece offered here is a nice scarce piece with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian red-figure plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 6.4 inches in diameter by 1.7 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the TPS Painter, and this workshop produced several of the best Apulian painters for the period. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, but more importantly, this vessel has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this appealing piece has a head of a woman facing left, who is seen wearing a sakkos, large earrings painted white, and a white dotted necklace. There is a plate seen at the front of the bust, and a palmate pattern seen behind. The plate may also be a symbol that denoted the TPS Painter. In addition, there are two triple dotted patterns, along with two ivy leaf symbols seen within the field. There is a wave pattern, an ivy leaf pattern, and a orange and black line pattern that is seen framing the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a dark black reserve seen at the bottom, along with a footed base. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel. This piece is analogous to the example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. (This analogous Christie's piece, also attributed to the TPS Painter, was offered with another Apulian plate attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the Painter of Zurich 2660. Both of these plates are also of nearly the same size and quality as the example offered here. Both of these pieces were offered together as one lot, and had a $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimate, and both pieces together realized $8,750.00. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the TPS Painter, Darius-Underworld workshop, see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258774
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This ancient Greek coin is an Aigina silver stater that dates circa 456-404 B.C. This coin is approximately 20 mm wide, weighs 12.3 gms, and is in extremely fine condition. This coin also has a natural light gray patina with some spotty light dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This beautiful coin has a land turtle/tortoise seen on the obverse, and the reverse has an incuse "skew" type pattern that has five separate boxes and thick division lines. The land turtle is seen in extremely high relief, and is well centered on the flan, which is a feature not often seen on this coin type, as one can see the entire creature on this coin. This coin usually shows the turtle with a leg, tail, or head seen off the flan, because the obverse die was not often well centered, as the turtle design with extremely high relief takes up most of the room seen on the flan's obverse. The detail is also extremely fine, as one can see the minute dotted scales on the legs and the individual segments of the shell design. The turtle design is a civic symbol and also represents the Greek island of Aigina, which was a place of some importance in the 5th and 4th century B.C. Aigina was eclipsed by Athens after the Persian wars, and never regained her former position as one of the greatest trading states of the ancient Greek World. The island was captured by Athens in 456 B.C., and this is the period when the coin offered here was first minted. The coin type also changed, from a smooth-shelled sea turtle design, to the land turtle design seen here. Another analogous example of the same grade and dies was sold May 7th, 2014 by Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger, Auction 298, no. 264 for Euro 1,900 ($2,647.99), Euro 1440 estimate. SNG COP 516f. Sear 2600. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1163826
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price on Request
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian cut glass bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.8 inches in diameter, and is slightly larger than most examples of this type. This mint quality exceptional piece also has one of the best patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has a thick honey brown encrusted patina that is seen over a pale green glass, and there are attractive spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits seen on the outer surface. This thick-walled piece has seven registers that run around the vessel from top to bottom, and there is one large circle at the bottom that forms the base. The top five registers have a "diamond-cut" pattern, and the bottom two registers have a "circular-cut" pattern. The entire vessel was cut from one solid block of glass, and was skillfully cut with the patterns that are seen on the outer surface of the vessel. The patterns are all nearly the same size, and a great deal of skill was required to produce a cut vessel of this type. A much higher degree of skill was needed to produce a cut vessel of this type, relative to the numerous Roman blown glass vessels. In addition, this beautiful piece is rarer than the more common examples that entirely have "circular-cut" pattern registers, as opposed to this rarer vessel that has "diamond-cut" pattern registers. A slightly smaller analogous Sasanian bowl was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 396 (L4,500.00-L6,700.00 pounds estimates, L5,000.00 pounds realized.) An analogous bowl of this type and size is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New york, 1977, p. 159, no.82.). One of the finest vessels of it's type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. and is a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are an added plus towards the value of the piece. The patina is absolutely gorgeous and is dark green with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is also very desirable, and is another added plus towards the value of this piece. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze and was hammered into shape. This piece was finished with exceptional repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "classical period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian empire) deep bowl. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. This piece is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter by 3 inches high, is thick walled, and is a large example. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece was also probably used for formal wine drinking known as symposia. A plexiglas stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,465.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine condition. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1224144
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Greek gold diadem that dates circa mid to late 4th century B.C. This piece is extremely large for the type, and is approximately 13.75 inches long by 3.9 inches high. This piece is complete and is in superb to mint condition, with no repairs and/or restoration. This piece also has some minute mineral deposits and root marking. This piece also has detailed and intricate repousse floral decoration, with a central anthemion composed of an elaborate palmette with emerging spiral tentrils that run from the center to both ends of this striking piece. This piece has a pediment design, and along with the central anthemion design, are architectural elements that are seen on sacred Greek temples and monuments. The ends of this piece are pierced with two holes so that it could be fitted with a cord and tied to the forehead. This piece may have been used in ceremony, and was also likely a funeral offering that represents eternal life with the symbolic decorative floral elements. This piece was made by pressing a single piece of sheet gold into a design carved intaglio in a die, and one large die was used to produce the whole design in one process, rather than one or more smaller dies being used sequentially. This piece is analogous to another example seen in "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World" by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994, no. 44., but the piece offered here is a much larger example, and is rarely seen in this x-large size. This beautiful piece has a high degree of eye appeal, as it has a brilliant gold color, and comes with a custom black plexiglas display case. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #600190
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring". This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. and it was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom. This piece was mounted on a war chariot and was used as a guide for the horse reins, as the reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer more control over the horses. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high by 2.5 inches wide, and is large enough for two sets of reins to pass through. The design of this piece, with the raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins. There was also a mounting peg that went up the inside bottom, as this piece has a recess hole. This piece was made during the period when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 B.C. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a spear and shield, was new to the Romans as a weapon of war. Chariots were used by the Romans as a method of transport and not as a war machine, and not even the Celts of Gaul used a war chariot. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried the warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the tribe whose Gaulish capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooden frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology and the piece seen here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This piece has a graceful shape, has a nice dark green patina, and is complete and intact. (See Bonhams Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no.339 for a comparative example. 2500-3500 pounds estimate.) This piece is also mounted on a custom clear plexiglas/marble stand. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: