Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #859366
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This nice Egyptian vessel is an aryballos which probably held a cosmetic and/or a precious unguent. This piece dates to the Late Period, circa 550-330 B.C., and is approximately 2.5 inches high. This intact piece has a nice dark brown patina with some minute wear on the outer rim, which indicates this piece was used in antiquity and was not a votive object. This piece also has two small lug handles which allows one to easily grip this vessel. This piece is also very translucent when it is back lit and/or when it is placed outside in the daylight. This piece sits on a custom marble black base and an old French collector tag is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: S. Linde collection, Berlin, Germany. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #593672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This extremely fine Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece circa 460-430 BC. This coin weighs 3 grams and has a light gray patina. The obverse has a facing bull, and the reverse, features the head of Artemis with the hair bound with a fillet. The bull probably represents a sacrificial bull. The letters of Phokis are seen around the head. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,765.00
This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is likely from the Lambayeque Valley, Peru, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is a silver with added copper metal combination with an applied coat of spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1178207
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This piece is a Moche ceramic stirrup-jar that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This interesting piece is approximately 9.75 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and has some light brown burnishing. This piece has light orange/red highlights over a cream colored background, and is a very detailed Moche fineline ceramic. This lively piece shows two detailed and animated "Strombus Monsters", which are seen facing right and are seen on each side of the vessel. These composite creatures are seen wearing a conch shell, from which they are seen emerging, and they display a lively open mouthed pose. These creatures have a striped pelage, a tapering tail, a long-spined main that runs down the length of it's back, and four legs with claws. There are also three eyes that extend from the front of the head. According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.63: "On the snout of the monster are antenna-like objects clearly derived from the land snail. There is a likely explanation for the combination of features on this animal. Since conch shells (Strombus galeatus) were imported from Ecuador, the Moche people probably never saw the creature living inside. They may, however, have made an analogy between the creature they thought inhabited the conch shell and the land snail, which is native to the north coast of Peru." There is an analogous comparable to this vessel that is seen in Sotheby's New York, Arts of Africa, Oceania & the Americas, May 2003, no. 207. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1978-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL document from Gutachten Lab., no. 7579125, dated 11/19/1979.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226436
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 A.D., is approximately 35 mm wide, and grades superb (EF+) to FDC (Mint State). This piece has on the (Obv.) the beautiful draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face of Artemis is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style than what is normally seen, and the young dainty features of the young Artemis have a high degree of eye appeal. The outer decorative elements, seen on the obverse, are seven semi-circles with the Macedonian royal star within, and two dots between each semi-circle. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows a club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. No coins were issued from circa 168-158 B.C., but between circa 158-148 B.C., the coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at its capital, Amphipolis. The second region (DEUTERAS) minted a small number of coins at its capital, Thessalonica. The third region with its capital, Pella, and the fourth region with its capital, Heraclea Lynci, did not issue coinage. In 148 B.C. the four regions were reunited as a Roman province, and no silver coinage was struck for another half century. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin type with superb artistic style and grade are now scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional Greek coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7. SNG Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1040039
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a large Greek pitcher that dates to the Greek Geometric period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high by 8.5 inches in diameter. This superb piece is a light gray terracotta and is near mint quality. This intact vessel also has no noticeable chips and/or abrasions which are usually associated with ceramics of this type. This attractive piece also has nice light to dark brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. There is a single strap handle and trefoil mouth which allowed water and/or wine to be poured in a controlled manner. This piece also sits on a ring base that stabilizes this vessel a great deal, and together with the trefoil spout, are design innovations that represent a huge leap in ancient Greek ceramic design/production. This piece is scarce in this size and near mint condition, and is a very attractive early Greek light gray ceramic. Another analogous example nearly the same size is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1991, no.245. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1047632
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This cute piece is a Colima standing warrior that dates circa 150 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches high and is intact, with no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a light red/orange terracotta, and has some minute dark black spotty dendrite deposits. This piece is also a whistle, with an opening at the top and at the back of the hollowed head. The whistle is well made, and makes quite a sharp high-pitched tone. This piece was likely ceremonial, and may have been part of a group ceremony. This type of piece is also known as a "protector" type piece, and is thought to protect the deceased in the afterlife. The standing warrior seen here is nude, and is seen holding the full body length shield with both hands. The shield is leaning against the upper body of the warrior, and only the upper half of his face/head is seen peeking above the upper end of the shield. The design of the curved shield protects a great deal of his body, and it is probable that this stance illustrates the type of warfare that was conducted by the ancient Colima. It is unknown if he is part of a shield wall with many warriors, as was the case of the phalanx formation that was deployed by the ancient Greeks, or if he is simply depicted as an individual warrior in combat. The warrior is also seen wearing a turkey tail feather crest/helmet, and this makes him seem larger than life and more imposing. (A turkey whistle with analogous designed tail feathers, as the crest design seen here, is seen in "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico" by Michael Kan, Los Angeles County Art Museum, 1989, no.169.) An interesting piece that has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Yvette Arnold collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Fl. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278900
Apolonia Ancient Art
$9,675.00
This rare Roman bronze figurine is a standing gladiator that dates circa 1st-early 2nd century A.D. This bronze figurine is approximately 3.4 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This animated figurine is a standing gladiator, who is seen raising his left arm to the brim of his helmet, and has his left leg raised as if it is resting on his adversary. His raised left arm may be a signal either to spare or kill his adversary who is perhaps laying injured on the ground. The animated pose of the gladiator depicted here, with his raised arm and hand signal, is scarce to rare relative to Roman bronze gladiator figurines of this type, and is seldom seen on the market. The gladiator depicted here is also a "Murmillo" type, as he is seen wearing a "Cassis Crista", which is a broad-rimmed helmet based on the prior Greek Boeotian type, and the large helmet seen here has an enclosed double face visor, a forward raised crested plume, rounded eye visors, and decorative minute fish scale elements that are seen on the outer bowl. The helmet also has some minute details showing the double opening for the face visor, and this helmet is classified as the "Pompeii G Type", which is rarely seen on Roman bronze gladiatorial figurines as the more common "Berlin G Type". Early gladiatorial helmets, including the ones found at Pompeii, had round eye apertures for the eyes, and were often screened with removable round or semi-circular grating plates, and in addition, the visor grating also consisted of two halves that joined at the front, forming a vertical rib as seen on the exceptional example offered here. The helmet details noted above, relative to the "Pompeii G Type", are seldom seen on Roman bronzes of this type, and is another feature that makes this piece a very desirable example. This figurine is also seen wearing an arm guard on his right arm which is known as a "Manica", which was usually made of thick cotton quilt, leather, and some metal alloys. This gladiator is also seen holding a short sword in his right hand known as a "Gladius", and protective greaves on both shins. In addition, his right leg is seen wrapped with a protective covering which was used to kick at his adversary, and he is wearing a wide leather belt known as a "Balteus". This figurine also appears to be bare chested as well. There is also a palm branch "Palma" seen on his back side, and this was an award for victory in the arena. On receiving his awards, the gladiator made a lap of honor around the arena, waving his palm branch. (See "Gladiator: Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Osprey Pub., United Kingdom, 2009.) The name "Murmillo" is derived from "Mormylos", meaning "seafish", and is sometimes spelled "Myrmillo". This name also alludes to the fish-scale design seen on the outer bowl of the helmet seen here. The "Murmillo" usually fought the "Thraex" or the "Hoplomachus", with whom he shared some of the equipment (notibly the arm guards, the all-enclosing helmet, and the dangerous "Gladius" short sword). The "Murmillo" fighting style was best suited for a man with large muscular arms and strong heavy shoulders that were needed to carry the weight of his shield and sword. Men who played the "Murmillo" were usually shorter and more muscular than most gladiators. The "Murmillo" depended on his strength and endurance to survive the battle against foes who were lighter armed and were suited for attacking. The figurine seen here also appears to be a short, muscular individual. The piece offered here is complete, save for the lower feet that are broken off, and this may have been done as this piece may have been a votive offering, and the breaking of the lower feet would keep the magic and spirit of the figurine in the grave. There also appears to be a shield hanging under the left arm, and a small fragment of this is missing. Overall, the condition of this piece is superb, and has nice detail with a nice even dark green patina, with minute spotty red highlights. (An analogous piece, without the minute detail that the piece offered here displays, was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2003, lot. 13. Approximately 3.1 inches high, $3,400.00-$5,100.00 estimates, $5,593.00 realized.) The piece offered here has also been mounted on a custom display stand, and is a rare type seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is generous in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1102815
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Byzantine bronze cross that has a nice silver inlaid design. This piece dates circa 4th-7th century A.D., and is approximately 1.9 inches high by 1.9 inches high by 1/16th inch thick. This piece has an attractive silver inlaid design which has a detailed "circle-and-line" type design. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some light green and red surface deposits. There are also five small holes seen in this piece which were likely used to sew this piece into a garment. This piece is in superb condition, and could easily be worn as a pendant today. This piece also comes with a custom black plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #902203
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare Mayan carved bottle dates to the early Classic period, circa 300-400 A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and is a light brown terracotta with dark brown highlights. This highly important piece is divided into three segments, and as a whole, displays the three Mayan glyphs that represent the "Palenque Triad", gods GI, GII, and GIII. This trio of gods were celebrated as divine ancestors by the kings of Palenque, and this is the principle reason why these three gods have been labeled the "Palenque Triad". The piece offered here may be from the Palenque region, and it is certainly from the Peten region, as the artistic style of the carved glyphs place it in this region which is modern day Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico. The artistic style of the deep carving seen on this piece may even be earlier than circa 300 A.D., and may represent the earliest glyphs that represent these three gods, which would make them late Protoclassic period, circa 200-300 A.D. The GII god glyph, otherwise known as "God K", has elements that are analogous to the Protoclassic glyph seen on Abaj Takalik Stela 5. (See "The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and The Maya", by Mary Miller and Carl Taube, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1993, p. 131.) GI rarely appears on Mayan painted pottery, and is associated with Venus and the sun, and likely represents one of the Mayan "Hero Twins". He has a shark's tooth, square eyes, scalloped eyebrows, and a shell earflare. GII, known as "God K", "Bolon Dzacab", and the "Flare God" has a forehead with a smoking celt or torch, a mirror head, and serpent-headed foot. This god is associated with the accession of Mayan royalty and royal self-inflicted bloodletting. GIII is associated with the "Baby Jaguar" god, the "Water-lily Jaguar" god, and one of the "Hero Twins". He has a "kin" sign on his cheek or forehead, a squint eye, and a Roman nose. The glyphs seen on the piece offered here all have elements of the above gods that are seen within the glyphs itself, and are seldom seen together on one vessel. In addition, each glyph has a central eye that is denoted with a small incised line design, which is slightly different for each eye seen within the glyph, and this minute incised eye detail was probably the last decorative element that was added to the piece by this skilled Mayan artist/scribe. This piece may also have contained red cinnabar, as traces of this compound are seen within the vessel and some low relief points of the glyphs. The red cinnabar was used by the Maya to preserve the departed, and royal tombs were often coated with this substance. The piece offered here was also hand carved, and a mold was not used to create the design, as is often the case with small Mayan bottles and flasks of this type. This piece is extremely rare, if not unique, and Mayan carved and painted vessels with the complete "Palenque Triad" are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Chuck Warren collection, Miami, Fl. (1970's) Ex: Erasmo Toledo collection, Miami, Fl. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258774
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This ancient Greek coin is an Aigina silver stater that dates circa 456-404 B.C. This coin is approximately 20 mm wide, weighs 12.3 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF-/EF). This coin also has a natural light gray patina with some spotty light dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This beautiful coin has a land turtle/tortoise seen on the obverse, and the reverse has an incuse "skew" type pattern that has five separate boxes and thick division lines. The land turtle is seen in extremely high relief, and is well centered on the flan, which is a feature not often seen on this coin type, as one can see the entire creature on this coin. This coin usually shows the turtle with a leg, tail, or head seen off the flan, because the obverse die was not often well centered, as the turtle design with extremely high relief takes up most of the room seen on the flan's obverse. The detail is also extremely fine, as one can see the minute dotted scales on the legs and the individual segments of the shell design. The turtle design is a civic symbol and also represents the Greek island of Aigina, which was a place of some importance in the 5th and 4th century B.C. Aigina was eclipsed by Athens after the Persian wars, and never regained her former position as one of the greatest trading states of the ancient Greek World. The island was captured by Athens in 456 B.C., and this is the period when the coin offered here was first minted. The coin type also changed, from a smooth-shelled sea turtle design, to the land turtle design seen here. Another analogous example of the same grade and dies was sold May 7th, 2014 by Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger, Auction 298, no. 264 for Euro 1,900 ($2,647.99), Euro 1440 estimate. SNG COP 516f. Sear 2600. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #593674
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This mint state silver tetrobol (four obols) was minted in northern Greece in the fortress city of Olynthos. This quality piece was minted circa 420-400 BC and is an early issue for the mint. The obverse has Apollo wearing a wreath and the reverse features his lyre. The name of Olynthos runs around the lyre. Olynthos was the center of the Chalkidian League and issued a series of coins with beautiful heads of Apollo. This classical period coin shows the early head of Apollo for the series, which is known as the "severe style". This style also best represents archaic period Greek sculpture. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: