Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price on Request
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, accession no. N-110. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #782558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This nice Greek ceramic is cup that is intact and it is an attractive form. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek art from southern Italy and Greek art from Attica (mainland Greece). This piece was produced circa 375-350 B.C. and is a glossy blackware with matt pinkish red designs. Xenon ware usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. This piece has a key pattern that runs around the center of the vessel, with chevron lines above. The condition of this intact piece in mint, and has no minute breaks and/or chips. The key design is missing in sections, and this is common, as the paint was often added after the ceramic was fired and/or was a thin application. This piece has not been over painted as well. There are some spotty white calcite deposits, and some root marking. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and is a superb example for the type. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1231949
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian blown and molded bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high by 3.7 inches in diameter, and is an exceptional example for the type. This exceptional mint quality piece also has one of the best "as found" patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has attractive thick encrusted spotty dark brown and muti-colored iridescent mineral deposits, which is seen over a pale green glass. This thick-walled piece has an even smooth surface, and pieces of this type were also cut with diamond and/or round pattern registers. This piece was skillfully blown into a mold, and this also explains why the side wall of this beautiful vessel has a uniform shape and has a gradual rounded surface. The mold was then removed, and the piece was then removed from the attached metal rod at the base after it cooled. A "tang" or "pontil" mark can still be seen on the outer bottom base of the piece. A much higher skill was required to form a vessel of this type, relative to the more common and numerous Roman "free blown" examples which were not mold made. An analogous Sasanian bowl of this type with cut registers is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New York, 1977, p. 159, no. 82.). This piece is one of the finest example's of it's type, as it has a natural and beautiful patina in it's scarce "as found" mint condition. Ex: Manhattan Galleries, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #694678
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This rare Greek bronze ram dates from the Geometric period, circa 750 B.C. This charming piece is intact and is approximately 1.75 inches high by 1.7 inches long. This piece has a nice dark green patina and has spotty light brown/white mineral deposits. This piece is a standing ram, which is a much rarer type than the more often seen standing horse types for the period. The ram for the ancient Greeks represented vitality and wealth, was a favourite sacrificial animal, and was often associated with Hermes, patron deity of shepherds, travellers, and tradesmen. This association with Hermes is a strong indicator that this piece was probably a votive offering in some Greek sanctuary. (For an analogous designed piece see "More Animals in Ancient Art From the Leo Mildenberg Collection", by Kozloff, Arielle and Mitten, David Gordon, Verlag Philipp Von Zabern pub., Mainz, Germany 1986, no.53. The example noted here also has an extended tail, tapered body, and square shoulders as the piece offered here. For another example, see "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XII, 2001, no. 52. Said to be from Thessaly, circa 8th century B.C., 2 inches long. Listed at $4,750.00. Ex: Spencer Churchill collection. ) The complete piece offered here was cast as one solid piece, as were the other two examples noted above, and was made to stand by itself which it does. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1290357
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This interesting piece is a Mayan "Copador" bowl that dates circa 600-900 A.D. The term "Copador" is a blend of "Copan" and El Salvador", which refer to both of these regions. This piece is approximately 8.2 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and has vibrant dark red, orange, and black colors. This piece also has some attractive and extensive root marking, and some spotty black and brown mineral deposits. Overall, this piece is in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece also has four pairs of seated chiefs, who are seen facing a mythical animal that closely resembles a dog. Each of these mythical animals have a speaking scroll that comes forth from it's mouth, and appear to have a conversation with their facing seated chiefs. There is a dark red band seen at the upper rim, and the inside of this interesting vessel has four "Glyph Groups" that are seen on the inner rim, along with a red banded "Mat" symbol that is seen on the inner bottom surface. This "Mat" symbol, which is also described as a "JAL" symbol, is a Mayan symbol that denotes royalty, and also referred to finely-woven garments worn by royalty. This bowl likely was owned by an important individual, and Mayan bowls of this type may each have had an individual purpose as an offering in the tomb of an important individual. (For the "JAL" sign see: "Reading Maya Art", by Andrea Stone and Marc Zender, Thames and Hudson, 2011, p. 81.) In addition, the four "Glyph Groups" seen on the inner rim have two groups that contain the Mayan glyph symbol for "13", as denoted by three dots and two bars. The Maya worshipped the thirteen gods of the Upper World, who ruled over the thirteen "layers" or "skies" into which the Upper World was divided. The third "Glyph Group" is a glyph with a speaking scroll, and the fourth "Glyph Group" are two identical glyphs that are seen one above the other. Overall, this is a very interesting Mayan bowl in excellent condition that has glyphs that appear to have meaning and/or are partly decipherable, and are not purely "pseudo-glyphs", as is the case as seen on most bowls of this type. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1980's Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1169806
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This large piece is a "Veracruz" culture standing priest, Remojadas type, that dates from the Classic period, circa 450-650 A.D. This piece is approximately 22.5 inches high, and easily stands by itself on a custom wooden stand. This piece is of an artistic style, known as "Remojadas", which is the name of a particular archaeological site, although objects in closely related styles actually come from a number of different sites in Veracruz. The name "Remojadas" thus refers to objects from south-central Veracruz, generally from the Classic-period. This piece is also known as a "Xipe-Toltec" type priest, as he portrays the god in costume. The "Xipe-Toltec" cult flourished along the Gulf Coast of modern day Mexico during the Classic and early Postclassic periods before gaining a prominent place in the Aztec pantheon, probably as a result of the subsequent Aztec domination of the Gulf Coast in the mid-15th century. Most Xipe figures vividly depict a human inside a flayed skin of another man, and this god was known as "Our Lord the Flayed One". According to Charles Phillips in "Aztec and Maya", Lorenz Pub., London, 2007, p. 62: "Victims killed in honour of Xipe Totec, the god of planting and vegetation, were shot with arrows so that their blood flowed into the earth like life-giving waters. Indeed, the Aztecs called human blood "chalchiuatl" (precious water). The corpse was then flayed and a priest would wear the skin in honour of the god. The rite was a celebration of the splitting of seeds that makes possible the growth of new vegetation each spring." Mary Miller and Karl Taube in "Ancient Mexico and the Maya", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1993, p. 188 also add: "At the time of the Conquest the Xipe festival fell during the spring, in our month of March, and much of its imagery suggests agricultural renewal: as a seed germinates, it feeds off the rotting hull around it, finally letting the new shoot emerge. The Xipe impersonators wore the old skins until they were rotten, when the young man once again emerged." The Xipe-Toltec piece offered here displays a priest wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim, as seen with the rolled skin folds seen hanging below the neck, the skin leggings, the skin bundles tied at the back shoulder and the right hip, and the human skin mask. There are black-bitumen painted highlights seen on the headband with medallions, earplugs, lips, and eyes. There are also black-bitumen painted extruded eyeballs that are seen hanging from the eye openings, and the black lips accentuate an open mouth that shows this dramatic figurine chanting in a ritual posture. This expressive figure is also holding a floral designed fan with petals, which may represent the Xipe ritual of regeneration. This piece is made from a light gray terracotta, and has light tan mineral deposits. This piece was repaired from several large fragments, which is usually the case for large-scale Veracruz pieces such as this, and this piece is a better example than what is usually seen. The floral fan is an attribute that is seldom seen as well, and this is a principle reason why this large example is a scarce to rare type. The floral fan also indicates that the individual depicted is likely in the act of performing the "Xipe-Toltec" regeneration ceremony, along with the fact that this priest is seen with an open mouth who appears to be chanting in the act of the regeneration ceremony which ensured the planting and growth of the new years crops. The majority of these figurines are seen simply standing in an upright position, and are not seen holding any implements of any sort, but more importantly, the majority of these Veracruz "Xipe-Toltec" figurines do not display a dramatic facial expression such as this example. (Another Veracruz "Remojadas" example of this type and of the same size is offered in Bonhams African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2012, no. 3. $8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates, $10,000.00 realized.) For the type offered here see: "Ancient Art of Veracruz", Ethnic Arts Council of Los Angeles, 1971, no. 31. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bonhams Art & Artifacts of the Americas auction, San Francisco, Sept. 2012, no. 1039. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #573393
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Apulian/Gnathian baby feeder and/or strainer. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels, but I think this ceramic may have been used to filter olive oil. This piece dates circa Last Quarter of the 4th century BC and is extremely rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is also a blend with the Gnathian culture. This piece is intact, is in mint to superb condition, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This attractive vessel has a delicate ivy leaf tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim, and there are incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) There are also white spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of this intact piece. The outer extension also slopes upwards so that the liquid would flow in an even flow with a great deal of control. An extremely rare type that is probably unique. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1295159
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,875.00
This rare piece is a Roman bronze figurine that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This impressive piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This piece also has an even beautiful dark blue/green patina with spotty red highlights, and is in excellent condition with no noticeable breaks or chips. This piece is seen standing with the full weight on the left leg, and the other leg is slightly bent while the body is seen slightly leaning to the right. This piece also stands by itself, and is placed on a custom stand for added stability. This piece has extremely refined facial detail, and there are other minute details seen on this piece such as the design of the sandals. The figure seen here may also depict Alexander the Great, as it displays many attributes that are known for this dynamic Greek figure from antiquity. Although this piece is a Roman bronze, the Greek features seen on this piece are unmistakable, such as the Greek muscled cuirass which is worn over the Greek knee-length "chiton", the attached cape "chlamys" which falls behind, and the pose of the figure that is seen with the weight on one leg. In addition, this figure has upswept curls above the forehead known as an "anastole" hair style, along with thick locks of leonine hair, deep set eyes, an angular jaw, and a prominent brow which are all facial features of Alexander the Great. This figure is also seen extending his right arm, and the open upturned hand likely held a missing round "phiale", which held wine that was used for sacrificial offerings to the Gods. This military figure also appears to be in the act of offering wine sacrifice to the Gods, and this type of wine sacrifice using a "phiale" was purely a Greek religious rite, rather than a Roman ritual. It's possible that this figurine reminded the owner in Roman times of Alexander's visit to Troy, as he was the new Achilles - the champion of the Greeks and, as Achilles had done 1,000 years before, he sacrificed in the temple of Athena. Wealthy and cultivated Romans would often engage the topic of Alexander's notable personality, his superhuman accomplishments, and the human fate with their philosophical discourses. It would not be surprising to find his image in the intimacy of a domestic villa. The famous Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum contained a whole collection of several bronze busts representing Greek Hellenistic rulers, Greek poets, and philosophers, which serves as an eloquent example of the cultural preferences of the Roman elite. This figurine also appears to be grasping a Roman sword known as a "gladius", which had a rounded pummel as seen here. The Roman general Marcus Antony also favored Greek dress as seen on this figurine, and this piece may also represent a "duality of portraiture", in that it is a combination of Greek and Roman attributes, and may represent more than one famous individual and/or military leader. What is certain relative to this rare figurine, is that this figure is both a military and religious figure, and this combination is best displayed in the figurine offered here. (Another analogous example of a Roman bronze figurine in the guise of Alexander the Great, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. Approximately 3.75 inches high, circa 1st-3rd century A.D., and complete. $47,500.00 fixed price. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1276371
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extra large Mayan tripod plate dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 15.75 inches in diameter by 4 inches high. This piece has been attributed to the Peten region of the Yucatan Peninsula, and is an exceptional example for the type. This appealing piece has very vibrant dark orange/red, white, black, and light blue/gray colors. This piece has three legs, along with an esoteric upward sloping bowl which has the multi-colored polychrome glaze on the top inner side of the vessel, and a light brown terracotta on the underside of the vessel. This piece has a "serpent band" that is seen running around the inner edge of the plate, and this has two symbols that alternate and appear to interlock within the design. These symbols may be celestial in nature, and frame the Mayan cartouche glyph that is seen in the field in the center of the plate. This Mayan cartouche glyph also has an inner central glyph, which resembles a face with an open mouth. This glyph is the Mayan glyph "Ajaw", meaning "lord". According to Dr. Mark Van Stone, Professor of Art History, Southwestern College, and noted Maya expert specializing in Mayan hieroglyphs and calligraphy, who also co-authored the book "Reading the Maya Glyphs", commented the following regarding this piece: "Now, that date in the center is pretty unusal. It recalls the Ajaw Alters we find at Caracol and some other sites: a round alter with a text encircling a huge Ajaw date, which marks the "name" (the last day) of a "Period Ending" (usually a K'atun-end). It is a normal "Ajaw" day sign in its normal cartouche, surmounted by a numeral 13, to read "13 Ajaw", a date of important augury, as 13 was the number with the most power, and a period-ending on "13 Ajaw" was really significant. (It was the date chosen by Carl Johan Calleman for his calculation of the "End of the World"-11th Oct. 2011, in contrast to the more popular "4 Ajaw PE"-21st Dec. 2012.) In any event, it's perfectly legible, and the kind of thing that would be learned first by a student scribe." This scarce to rare piece has a cartouche date glyph that is a marker to an important event, and/or refers to an event in the Mayan calendar, and the cartouche date glyph seen on this piece is a significant example, as noted above by Dr. Mark Van Stone. The number "13", associated with the cartouche date glyph, is easily seen and represented by two bars and three dots that are attached to the top of the cartouche date glyph. This piece has some minor repair/crack fill from three large fragments, and is 99-100% original. There is also some attractive root marking seen in various sections of the piece, along with some minute black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a large and rare Mayan plate with extremely rare symbols and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. A TL authenticity test is available from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 18611, dated Jan. 7th, 1986. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #902203
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare Mayan carved bottle dates to the early Classic period, circa 300-400 A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and is a light brown terracotta with dark brown highlights. This highly important piece is divided into three segments, and as a whole, displays the three Mayan glyphs that represent the "Palenque Triad", gods GI, GII, and GIII. This trio of gods were celebrated as divine ancestors by the kings of Palenque, and this is the principle reason why these three gods have been labeled the "Palenque Triad". The piece offered here may be from the Palenque region, and it is certainly from the Peten region, as the artistic style of the carved glyphs place it in this region which is modern day Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico. The artistic style of the deep carving seen on this piece may even be earlier than circa 300 A.D., and may represent the earliest glyphs that represent these three gods, which would make them late Protoclassic period, circa 200-300 A.D. The GII god glyph, otherwise known as "God K", has elements that are analogous to the Protoclassic glyph seen on Abaj Takalik Stela 5. (See "The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and The Maya", by Mary Miller and Carl Taube, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1993, p. 131.) GI rarely appears on Mayan painted pottery, and is associated with Venus and the sun, and likely represents one of the Mayan "Hero Twins". He has a shark's tooth, square eyes, scalloped eyebrows, and a shell earflare. GII, known as "God K", "Bolon Dzacab", and the "Flare God" has a forehead with a smoking celt or torch, a mirror head, and serpent-headed foot. This god is associated with the accession of Mayan royalty and royal self-inflicted bloodletting. GIII is associated with the "Baby Jaguar" god, the "Water-lily Jaguar" god, and one of the "Hero Twins". He has a "kin" sign on his cheek or forehead, a squint eye, and a Roman nose. The glyphs seen on the piece offered here all have elements of the above gods that are seen within the glyphs itself, and are seldom seen together on one vessel. In addition, each glyph has a central eye that is denoted with a small incised line design, which is slightly different for each eye seen within the glyph, and this minute incised eye detail was probably the last decorative element that was added to the piece by this skilled Mayan artist/scribe. This piece may also have contained red cinnabar, as traces of this compound are seen within the vessel and some low relief points of the glyphs. The red cinnabar was used by the Maya to preserve the departed, and royal tombs were often coated with this substance. The piece offered here was also hand carved, and a mold was not used to create the design, as is often the case with small Mayan bottles and flasks of this type. This piece is extremely rare, if not unique, and Mayan carved and painted vessels with the complete "Palenque Triad" are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Chuck Warren collection, Miami, Fl. (1970's) Ex: Erasmo Toledo collection, Miami, Fl. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1267183
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates to the Classical Period, circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches in diameter, by 1.6 inches high. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and has an exceptional gold "river patina" with some spotty dark red and brown mineral deposits. The rare gold "river patina" sometimes occurs on ancient Greek bronzes of this type, due to the metal of this piece having a high tin content, and the highly mineralized soil conditions from which this piece was buried. This piece was also hand beaten from a single sheet of bronze, and there is some weight to this piece as this piece is thick walled. In the inside center of this piece, there is a raised circular roundel known as an "omphalos", which in the ancient Greek mind represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks regarded the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. Delphi enshrined the sacred half-egg stone, which was also known as the "omphalos", and "omphalos" in Greek means "navel". The "omphalos" seen on the piece offered here is raised very high within the vessel, and also served as a finger grip on the bottom outer side, as this piece was made without any handles. This type of vessel is also known as a "libation vessel", and it is ceremonial in nature, as it was used at temple and/or funeral ceremonies. This type of vessel with it's flat bottom, and central "omphalos", was used for pouring and/or offering libations. The design elements of this type of vessel, along with the sacred symbols built into the piece, made this type of vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and was often made as a temple or grave offering. (For this type of vessel, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Co. Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp. 74-83.) The bronze piece offered here is much better than most examples, and has an exceptional patina that is seldom seen on the market. A custom Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000040. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: