Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1248144
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,875.00
This beautiful Greek Campanian pelike ceramic is attributed to the Laghetto Painter, and dates circa 350-340 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 6.25 inches high by 5 inches in diameter, and is in mint condition with no restoration/repair. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in it's pristine "as found" condition. In addition, this piece has a multi-colored iridescent patina, that is seen over sections that have a deep black glaze. This piece has a draped and seated young woman on a spotted rock that is holding up a mirror in her right hand. She is also seen wearing a detailed brilliant white dotted necklace, and her exposed right breast is not often seen relative to Campanian type ceramics. The brilliant white necklace draws the eye to the exposed right breast, and vice-versa, and this convention of art is a mark of an accomplished painter. The face of the woman also has a very sweet and young beautiful portrait. The other side of this piece shows a nude standing Satyr that is seen holding a white fillet in the right hand, and a thyrsus on the left shoulder. The thyrsus is a long staff, surmounted with a fir-cone, and was carried by Dionysus and satyrs during the celebration of religious rites. The thyrsus also ends in a sharp point of a spear, and the ancient Greeks thought that a puncture from this staff would induce madness. The face of the well-defined muscular and nude Satyr is also a young portrait, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Campanian ceramics attributed to the Laghetto Painter are scarce to rare, and in addition, this type of piece is rare, as two-handled pelikes of this type were seldom produced in Campania. According to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, New York, 1989, p. 157: "However, in the last third of the century there is a strong wave of Apulian influence on both Campanian and Paestan, probably due to the arrival of migrant artists, and the xylophone and naiskos, hitherto confined to Apulian, appear in the west for the first time, though the typically Apulian volute-krater is not found in Campania, nor are the column-krater, loutrophoros, nestoris and rhyton, and the pelike is extremely rare". The Laghetto Painter also was active in Capua, and was a follower of the Cassandra Painter, and both of these painters are considered two of the best Campanian painters that produced very realistic looking scenes with attractive faces. Another parallel Greek Campanian ceramic attributed to the Circle of the Cassandra Painter that shows a running deer, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II", Sept. 2010, no. 150. (This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high by 8.7 inches wide from handle to handle, as this piece is a "skyphos". $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The type of piece offered here, "pelike", is seldom seen on the market, along with it's mint condition, and great eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, Augsburg, circa 1990's. Note: This piece has additional documentation that is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C. The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus grade. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Walter Knox collection, Phoenix, AZ., Ex: Private CO. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little piece is an Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is superb to mint quality, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This superb to mint piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #778770
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This banded white and light yellow marble Sumerian stamp seal is in the form of a recumbent fox and dates circa 3500-2900 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 1.25 inches long and is an exceptional example for the type. This esoteric piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the top to the bottom center, and there are two animals seen on the flat back side that were carved into the piece. The overall carving of this piece is very detailed and represents a high degree of workmanship, as this piece was produced at the very dawn of civilization when city-states were first formed. The two animals, seen on the back flat side, appear to be identical and served as a stamp and/or seal, and may have represented value in a transaction. This mint quality stamp seal/amulet appears to be a fox, as the head is very angular, along with the raised ears. ( For another analogous example see Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Ada Small Moore Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Seals", New York, Dec. 1991, no. 3, $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates. ) This piece was probably part of a necklace, and the vertical bow drilled hole allowed this piece to hang with other seals/amulets of this type. This translucent piece has some spotty mineral deposits, and these deposits can be seen within the eyes, and become darker when one looks through this piece into a lighted background. ( See attached photo. ) This eerie effect makes this piece look alive, and the deposits seen within the eyes may in part be original inlay. Only a skilled artist could achieve this visual effect. This exceptional piece is mounted on a custom plexiglas stand, can easily lift off the stand, and can be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, and some dark green/brown mineral deposits. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some heavy white calcite deposits that are seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and were placed in tombs, and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Antiquities Auction 2005. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #854857
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This impressive piece is a Hellenistic Greek silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C. to the early 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several strands of silver in an intricate interwoven pattern, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .39 inches in diameter. The clasp is made from bronze and is very durable and can be used even today. There are two cylindrical terminal ends which attach to the bronze clasp, and these terminal ends have an attractive wire band "S" type pattern within. This "S" type pattern is a Hellenistic Greek convention of art as well. The central round hoop also has this pattern, and the round hoop may have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could only have been owned by a wealthy individual, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a valuable material in antiquity. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as well as today, because of it's intrinsic visual appeal. There is also a small ancient repair seen on one side of the chain, and this piece may have been broken and subsequently repaired because of civil unrest. Another example of this type of piece was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62 (L3,500.00-L5,500.00 Pounds estimates.). The Christie's example cited here is also from the same collection as the example offered here, and both of these pieces are analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The piece offered here may easily be worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central round hoop. This piece is also a nice collectable as a piece of ancient jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This silver piece has an attractive dark grey patina and the bronze hoop has a nice light green patina. A custom necklace case is included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1018188
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This rare piece is made from a red/brown terracotta and has spotty light brown earthern deposits. This piece is a terracotta model of a theatrical mask and dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This superb example is approximately 5.3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and this is the normal size for a votive mask of this type. This piece is intact, and is 100% original. There are some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and some minute stress cracks and pitting which is normally seen on a piece of this type as it is mold made. This superb piece has a very dramatic face which depicts a youth with a slightly open mouth with wide open eyes. This mask was likely votive, and this piece may also have been buried with an individual who was active in the theatrical arts. (For additional examples see "The Greek World, Art and Civilization in Magna Graecia and Sicily", edited by Giovanni Pugliese Carratelli, Rizzoli Pub., New York, 1996, pp.713-717.) The top forehead is not extended back, as real hair and/or a wreath was added to this piece for added effect. This type of design would also serve an individual well in life, as well as the afterlife, and this mask may have been intended to depict a character such as Hecuba and/or Taltibio, from the Greek tragedy "Le Troiane" by Euripides. This mask, as a votive burial object, may have been intended to represent Hecuba's expression of profound pain and/or Taltibio's contrasting sentiment, which in both cases allude to the moment when the small Trojan baby Astyanax was barbarously killed. The horror of this moment was magnified, as the small Astyanax was thrown down from the walls of Troy by Menelaus, while his mother Andromache is taken away as a slave as the flames rise over Troy. These votive masks were intended to represent characters in ancient Greek tragedies, as noted above, as well as comedies. In any case, very few examples come to the market and are rare. This piece is mounted on a museum quality custom stand and has great eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258851
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
These two beautiful pieces are two matching solid Greek gold earrings that date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 1.2 inches in diameter, and are 1/8 wide at the square terminal ends. These pieces weigh approximately 5.1 grams and 7.7 grams, as one piece has a slightly larger rounded inner hoop diameter, and a slightly larger square terminal end. These pieces were worn through pierced ears, and the square terminal ends held them in place, as the main body of these pieces are rounded to easily run through the pieced ears. These pieces are a scarce type, although they are a simple design, and were easy to adjust to the individual. In this case, the slightly larger inner rounded diameter size of one earring may have been custom made for a wealthy lady in antiquity, who may have had a larger pieced ear hole on one ear than the other. The outer width diameter of both pieces is a perfect match with an approximate diameter of 1.2 inches, although the inner rounded diameter sizes are slightly different from one another, with one hoop slightly thicker than the other. This type of construction is a good indication that these pieces were perhaps custom made for one individual. These pieces are also solid, and have fine etched line design seen on all four sides of the square terminal ends. These pieces also have some minute deposits, extremely minute scratches, and a slight oxidized yellowish patina which is consistent with ancient gold pieces. These solid pieces are also in mint to superb condition with no cracks and/or repair, and are in fact solid enough so that they can even be worn today. These beautiful pieces also hang from a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and have a bright yellow color that can be seen at a great distance. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,465.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art, Dec. 2004, no. 148. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1250013
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare and cute piece is a Moche blackware feline that dates Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This early Moche piece is approximately 8.25 inches long by 7.2 inches high. This black glossy glazed piece is intact, and has some attractive light brown burnishing and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This cute piece is a reclined feline that is seen with his long-tailed prey in his mouth, and this prey appears to be a small mammal and/or mouse. This feline's powerful bared teeth are seen holding it's prey securely in place, and this feline also appears to be relaxed, as he is seen reclined with his lower torso to one side along with his wavy tail. This feline is also seen with forward-curving ears, graceful incised whiskers, rectangular nose, and a compact body. There is also a stirrup-spout at the top of the body, and male attributes are seen between the hind legs. This type of Moche ceramic normally does not have prey in his mouth, and as such, is an extremely rare type. Another analogous blackware reclined feline piece, without the prey, is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 14. (See attached photo. $1,200.00-$1,800.00 estimates, $1,210.00 realized.) The feline offered here may be a rare black jaguar, or a smaller feline such as a puma. Wild felines held a special place in the mythology of the ancient Americas. The felines special night vision combined with their powers as hunters were often likened to the power of shamans who would incorporate feline elements into their costumes or paraphernalia. The piece seen here also has enlarged eyes, which emphasize this creature's excellent night vision, and the face of this feline has anthropomorphic characteristics. This type of piece is extremely rare, as it is a type that has the caught prey, is in superb condition, and has great eye appeal. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: