Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1248144
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,875.00
This beautiful Greek Campanian pelike ceramic is attributed to the Laghetto Painter, and dates circa 350-340 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 6.25 inches high by 5 inches in diameter, and is in mint condition with no restoration/repair. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in it's pristine "as found" condition. In addition, this piece has a multi-colored iridescent patina, that is seen over sections that have a deep black glaze. This piece has a draped and seated young woman on a spotted rock that is holding up a mirror in her right hand. She is also seen wearing a detailed brilliant white dotted necklace, and her exposed right breast is not often seen relative to Campanian type ceramics. The brilliant white necklace draws the eye to the exposed right breast, and vice-versa, and this convention of art is a mark of an accomplished painter. The face of the woman also has a very sweet and young beautiful portrait. The other side of this piece shows a nude standing Satyr that is seen holding a white fillet in the right hand, and a thyrsus on the left shoulder. The thyrsus is a long staff, surmounted with a fir-cone, and was carried by Dionysus and satyrs during the celebration of religious rites. The thyrsus also ends in a sharp point of a spear, and the ancient Greeks thought that a puncture from this staff would induce madness. The face of the well-defined muscular and nude Satyr is also a young portrait, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Campanian ceramics attributed to the Laghetto Painter are scarce to rare, and in addition, this type of piece is rare, as two-handled pelikes of this type were seldom produced in Campania. According to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, New York, 1989, p. 157: "However, in the last third of the century there is a strong wave of Apulian influence on both Campanian and Paestan, probably due to the arrival of migrant artists, and the xylophone and naiskos, hitherto confined to Apulian, appear in the west for the first time, though the typically Apulian volute-krater is not found in Campania, nor are the column-krater, loutrophoros, nestoris and rhyton, and the pelike is extremely rare". The Laghetto Painter also was active in Capua, and was a follower of the Cassandra Painter, and both of these painters are considered two of the best Campanian painters that produced very realistic looking scenes with attractive faces. Another parallel Greek Campanian ceramic attributed to the Circle of the Cassandra Painter that shows a running deer, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II", Sept. 2010, no. 150. (This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high by 8.7 inches wide from handle to handle, as this piece is a "skyphos". $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The type of piece offered here, "pelike", is seldom seen on the market, along with it's mint condition, and great eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, Augsburg, circa 1990's. Note: This piece has additional documentation that is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1118927
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a Satyr mask. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 5.1 inches high by 4.2 inches wide. This piece is complete, and is intact, save for some very minute and old stress crack fill. This piece was mold made from a light yellow/tan terracotta, and it has nice detail. There are spotty dark black and brown deposits, along with some minute root marking. This piece is in the form of a Satyr head who is seen with an open mouth, goat horns at the top of the forehead, and goat ears. Satyrs were renowned for their lascivious appetites and mischievous behaviour, and personified the unrestrained fertility of Nature in the wild. They particularly enjoyed pursuing the nymphs, on whom they hoped to gratify their lust. In ancient Greek literature the Satyrs, like the Seleni, were debased and comic figures, for it was the custom of the Greek tragic poets, after presenting a trilogy of plays recounting one of the serious mythological dramas, to terminate their contributions to the festival of Dionysus with the performance of a light comedy based on the activities of these untragic folk. The type of terracotta mask offered here, was associated with the choruses of Greek drama and were often dedicated by revelers during Dionysiac festivals. This piece is likely a votive comic mask, and masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines, and/or graves, by individuals who were linked to the theater, either as a known patron, participant, or admirer of the arts. This dramatic piece shows the face of a Satyr with an open mouth and eyes, which conveys a look of surprize and perhaps even an emotion such as fear. The hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Another Greek terracotta theater mask of this analogous type and size from the David Leibert collection, was offered at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no. 185. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C. The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus grade. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242952
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian red-figure plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 6.4 inches in diameter by 1.7 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the TPS Painter, and this workshop produced several of the best Apulian painters for the period. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, but more importantly, this vessel has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this appealing piece has a head of a woman facing left, who is seen wearing a sakkos, large earrings painted white, and a white dotted necklace. There is a plate seen at the front of the bust, and a palmate pattern seen behind. The plate may also be a symbol that denoted the TPS Painter. In addition, there are two triple dotted patterns, along with two ivy leaf symbols seen within the field. There is a wave pattern, an ivy leaf pattern, and a orange and black line pattern that is seen framing the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a dark black reserve seen at the bottom, along with a footed base. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel. This piece is analogous to the example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. (This analogous Christie's piece, also attributed to the TPS Painter, was offered with another Apulian plate attributed to the Darius-Underworld workshop, specifically the Painter of Zurich 2660. Both of these plates are also of nearly the same size and quality as the example offered here. Both of these pieces were offered together as one lot, and had a $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimate, and both pieces together realized $8,750.00. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the TPS Painter, Darius-Underworld workshop, see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1130376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a young God and/or King. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 4.9 inches high by 4.7 inches wide. This intact piece is complete, and has spotty dark black and brown earthern deposits both on the front and back side surfaces. This beautiful piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and has sharp detail. This piece is in the form of a young God and/or King who is seen with an upward gaze, and is wearing a diadem band on the forehead. The diadem band is also a Greek Hellenistic symbol of royalty, along with being an emblem of sovereignty, and this mask may also portray a king and/or a character in an ancient Greek play. This terracotta mask is a votive type piece, and is likely a tragic type theater mask. Votive masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines by individuals who were linked to the theater, and were often dedicated after a trilogy of plays were performed that recounted one of the serious mythological dramas. The single hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering, and is a scarce type. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #924277
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This beautiful piece is a flawless Roman glass cup that is in mint condition, with no chips and/or cracks. This piece is a blue/green glass, is approximately 2.8 inches high by 3.8 inches in diameter, and has attractive root marks with a multi-iridescent patina. This piece dates circa 2nd century A.D.-early 3rd century A.D., and has a ring base which is normally seen on larger pieces that are classified as "bowls". An analogous example is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum " by John Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 178. This piece is an exceptional scarce roman glass cup/beaker that is designed as a larger "bowl" type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1208597
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,865.00
This scarce piece is a Mayan brownware tripod vessel, "Teotihuacan Type", that dates circa 250-450 A.D. This Mayan piece is classified as having "Teotihuacan" artistic style, and is of the type seen in "Pre-Columbian Art, The Morton D. May and The Saint Lewis Art Museum Collections" by L.A. Parsons, New York, 1980, Fig. 133. This superb piece is approximately 8.3 inches high by 12.4 inches in diameter, and is complete with some limited crack fill/repair. This piece also has some traces of red cinnabar in the low relief molded sections of the vessel, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There is a black polychrome band seen below the rim, and there are raised coffee bean symbols that are seen running around the vessel at the base of the bowl. This attractive brownware piece is supported by three hollow slab feet that show an identical trophy/death head molded design, and the bowl has a molded frieze that runs around the piece. This molded frieze is divided into three sections by incised bands, and each section has an identical impressed molded design that was repeated three times. This impressed molded design shows a Mayan ballplayer on one knee, and he is wearing a yoke around his waist, along with a helmet/headdress and other regalia. There also appears to be a speech-scroll seen running away from this figure as well. He is seen bouncing a large ball off his hip/yoke, and this large ball also appears to be depicted at the moment of impact. This figure may represent the Mayan Hero Twin "Xbalanque", who was the great mythic ballplayer in the Mayan "Popol Vuh". In addition, this impressed molded design shows a standing individual/ballplayer that is seen facing the ballplayer that is seen on one knee, and this standing individual/ballplayer has a skull-like old man facial design, and likely represents one of the Mayan Death Gods of Xibalba, which is the Mayan underworld. This standing Death God is seen holding a hanging object, and this may be a handstone, "manopla", which was used in the ballgame perhaps during the serve, or it may represent a squash, which represents a severed head of the other Hero Twin, "Hunahpu". This standing Death God may represent "God L", who was also one of the principle gods of the underworld, and was known as "Lord of the Underworld". The number three is also significant regarding the Mayan ballgame, as the Maya were thought to have played the game with three principle players on each side. It is interesting to note that this piece has three legs that each depict a trophy/death head, along with the three sections of the molded frieze which each have the three identical molded impressions as noted above. There is a total of nine molded impressions, three per section, seen within the molded frieze that runs around this piece, and the number nine is associated with the Hero Twins. (See "The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican Ballgame", M. Whittington Ed., Thames and Hudson, New York, 2001, p.239, which also shows a scene which is very analogous to the scene seen on the piece offered here, and that is the Hero Twin "Xbalanque" on one knee hitting the ball with his yoke, and the standing "God L". See attached photo.) According to Linda Schele in "The Code of Kings", New York, 1998, p. 213: "Both sets of Twins (Hero Twins) confronted the Lords of Death in the ballgame, which was a symbolic form of warfare. The Hero Twins used the dance to defeat Death, and it was in the ballcourt that they resurrected their dead forebears. It was also in the ballcourt that the Maize Gods stayed after the successful Fourth Creation and the engendering of humanity. It is there that human beings must go to worship the Maize Gods." This piece was also likely ceremonial in nature, given the Mayan ballgame symbols, and may have held an offering such as a severed head, possibly from a ballplayer. The Mayan death head symbol seen on the legs of the vessel also support this theory, along with the fact that this type of piece is known as a votive offering vessel. The noted Mayan epigraphist, Dr. Mark Van Stone, has confirmed that the three legs seen on this vessel have: "a head on the leg that represents a generic trophy head" and, "his eye is closed, which suggests a captive decapitation, and his jaw is hidden by a scroll, a little like the head-variant of (Te)". This exceptional piece is scarce to rare, as most Mayan vessels of this type portray warriors and/or battle scenes, rather than a scene from the Mayan ballcourt. Another analogous vessel of this type that portrays a molded priest/warrior in flight is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 1991, no. 155. ($8,000.00-$10,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Donick Cary collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #701988
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads and a complete celt god pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the celt god pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inch wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D. and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and the pendant were bow-drilled, with a hole created from each end. The pendant shows line cut design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. These pendants had magical properties and were worn as personal adornments which conveyed the status and rank of the owner. The ax god jade pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many Pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Precolumbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993. This piece can be worn as is, but probably needs to be restrung. Ex: F. Hirsch collection, Germany. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,800.00
This huge Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century AD and is intact, and is in mint condition with no stress cracks and/or chips. This large piece is approximately 7.25 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (See Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213, for an analogous example that is approximately 9.25 inches high. This piece has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #968903
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This charming piece is a black steatite spindal whorl that was used for weaving textiles. This pieces dates circa 3100-2600 B.C. and is likely Anatolian or Syrian, as the four figures seen on this piece are analogous to the figures seen on carved cylinder seals for the period and region. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, London, "Western Asiatic Cylinder seals and Antiquities from the Erlenmeyer Collection, Part 1", July 1992, no. 31-33.) Black steatite is very difficult to carve, as it is a very hard stone, and this adds to the rarity of this piece. In addition, this type of stone comes mostly from the Syrian region, and cylinder seals, rather than spindle whorls, are much more common. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, by .5 inches high. This piece is conical in shape, has a hole bow drilled through the center, and has four separate registers with a figure within. Two of the figures seen in profile may be images of a deer, and a dog or a wolf. The other two images may be seen from the top, and may represent the same animals, but if seen in profile, they are very anthropomorphic, and its also possible that both views were meant to be portrayed. This piece has very minute root marking and striations that are seen on the entire piece which is a good sign of authenticity, in addition, there are mineral deposits seen in many of the low relief points. This piece is scarce to rare, and is in superb condition for the type. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre 1492 item #1185287
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is an Inka-Chimu canteen vessel that dates circa 1450-1533 A.D. This piece is approxiamtely 8.5 inches high by 3.5 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive glossy black glaze with some dark brown burnishing. This piece has an indented depression on each side, and seen centered within, is a star and a spiral symbol on each side of the vessel. The star is a well known Inka symbol, and is often seen as a design shape on Inka bronze mace heads and black basalt bowls. The spiral design is also seen as a Nazca line symbol, and these line symbols created in the desert were constructed by the Nazca to have been viewed by the Gods from the air. The Nazca spiral design may have served as a "water/rain symbol", and the canteen vessel offered here may have held water in a votive capacity as well. (An analogous Nazca spiral symbol is seen published in "The Mystery On the Desert" by Maria Reiche, pub. 1949, reprint 1968.) The piece offered here was also likely made by Chimu potters who simply continued working for their Inka masters who conquered their city state of Chanchan circa 1470 A.D. The piece offered here derives from earlier Chimu pottery types/techniques, notably the lustrous blackware made by the north-coast potters of Chanchan and Lambayaque. One feature of these Chimu potters, seen on the vessel offered here, is the single elongated neck of the vessel. This piece is an interesting example of Andean pre-Columbian art, as it has symbols that are common to several cultures, and has a very esoteric shape which is another hallmark of Inka ceramics. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249675
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche seated man that is Moche IV Period, circa 450-550 A.D., and is approximately 8.3 inches high. This interesting piece is intact, save for a filled stress crack in the upper stirrup-handle, and is in superb condition with vibrant dark red, light brown, and cream colors. This piece is a seated Moche man who is dressed with regal ear flares, a wrapped headdress, a dark red back sack, and a cream colored tunic. The individual portrayed here does appear to have some social status in a regal or religious context, as he is seen finely dressed, and he is also seen holding a ceramic in each hand which may point to a ceremonial activity. This individual displays a pronounced facial deformity, which was also held in high regard by the Moche, as this was thought to be a sign from the gods. Special status and sacredness may have been accorded to those who suffered diseases and other physical handicaps. The pronounced deformed face of this individual has skin drawn tight over the bones, and is likely the result of a tropical disease. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture, and the piece offered here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture. Moche ceramics that are medical related, and depict individuals with diseases and/or deformities such as this piece, are rare to extremely rare. Another analogous example that portrays a deformed face is seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., by Kathlenn Berrin, San Francisco, 1997, no. 69. (See attached photo. This portrait-head type vessel seen in the Larco Herrara Museum may also be a portrait of the same individual as seen on the ceramic offered here. Both pieces have analogous features and are both Moche IV Period.) The individual seen here with the deformed face and diminutive nose was likely caused by a tropical disease known as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symtoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasel septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring. (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) The piece seen here likely displays the disease noted above, rather than a battle injury, or a ritualistic mutilation, but whatever the case, this interesting piece is an extremely rare Moche vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1260116
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Minoan culture bronze double-ax, which dates Middle Minoan III-Late Minoan I Periods, circa 1700-1450 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches long by 4.1 inches high, and has an attractive even dark green/brown patina. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, some minute root marking, and is a complete and intact example which is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition. This powerful piece is a hammered bronze piece that is very thin, and is made from two sections that are riveted together with four rivets. These riveted sections also form a central horizontal hole that was used to mount a bronze or wooden rod. This piece is also a votive type piece, as it is made from thin sheet bronze, and is an imitation of a heavy bronze battle ax. The bronze with this piece is also thick enough so it does not bend easily, and the sheet bronze also appears to be nearly the same thickness as the known Cretan bronze helmets that date circa 8th-7th century B.C. These helmets also have minute rivets, and also have a two-part type construction as the votive bronze double-ax offered here. The Lydian word for "ax" is "labrys", as related by Plutarch. The word "labyrinth", derived from the word "labrys", was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the palaces in Crete, such as Knossos, and also referred to the "double-ax" symbol represented by the piece offered here. The symbol of the "double-ax" also always accompanies goddesses, and it seems that it was also the Minoan symbol of the beginning of the creation. This also explains why this piece is votive, and was offered in tombs and sacred places. It is also believed that this type of power piece served as a standard in religious shrines and temples. See F. Schachermeyer in "Die Minoische Kultur des Alten Kreta", 1990, pp. 161, 237, and 238.; and W.H.D. Rouse, "The Double Axe and the Labyrinth, The Journal of Hellenis Studies 21", 1901.; and John Chadwick, "The Mycenaean World", 1976. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1250345
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This rare piece is a superb Greek Paestan skyphos that dates circa mid 4th century B.C., and is attributed to the Sydney Painter. This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high by 8.8 inches wide from handle to handle. This attractive piece has a deep black glaze with vibrant light red/orange painted details, and in addition, there are deep incised line details seen within the painted images. This intact piece has a deep black glossy glaze, no repair/restoration, and no over paint. This piece shows a nude dancing man moving to his left and looking back to his right. This erotic dancer is seen with his right arm raised, and he is seen holding a tambourine in his left hand and cloak over his left arm. This dancing nude man also has an added actors prop, which is a belly attachment that enlarges his stomach and extends his genitals. The individual portrayed here is an actor in a comedy play known as a "phlyax", and the type of vessel seen here is often referred to as a "Phlyax-type" vase, named after the type of local farce (phlyax) depicted upon them. These Middle Comody plays consisted of parodies of well-known myths or comic representations of scenes from everyday life. The phylax vases reveal a vein of rustic humor and a sense of the ridiculous, which is a refreshing type of vase which breaks the general monotony of "Myth-type" vases. The back side depicts a standing draped individual with a staff held in the right hand, and this individual stands in stark contrast to the moving nude individual seen on the opposite side of this vessel. Both individuals are framed by elaborate floral decoration which "frames" each individual like a picture, and this an artistic hallmark of Greek Paestan ceramics. The bottom of this appealing vessel also has a dotted pattern, a deep black glaze seen within the inside surface, and a egg-and-dotted pattern seen at the upper rim. This piece was also used as a wine drinking vessel, as it is a skyphos, and the erotic comic scene portrayed on this vessel is very appropriate for a piece of this type. This rare piece is also attributed to the Sydney Painter, circa 350 B.C., who was thought by A.D. Trendall to be "active at least for a time at Paestum." (See A.D. Trendall, "The Red-Figured vases of Paestum", British School at Rome, 1987, p.380.) Trendall also identified several features seen in the vessel offered here such as: 1. The use of incision for details; the incised lines cut through the added red to reveal the black underneath. 2. The eye is shown at an acute angle. 3. The hair is shown as a solid black mass. (See page 380 as noted above.) Another analogous example from the Sydney Painter is seen in Trendall, pl. 238, no.f. (See attached photo. The Trendall example is seen in Vienna, no. 131, and is a skyphos that is nearly identical in size to the piece offered here. The treatment of the eye and the floral elements is nearly identical as well.) Ex: Private German collection. Note: This piece has additional documentation that is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: