Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584209
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This flawless Roman glass plate is a light blue color and is approximately 9.4 inches in diameter by 2.25 inches high. This large piece dates circa 1st century AD and has a nice multi-colored patina. This piece has an applied ring base foot and a verticle wall with folded cordon at the base. This vessel has an exceptional high degree of workmanship, as the folds seen within this vessel form and strengthen the overall piece. This piece is very analogous in type, color, and size to the superb example recently sold at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 143. ( $3,800.00 bid, $4,750.00 with buyer's premium. ) Ex: Christie's Antiquities, June 2001, no. 210. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1253763
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare piece is a Roman gladius sword that dates to the mid/late Roman Republican period, circa 140-20 B.C. This stunning piece is approximately 26.25 inches long, from the tip to the end of the tang, and the blade is approximately 23 inches long, from the tip to the top of the hilt. The blade is also approximately 1.2 inches wide at the hilt, and gradually increases in width to the distinctive v-point tip, which is 1.45 inches wide at this point. The blade is made from hammered iron, and is in remarkable superb condition for an iron blade, and there are no noticeable breaks and/or major repairs to the blade. (See included x-ray.) The blade has some minor iron bubbles, which is normal for a blade of this type, and the overall blade was conditioned circa 1980's with a heavy dark brown oil based glaze which has sealed the metal, and provided for an excellent state of preservation. The blade, with the additional width near the v-tip, gave this weapon added weight and made a slashing blow even more effective. The well defined v-tip, which is a prominent feature of the Roman gladius, allowed for stabbing during close combat, and allowed one to get by an opponent that perhaps had a large shield and/or was in a dense formation. The blade edges are also very sharp in sections, and there is a raised central line that runs from the tip to the hilt. This raised central line shows that the blade was hammered over and over again, in order to create a superior weapon that had dense metal and a thicker and stronger mid-section. The blade also has an added decorative plate which has silvered bronze and gold gilt, with decorative cross-patterned punched dotted designs. The edge of this plate has added gold gilt over bronze brackets, which protected the blade when it was taken in and out of it's scabbard. This piece also comes with a distinctive Roman type frame scabbard, that has edge brackets, two support cross pieces, and an enclosed scabbard tip plate. The tip plate is rounded, rather than pointed, which is a rare feature relative to Roman arms, and the plates are also gold gilt over bronze with some silvering added as well. The silvering over the bronze is also a Roman convention of art, and Roman Helmets from the Republic period to the late Imperial period often have silvering applied over bronze or traces it are often seen over the metal. This type of metal application is also known as "tinning", and is a combination of silver and other base metals. The tip plates also have a matching decorative design as the hilt plates seen on the blade, and this design is only seen on the front plate, and the back plate is flat with no designs and has gold gilt over the bronze with no silvering. The overall scabbard precisely fits the blade, and the scabbard had a thin inner and outer leather liner which protected and enclosed the blade within the scabbard. The scabbard also runs two thirds up the blade, and the scabbard may be missing the upper third section, or this section may have been made with a combination of wood and leather. The upper scabbard section may also have been fitted with ring attachments that fitted this piece to a belt with leather ties. There is also a three way "junction phalera" which may have fit into this leather tie attachment system as well. The three way "junction phalera" may or may not have gone with this gladius, but it is thought that all of the pieces offered here were found together in the United Kingdom circa early 1980's. The three way "junction phalera" also date circa late 3rd-2nd century B.C., and has three glass paste circular inlay circles with dotted pattern pins than run from the center. This design is a Celtic type design, and its possible that this piece was made by a Celtic armorer in the service of the Romans in Gaul. The rounded tip plates on the scabbard also are seen in Gaul relative to armor produced by the native La Tene culture, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., as cataloged by F. Quesada Sanz, in "Gladius Hispaniensis: An Archaeological view from Iberia", Journal of Roman Military Equipment Studies, 8, 1997, pp. 251-270. (See attached chart from the above reference showing the evolution of the early Republican gladius sword types, p. 265, Fig. 16.) According to the chart noted above, the sword type offered here is very analogous in size and shape to the Roman gladius sword no. 12, which was found in Delos in 1986 still within it's fragmented frame scabbard. This sword is simply known as the "Delos Sword", and Michel Feugere in "The Arms of the Romans", p. 32, has dated this sword circa 69 B.C. This sword is also one of the few Roman Republic gladius swords that have been found and recorded, and this is the case of the extremely rare piece offered here. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1130040
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This beautiful piece is a Roman silver ring with a red carnelian that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is a size 7-7.5, and is approximately 17 mm wide across the top face, and 27 mm high from the top of the stone to the bottom of the ring. The silver ring bezel is solid silver, and the thick red carnelian is translucent which seems to glow in daylight, and this beautiful glowing effect is very noticable when the light hits this piece. Another noticable feature of this ring is that the flat face of the stone is carved with a standing eagle with outstreched wings, and above is a standing winged Victory goddess who is seen holding a victory fillet at the front. The standing winged Victory is also seen with her feet lifting off the ground, and is seen floating above the standing eagle, who in turn, is seen standing on a ground line. The combination of this design is very powerful, as it presents a "real world" symbol, with the standing eagle on the ground line which represents Rome and the power of Rome, and the floating Victory, which represents a "spiritual world" symbol, with the power of the Victory goddess. The meaning of this combined symbolism is "Victory for Rome", and the Roman eagle was a common symbol associated with the Roman legions, and was the most prominent standard of the Roman army. Roman legionnaires often had a private shrine with a Roman bronze or silver eagle which they worshipped for good luck, and many of these small bronze and silver eagles can be seen on the market today. The Roman soldier who choose this ring as his signet, not only shows his loyalty to Rome, but it also evokes the strength of the Empire and its military, and as such, this ring likely belonged to someone that was in the Roman military and/or was likely connected with it to a high degree. The artistic composition is very skillfully done, and the carving of this gem is better than most examples. The red carnelian gem is also a large example, and is approximately 20 mm high by 14 mm wide. The condition of the gem is superb, save for a small internal fracture that can be seen below the eagle. The silver ring bezel was solid cast, and has some minute root marking and checkering that is seen mostly under high magnification, and this is normal for a silver ring of this age. The patina is also a light grey, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Overall, this ring is an exceptional large example, can easily be worn today, and is rare example in the market. Another Roman silver ring dated circa 1st-2nd century A.D., with the same type of bezel design and a carved standing Ceres goddess, can be seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, Dec. 1999, no. 118, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates. (See attached photo.) This piece also comes with a ring box for display. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: This piece also comes with additional documentation that is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1031929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek pyxis vessel that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and is a classic ancient Greek Hellenistic form. This piece is approximately 6.2 inches high by 4.25 inches in diameter, and is made of two sections, with a top section that sits on top of the bottom half. The walls of this intact ceramic are very thin, as the piece was fired at a high temperature. Consequently, this ceramic is very durable and the thin walls are very strong, and this suits this piece very well as it was designed to hold precious cosmetics and/or items such as jewelry. This piece was likely used by a woman of some means as it was an expensive piece in antiquity, and it may have also been used as a votive grave offering in order to be used in the afterlife as well. This piece is analogous to many "Attic" type examples, and is known as a "West Slope" type, as this type of ceramic was found on the west side of the Parthenon in Athens. This type of pyxis can also be seen in several Greek museums, including the Pella Museum in Greece. The piece offered here has a very attractive yellow ivy leaf and white berry band, which is a hallmark design of the Athenian ceramic industry, and many of these pieces were made for export. There are also two white decorative circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and a mold pressed roundel medallion that is seen at the top center of the upper lid section. Within this mold pressed medallion, are two standing figures of two lovers embracing, and a standing figure of Eros looking on. (A similar scene is seen on a Canosan terracotta pyxis, circa 3rd century B.C., which is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1987, no.276. See attached photo.) This intact piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in mint "as found" condition. This vessel also has very vibrant colors, has great eye appeal, and is a scarce to rare example. Ex: Ulla Lindner collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1191314
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This exceptional piece is an X-large Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th century B.C. This beautiful large piece is approximately 16.75 inches high by 4.7 inches in diameter. This exceptionally large example is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This is rare for a large scale lekythos to be intact, as they are normally broken at the neck. The neck seen on this beautiful piece extends gracefully upward, and has an attached handle with an open lipped opening. There is also a small round hole in the body seen centered below where the handle attaches to the main body of the vessel, and this was added so that liquid could more easily pour from the vessel. This piece also has original white ground material that is seen on the main body of the vessel, and in addition, there are minute black spotty mineral deposits seen on various sections of the vessel. The main body also gradually tapers down from the upper shoulder to the round base, and this gives this vessel a very elegant shape. This piece also has a flat bottom and this vessel stands very solid as well. Greek Attic white-ground lekythos of this type were used primarily for funeral rites, and often had fine-line figural design over the white-ground surface. These vessels were often placed in the tomb, and were often brought to the tomb as offerings by the family of the dead. The fact that the small round hole was added to the vessel is also a good indication that this piece was actually used in a funeral rite, and was then left as an offering. The vessel seen here is much larger than what is normally seen, is an Attic Greek ceramic with a high degree of eye appeal, and is extremely graceful on display. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1260116
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Minoan culture bronze double-ax, which dates Middle Minoan III-Late Minoan I Periods, circa 1700-1450 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches long by 4.1 inches high, and has an attractive even dark green/brown patina. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, some minute root marking, and is a complete and intact example which is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition. This powerful piece is a hammered bronze piece that is very thin, and is made from two sections that are riveted together with four rivets. These riveted sections also form a central horizontal hole that was used to mount a bronze or wooden rod. This piece is also a votive type piece, as it is made from thin sheet bronze, and is an imitation of a heavy bronze battle ax. The bronze with this piece is also thick enough so it does not bend easily, and the sheet bronze also appears to be nearly the same thickness as the known Cretan bronze helmets that date circa 8th-7th century B.C. These helmets also have minute rivets, and also have a two-part type construction as the votive bronze double-ax offered here. The Lydian word for "ax" is "labrys", as related by Plutarch. The word "labyrinth", derived from the word "labrys", was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the palaces in Crete, such as Knossos, and also referred to the "double-ax" symbol represented by the piece offered here. The symbol of the "double-ax" also always accompanies goddesses, and it seems that it was also the Minoan symbol of the beginning of the creation. This also explains why this piece is votive, and was offered in tombs and sacred places. It is also believed that this type of power piece served as a standard in religious shrines and temples. See F. Schachermeyer in "Die Minoische Kultur des Alten Kreta", 1990, pp. 161, 237, and 238.; and W.H.D. Rouse, "The Double Axe and the Labyrinth, The Journal of Hellenis Studies 21", 1901.; and John Chadwick, "The Mycenaean World", 1976. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1150627
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb Roman bronze is an applique that shows a facing Diana with a bow quiver on her back. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches high. This piece is complete, and shows a facing bust of Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt. She is seen with a bow quiver strapped across her back, with the quiver straps running between her breasts, and is draped with a chiton and an animal skin cloak that is seen hanging from her left shoulder across her left breast. Her hair is tied into an intricate headdress with a large ribbon, and she is seen looking slightly to her left. Her eyes may have been inlayed with silver, precious stones, or more likely, colored pastes. This attractive bust of Diana displays a very serene face, and has very pleasing eye appeal. There is a punched pattern that runs around the flat base frame, and this bottom base frame is in the shape of a crescent moon. This crescent moon frames the bottom section of this bust, and also alludes to this goddess. This piece also has an attachment pin that is seen on the upper back side of the piece. Diana was the Roman equivalent of Artemis, the Greek goddess of the hunt, and for the Romans, Diana was also the goddess of light, mountains, and woods. One of her principle temples in the ancient Roman world was on the shores of Lake Nemi, south of Rome. The piece offered here has a nice light green and brown patina with some red highlights, along with some spotty light brown and white mineral deposits. This piece likely was a decorative element that may have fit on a Roman furniture piece or box. (For the type see Babelon-Blanchet, "Catalogue des Bronzes Antiques de la Bibliotheque Nationale", Paris, 1895, nos. 140 and 176.) This piece was also cast as one piece, and has hand punched and chased details. (Another analogous example is seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 1985, no. 312.) This piece sits on an attractive custom marble and plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C. The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus grade. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric period circa 750-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are conical in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. These beads have an attractive dark green patina, and are all in superb condition. These beads are strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, as well as being votive, and are now scarce in the market. As a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1262510
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This interesting piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 9 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter, and measures 8.75 inches, from the tip of the vulture head to the other tip of the vulture head seen on the opposite side of the vessel. This attractive piece has nice root marking, and some minute black spotty mineral deposits seen on all of the surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also a scarce type with the two extended vulture heads which are seen on opposite sides of the vessel, and the more common vessel of this type, has extended monkey heads. (See attached photo for the monkey head type. This piece is seen in the Museum of Anthropology and History, San Pedro Sula, Honduras and is published in "I Maya di Copan", Skira Pub., Milan, Italy, 1997, page 139, no. 34.) This vessel offered here is intact, and has some very minor stress crack fill which is very difficult to see. This piece has vibrant dark red, black, cream, and orange colors that are seen on the entire outer surface of the piece. The prominent feature of this piece are the two red-headed vulture heads that are seen emerging from each side of the vessel, and their wings and body are stylistically represented below each head on each side of the vessel. These emerging vulture heads are each a vibrant dark red color, which matches the color of this living bird, and these emerging heads also act as handles for this vessel, but this is likely not the primary function of these heads. It's more likely that the Mayan artist wished to emphasize the importance of the vulture in Mayan myth, and created a three-D image of the creature that seems to emerge from the vessel and appears to be alive. There are also two bands that run around the piece, and are seen at the top and bottom section of the vessel. The top band has two boxes, one placed between each vulture head, and within each box is what appears to be another stylized vulture bust showing a section of the wings and head. The bottom band has a red geometric box seen below each stylized vulture body on each side, and there is an identical stylized vulture bust placed between each geometric box. There is also a red line, seen on each side, that acts as dividing line for each side showing the emerging vulture head and painted stylized body. The vulture for the Maya was observed as a death eater. As a consumer of death, the Maya also felt that the vulture could convert death to life, and the vulture was viewed as a symbol of cleansing, renewal, and transformation. As a symbol of renewed life, this type of vessel was likely a Mayan offering vessel that contained a grave good for the afterlife. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This coin is a mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), Thasos silver tetradrachm, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club and cloaked in the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "Herakles"; and below reads "Thasos", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #694678
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This rare Greek bronze ram dates from the Geometric period, circa 750 B.C. This charming piece is intact and is approximately 1.75 inches high by 1.7 inches long. This piece has a nice dark green patina and has spotty light brown/white mineral deposits. This piece is a standing ram, which is a much rarer type than the more often seen standing horse types for the period. The ram for the ancient Greeks represented vitality and wealth, was a favourite sacrificial animal, and was often associated with Hermes, patron deity of shepherds, travellers, and tradesmen. This association with Hermes is a strong indicator that this piece was probably a votive offering in some Greek sanctuary. (For an analogous designed piece see "More Animals in Ancient Art From the Leo Mildenberg Collection", by Kozloff, Arielle and Mitten, David Gordon, Verlag Philipp Von Zabern pub., Mainz, Germany 1986, no.53. The example noted here also has an extended tail, tapered body, and square shoulders as the piece offered here. For another example, see "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XII, 2001, no. 52. Said to be from Thessaly, circa 8th century B.C., 2 inches long. Listed at $4,750.00. Ex: Spencer Churchill collection. ) The complete piece offered here was cast as one solid piece, as were the other two examples noted above, and was made to stand by itself which it does. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1027901
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is a carved jade pendant that is from the Costa Rican region, and dates circa 300 B.C.-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high, and is part of a complete "axe-god" pendant. This piece likely formed a complete piece that was approximately 4.25 to 4.5 inches high, and may have been string cut into three near equal sections. This beautiful dark green jade piece is the upper section of a complete pendant, and is in the form of an avian head. The dark green color is even throughout the entire piece, and is from a high quality section of the stone from which it was cut. This detailed jade head has superb workmanship, and has bow drilled eyes, wing design cuts seen on each side, and a bow drilled hole through the side which the wearer was able to use in order to suspend this piece as a pendant. This piece was worn by the elite as a "power" type piece, and appears to represent either parrots or owls as emphasized by the tufts as seen at the top of the head. This piece is analogous to two examples that are seen in "Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica", Detroit Institute of Art, Abrams Pub., 1981, no.24 and 26. (See attached photos.) This piece also has an unpolished "septum" that is seen at the back of this piece, and was a result of string cutting a stone into three seperate pieces in order to produce three pendants. (For this manufacturing process see, "Precolumbian Jade" by Frederick W. Lange, University of Utah Press, 1993, pp.270-274.) This piece also has some spotty light brown surface deposits that are seen in several low relief points of the piece. This piece is rare, as it was a segment from a complete "ax-god", and this complete and sacred "ax-god" was likely cut into three segments so that each piece could have been given to family members of the prior owner. The piece offered here, subsequently became a votive grave offering, and the "power" of this piece passed from one generation to another. This type of segmented votive piece was also known to have occurred with the Olmec, as evidenced by Olmec hard stone pieces that are published in "The Olmec World, Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, Abrams Inc. Pub., 1995, nos. 158 and 159. (The pieces illustrated are both jade masks that were string cut and/or broken into a section, and was then reworked and repolished. It is unknown whether these masks were broken accidentally or for a ritual purpose, but what is known, these pieces were valued as they were reworked and repolished. See attached photos.) The rare votive piece offered here was also reworked and repolished afer it was cut at the bottom, and this type of votive piece is seldom seen in the market, or in private/public collections. This piece is a superb example of Costa Rican jade. This piece is mounted on a custom stand and can easily be removed. This piece can also be easily worn on a cord as well. Ex: Private Mass. collection. Ex: Arte Xibalba, Osprey, Fl. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: