Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #678982
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a bronze geometric horse that was cast in one solid piece. This attractive piece was made during the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high by 2.8 inches long. This piece is extremely early for the culture, and this can be seen relative to the artistic style with the elongated neck. This piece was probably part of a sacred necklace that may have been votive, and may have been shamanistic in nature. The stylized horse seen here may have been created as a "spirit" type animal, and this may explain the design. The design of the piece is also an early Geometric Period convention of art, and during this period, animals were designed with legs, tails, and necks that were elongated and thin. This piece also has a hoop seen on the top part of the body that connected this piece to the main body of the necklace by a chain. The hoop seen on the top part of the body may also have been broken in antiquity in order to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece, and consequently, this piece may also have been votive. There were probably several animals and/or amulets connected to this type of necklace in antiquity, and the geometric horse pendant offered here is analogous to a piece that is now seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome (Inventory no. 53438, listed as being found at Palestrina, dated circa 8th-6th century B.C.). The bronze animals seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia example are also approximately one third of the size of the piece offered here. The Museo di Villa Giulia piece is a complete necklace, and has long-necked horse pendants, and small round shields that are individually connected to the necklace by attachment chains. The extremely rare piece offered here has a dark green patina with dark red highlights, and the dark red highlights are due to a high concentration of tin within the mix of metals. This piece is complete, except for the incomplete hoop, and it sits into the grooves of a clear custom plexiglas display stand. (Another rare analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, and was published in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 58, $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: F. Hirsch collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to culture, date, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356937
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This flawless piece is a Greek Apulian Xenon-ware kylix that dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This lovely little piece is approximately 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has been attributed to the "Red Swan Group" and it is classified as being "Xenon-ware", which is a sub group of "Greek Apulian" ceramics. This piece has a lustrous black glaze with dark orange painted decorative elements, and features a "high footed base ring". The decorative elements include a red swan facing left, within a "double circular tondo", along with two "three dotted" symbols and a single "ivy leaf" symbol. These symbols are commonly seen on Apulian type ceramics, and may signify the artist in one particular workshop and/or the workshop itself. There are also two laurel wreaths seen on the piece, with one on the inner surface that frames the inner "double circular tondo", and another on the outer surface that runs around the piece. The two handles attached to the piece are upturned, and have some minute stress cracks which is normal for a ceramic of this type, and have no visual repair/restoration. The surfaces have some minute cracking which is also normal, and some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel. The surface also has a preservative wax, which lends this attractive piece it's glossy appearance as well. Overall, an exceptional piece and a high quality example. (An analogous example of the same quality and size was sold by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 396. $1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see Margaret Mayo, "The Art of South Italy, Vases from Magna Graecia", Richmond, Virginia, 1982, no. 160. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1311165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This cute piece is a Roman bronze seated Silenus that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, and is a complete intact piece that has no repair/restoration. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and was cast as one piece. This piece shows a nude drunken and drinking Silenus seated on a rock, and he is holding a kantharos in his left hand, and his right hand is raised with an open palm and raised thumb. This pose with the open palm is also thought to have been a popular gesture used by actors in the Greek and Roman theater. (For a description of these various theatrical poses and gestures see: "The History of the Greek and Roman Theater", by Margarete Bieber, Princeton University Press, 1939.) The Silenus seen here has the typical bald head, pot belly, short legs, and had human and horse attributes. The eyes and facial features are very well detailed, and this piece is a nice example of this mythical creature who was the companion and tutor of Dionysus. This piece also has a round insert below the piece, and this is an indication that this piece may have been part of a group bronze sculpture made from several figurines. This piece also has a small flat section on top of the head, and this may have been designed to support another object and/or figurine as well. A nice Roman bronze with a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa late 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367981
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact and dainty Greek Boeotian Greek kylix dates circa 400-375 B.C., and is approximately 2.6 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This pleasing little piece has black, brown, and dark orange colors which follows the traditional fabric of ancient Greek Attic and Boeotian ceramics for the period. This piece has olive sprigs painted around the outer body of the piece that have brown stems and black olives. There is also a black band above the stemmed base, and a black band under the flat base. The interior of the bowl has a wide outer black band with two circles and a dotted center. The overall shape is very esoteric and is an extremely fine example for the period. This piece is completely intact, and is in superb to mint condition with only some minute stress cracks seen at the base of one of the handles. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and has a high degree of eye appeal. (Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, Catalog 176, 2005, no. 47. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384943
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience amulet is a facing panther head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.2 inches wide from ear to ear, by .4 inches thick, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This intact piece is also a complete example, and is in superb condition, save for some minute stress cracks on the front face, and a small area of glass loss on the lower left back side. This piece has a light green glaze, a flat back, and has a molded and detailed panther head on the front side. A hole runs through the center from top to bottom, and there are two additional mounting holes seen on each side of the center hole at the top of the piece. (The piece offered here is very analogous in artistic style to the carved facing panther head seen on the basalt statue of Anen, who served as an astronomer priest under Amenhotep III, and is now seen in the Turin Egyptian Museum, Italy. See attached photos.) The panther head is a regal symbol, and attached with the panther skin robe with stars, together represented the attributes of an astronomer. Egyptian regal princes were trained in astronomy so that they could predict the rising and falling of the Nile. The piece offered here likely was part of a regal necklace, is one of the rarest Egyptian amulet types, and is not often seen on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand that is included. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1399734
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extra large and impressive piece is a Mayan brownware ceremonial tripod vessel that dates to the Early Classic Period, circa 450-650 A.D., and is approximately 13 inches in diameter, by 9 inches high. This impressive piece is a thick walled light to dark brown terracotta ceramic, that has three "slab type" legs attached to the flat base. This tripod bowl vessel is also somewhat heavy, and the three attached "slab type" legs have identical decorative architectural elements molded onto the outer surface of each leg. There are also three separate impressed panels with decorative elements that are seen on the outer surface of the bowl, and these panels are also identical, as they were made with a stamp that was rolled onto the outer surface of the bowl. These decorative elements show a two-part scene that is divided with a column, and to the right of the column, there is an elaborately attired standing figure with outstretched arms holding implements. The left side of the column shows a "central glyph medallion" flanked by winged motifs and stylized birds seen in profile. The "central glyph medallion" has three dots seen in the center, and this resembles the Mayan glyph meaning "moon". This "central glyph medallion" also appears to be attached to a raised stela that is also seen with three dots at the top. The stylized birds seen in profile at each side of the "central glyph medallion" are also of a raptor type with a hooked beak, and may represent either an eagle of a vulture which were both sacred to the Maya. There is also a stylized wavy band seen below. This type of heavy tripod bowl has strong Teotihuacan influence, and is a type of vessel that the Mayan produced in the Early Classic Period. This piece was often used in ceremony, and likely held an offering such as an agricultural commodity, or even a sacrificial head. A thick black glaze was also added at the bottom of this bowl in order to control a liquid, and this is the only glaze seen on this piece. The number "three" is seen multiple times on this piece with the three separate panels, the three "slab type" legs, the three dots seen within the "central glyph medallion", and the three dots seen at the top of the raised stela; and seen in combination, may have some other hidden ceremonial meaning. This impressive Mayan piece is complete, is 100% original, and has been repaired from several large fragments, as most "large scale" Mayan ceramics of this type have. There is also some minute root marking seen on the inside bottom of the bowl and some spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of the entire piece. An impressive "large scale" ceremonial type vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Palm Beach Atlantic College, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May, 1989, no. 377. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1374604
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This type of piece has been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans, and has also been attributed to a later time frame as being Parthian, as well as Sassanian, because the material and construction techniques of this piece are all attributed to this region and these cultures. This attractive piece is made from a beautiful white and dark brown banded agate stone that is mounted in a gold frame. This attractive frame is also made from a flat plate with seven added granular triangle designs, and an outer and inner twisted gold rope rim band. The back side of the gold frame encloses the sides of the agate stone, and firmly holds it into place. There is also a hoop at the back, as this piece likely hung within a necklace that had additional pieces of this type, and may have been the central component of the overall necklace. A complete necklace of this type is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. (This piece is published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, no. 159. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is scarce to rare for the type, and is seldom seen on the market in this natural "as found" condition. This piece is also very durable, and can easily be worn today. This beautiful piece also hangs on it's custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Davis and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #987545
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian trefoil oinochoe that shows an expressive theatrical mask, which is seen in profile facing right, and dates circa 380-350 B.C. This piece is classified as a "Type II Oinochoe", otherwise known as a "Chous", and is approximately 4.6 inches high. This attractive piece is also intact, and is in superb to mint quality condition with no repair/restoration or overpaint. This extremely rare piece has also been attributed to the "Truro Painter", and has very vibrant colors, which are a glossy black, light red, and white. There are also some heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel, on the edge of the trefoil mouth, and on the bottom base ring. The detailed theatrical mask is seen centered within a light red frame which has a floral design at the bottom, and there are several attractive white dot highlights seen within this light red frame as well. The lively theatrical mask depicted on this piece is a type used by a character in a Greek comedy play known as a "phylax play", and this type of "phylax mask" was designed with bushy black hair, short black beard, open mouth, and copious facial wrinkles. This type of "phylax mask" was defined by Trendall as "Type B", and this type of mask was often produced by the "Truro Painter", circa 380-350 B.C., on Greek Apulian chous vessels of this type. Trendall also stated that the heads of the Truro Painter "often wear white head-bands", and the detailed theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the piece offered here also has a very prominent white head-band. (See A.D. Trendall, "Phlyax Vases", Second Edition, BICS Supplement 20, 1967. Another vessel of this type is seen in the Virginia Museum in Richmond, Virginia, no. 81.53.) The expressive theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the beautiful vessel offered here, and the Virginia Museum vessel noted above, are both designed as a singular depiction, and as such, is a subject type seldom seen on Greek Apulian vessels. In addition, the "phylax mask" seen here on this rare vessel is a sharp detailed example which is seldom seen on the market today. An analogous Apulian chous of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no.195. (Approximately 7.5 inches high, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $12,500.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Donna Jacobs Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, circa 1980's. Ex: Robert Novak collection, St. Louis, MO. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1345828
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This interesting and attractive Mayan cylinder vessel dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.4 inches in diameter at the top rim of the vessel, and is a large vessel for the type. This superb piece is also a "Copador" type designed vessel, and refers to the geographic region where the majority of most of these vessels are found, with the "Cop" referring to Copan, and the "ador", referring to El Salvador. This large example also has very large glyph bands that are seen in the upper third of the vessel, and at the bottom half of the vessel. The upper glyph band has four large black painted identical glyphs, along with a square black painted glyph that denotes the beginning and end of the band. The lower glyph band has two identical red painted glyphs that are seen stacked on one another, and this glyph design is repeated as three identical separate groups that run around the vessel. The identical glyphs seen in the lower band, are also nearly identical to the black painted glyphs seen in the upper band. The two glyph bands are also separated by a black and red line, and are both framed by a red line and red band seen both on the upper rim and base of the vessel. The design of the glyph seen within the "red band", which is also the main glyph sign of the glyph seen within the "black band", resembles the Mayan glyph for "Chak", meaning "red", or "great". The Mayan color "red" also is the color of the rising sun, and signifies and corresponds to the direction "east". It's interesting to note that the predominant Mayan glyph seen on the center of this vessel is rendered in the color red, not orange, or black. (For the glyph and it's meaning, see: "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Pub., New York, 2002, pp. 230-231. See the attached photo of the glyph meaning "red" that is seen on p. 231.) In most cases, glyphs seen on Mayan "Copador" type vessels are usually pseudo-glyphs, and have no meaning, and were created as decorative symbols. The orange, black, and red colors seen on this vessel are also commonly seen on "Copador" type vessels. If the glyphs seen on this vessel are not pseudo-glyphs, then this type of vessel is an extremely rare type of Mayan ceramic. There are also known "Copador" type vessels that have a combination of glyphs that are designed as having a meaning, along with glyphs that are pseudo-glyphs, and it may be that this is the case relative to the superb vessel offered here. This piece also has rather thick side walls, and the vessel has a slight flare as seen from the top to the bottom of the vessel. There are several attractive minute root marks, and some minute black spotty minerial deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. This intact piece also is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and is now scarce on the market in this superb condition with the vibrant orange, black, and red colors. Ex: Private New Mexico collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, Dec. 2010, no. 292. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370580
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce Chavin ceramic is a gray-ware bottle that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 4.8 inches in diameter. This piece is also among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean culture. This exceptional piece also has a finely polished and raised design on each side of the vessel which is a mirror image of one another, and this design is likely a stylized avian such as the raptorial "harpy eagle". One can see the stylized oval incised eye at the bottom of the design, and the two rising "four banded" sectional wings and/or head tufts that rise above into the central body of the vessel. The balance of the main body of the vessel is covered with incised "surface punctations" that were produced by rolling a shell mold over the wet clay. This provided a background for the main design and further enhances the design for the viewer. The graceful raised neck of this interesting piece is also glazed, as well as the flat bottom of the vessel. The raised and incised finely polished design of the stylized raptor, also has design elements that are analogous to some of the elements seen on the so-called "Tello Obelisk", seen at Chavin de Huantar, Peru. There are also theories that the supernatural avian, seen on the piece offered here, was an attendant and/or messenger of a celestial deity, rather than dieties themselves. (See "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson, 1995.) The superb piece offered here is also intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and is an excellent representation for the type. This piece also has some minute root marking, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There are also two minute holes for the TL authenticity samples taken from the inside of the upper lip, and the other is on the flat base of the vessel. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, No. 38R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1398323
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This intact and vibrant piece is a late Byzantine glass weight/game piece that dates circa 7th-9th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately .8 inches in diameter, and has a vibrant dark blue color with applied white trailing highlights. This piece may have been used as weight in a scale that weighed Byzantine coins, and/or it may also have served as a game piece. This piece was made with a hot trailing glass that was spun around the dark blue solid core, and was made as earlier Greek core-formed glass. This piece also has a slightly flat bottom, and easily stands upright. This piece does not have a hole through the center, as beads also produced during this period have, and this piece is a beautiful solid example that can easily be fitted into a modern piece of jewelry. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323832
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb silver tetrobol (four obols) was minted in northern Greece in the fortress city of Olynthos. This beautiful "Classical Period" piece was minted circa 420-400 B.C., and is an early issue for the mint. This piece is superb quality, i.e. good extremely fine condition (EF+/EF+), is approximately 16 mm in diameter, weighs 2.6 gms, and has perfect centering with a light gray patina. The obverse has a bust of Apollo facing left, wearing a wreath, within a dotted border. There is also a Greek delta letter seen behind the bust, and this may indicate the mint master, or possibly be an artist's die signature. The reverse features a lyre, probably representing the lyre of Apollo, with Greek lettering around meaning (Chalkidike), all within an incuse square. Olynthos was the center of the Chalkidian League and issued a series of coins with beautiful heads of Apollo. This "Classical Period" coin shows the early head of Apollo for the series, which is known as the "severe style". This artistic style also best represents "Archaic Period" Greek sculpture. An exceptional high quality coin for this scarce early issue, and has perfect centering with a full dotted border which is not often seen. References: Sear 1425; Robinson-Clement, Group C, no. 24. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1392177
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This appealing piece is an Inka bronze tumi that dates circa 1450-1550 A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high, by 3.6 inches wide, by .15 inches thick. This piece is intact and is in mint quality "as found" condition, and has a beautiful dark green patina. This piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, along with some spotty minute dark green mineral deposits that are adhered to sections of the piece. This piece was cast and then hammered into shape, and has a raised edge border that runs down from the curved blade to the base of the piece. This was added to give this piece some added strength, and shows that this piece was made with a great deal of skill. This tumi was also votive, and was likely added into the wrappings of a mummy, or was simply added into a tomb. This piece was likely a symbolic offering, and was also likely a "trade type" piece which served as a form of trade currency. This piece also represented the power of the Inka Empire, and this type of implement was also used for ceremonial sacrifice. A nice complete example with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: