Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402085
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality Etruscan vessel is a two-handled kotyle type vessel, and dates to the Late Geometric Period, circa 7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a slightly indented rim, two applied strap handles, and a ring base with a flat bottom. This piece was made from a light tan terracotta, and has a light orange/red slip with a banded design seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece also has some spotty light brown and white calcite mineral deposits, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece is an exceptional example for the type, and the Geometric Period banded design is very attractive. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1144158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Aphrodite that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece also has several earthen deposits, and is in its intact "as found" condition. This light tan terracotta figure is a nude Aphrodite, who is seen raising her right arm and holding her drapery behind, and her lower right arm is seen holding or resting on an extended dolphin, with its head pointing downwards. This dolphin may also represent a piece of dolphin-designed furniture. The dolphin seen at her side also refers to the ancient Greek myth of the birth of Aphrodite, as she sprang from the foam of the sea. She is also seen on a rectangular stand, and there is a small round vent hole seen on the back side. This attractive piece was mold made from two seperate halves, and is a typical example of a Greek Boeotian terracotta, but this piece has a totally nude highly erotic pose which is not often seen . This type also is found during the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C., and is sometimes classified as being "Roman", but the example seen here is an early Greek example. Another analogous Greek example, dating circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., of the same size and molding is seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2006, no. 114. ( 500-700 Pound estimates, 840 Pound/$1,512.00 realized.) This piece also stands by itself, and sits on a custom black plexiglas and wooden stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is superb to mint quality "as found" condition, save for some minor glaze loss on one outer section of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #996901
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This pieces dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable in solid condition, as this piece has an earthen over glaze and this piece is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that is in the superb condition seen here. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 10 inches long, and both have a shank-end diameter of approximately .6 inches. The spearpoint has a blade width of approximately 1.2 inches, and the butt-spike has a central width of approximately .45 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a double decorative ring seen mid-point, and the shanks of the spearpoint and butt-spike both have fine workmanship. The butt-spike also has a square design at the tip, and the double ring is the design point where this butt-spike becomes a round shank at the other end. The diameter of this piece is small compared to most iron spearpoints of this type, and this piece was probably used primarily as a throwing javelin, as well as a weapon for close-in fighting by the Greek hoplite. Its known that the Greek hoplite, during the 4th century B.C., carried more than one spear, and this weapon is light enough for this to be the case. The spearpoint and the buut-spike are nearly identical in weight and length, and therefore the javelin was well balanced, and an estimate of this weapon's original length could have been up to about 260cm. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon seen here was one such weapon, as the finest Greek weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. A.M. Snodgrass thought this type of weapon had a dual role for the Greek hoplite as a throwing and stabbing weapon, and also served as the primary weapon of the light armed javelin-throwers (akontistai). (See A.M. Snodgrass, "Arms and Armour of the Greeks", Cornell University Press, 1967, pp. 77-79.) This piece is rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is an iron "grape picker" scythe that dates circa late 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is intact with no breaks and/or cracks, and is a solid intact example which is rare for an iron piece such as this. This complete piece has a heavy and solid dark to light brown earthen coating, of combined earthen and mineral deposits, which has sealed this iron piece from oxygen and deterioration. This piece has a square tang that was embedded into a wooden shaft, and a flat outer edge with an inner edge that was sharpened into an implement that was very efficient. The piece offered here is analogous to an iron "grape picker" that was found in an estate that was known to have produced grapes and wine. (This analogous piece of similar shape and size is published in "Ancient Country Houses on Modern Roads", Pub. Archaeological Receipts Fund, Athens, 2003, no. 318.) The piece offered here likely had many uses, but another use is known, and this piece was adapted into a deadly weapon that was used in battle. This type of piece was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse, and is known as a "grape picker" sickle weapon. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. An image of this type of piece is also seen as a mint mark symbol, and is seen on the reverse of a silver tetradrachm attributed to Alexander the Great, Babylon mint, circa 311-305 B.C. (See attached photo for the reverse of this coin. This coin type is also published in Martin Price, "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991, no. 3768. It is also thought that this coin was minted in Babylon as military pay for the armies of Alexander who were at Babylon at his death in 323 B.C.) It is also very likely that this type of weapon was used by Alexander's armies in his fight against heavy Persian armored cavalry. The piece offered here was also found in a collection of iron spearheads with the same type of patina and earthen deposits. This piece is an example of an extremely rare weapon that also had other utilitarian uses. This piece is also mounted on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389023
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Colima warrior that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 14 inches high. This reddish-brown seated warrior has long youthful limbs, and is seen with the raised right arm balanced on his knee. His cupped right hand perhaps once held an implement, or a lance made from perishable material. This warrior also appears to be in a trance, and has a rounded face with closed "coffee-bean" style eyes. He is also seen wearing a pendant tied around the neck, a headdress/helmet with a small "feline headed" medallion, and raised inlay stone tattoos on the shoulders. The left side of his nude torso is also decorated with a band of black geometric "line-design" tattoos. This piece has very realistic body molding seen on the back side of the vessel, and has a very angular nose. His ears are also pierced for earrings, and overall, this warrior exudes a regal like appearance. This piece was offered for the deceased, and was likely a "protector-type" figurine. The form of this Colima piece is also rare, and the figurine offered here is a rare example that is also known as the "Coahuayana Valley" type. This piece is also intact with no apparent repair and/or restoration, and has some spotty and minute black mineral deposits. A superb large example with a high degree of eye appeal. For the type see: R. Townsend, "Ancient West Mexico, Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past", The Art Institute of Chicago, 1998. Ex: Sotheby's Parke Bernet, Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 165. ($2,200.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2004, no. 268. ($4000.00-$6,000.00 estimates). Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1346703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze amulet that is seen in the form of the Greek goddess Baubo, and dates circa 5th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high by .65 inches wide, and is a complete example with no restoration/repair. This complete piece has a nice dark green patina with some light brown deposits, and is a solid cast example that likely served as a wearable amulet that hung from a necklace. This piece has a suspension hoop seen at the top of the head of the goddess, who is seen nude with her hands on her knees, and is revealing her over-sized vulva. The goddess Baubo was a fun-loving, bawdy, jesting, sexually liberated - yet very wise - goddess who played a crucial role in preserving the fertility of the land in ancient Greece. According to ancient Greek myth, Baubo stopped to rest in the city of Eleusis and had a conversation with the depressed Demeter, who was in deep mourning over the loss of her daughter Persephone who was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter abandoned her duties to bring fertility back to the land, until Baubo began chatting with Demeter using risqué remarks that brought a smile back to Demeter's face. Then, Baubo suddenly lifted her skirt revealing her vulva to Demeter who responded with a hearty belly laugh. Demeter's spirits were uplifted, and she was then able to persuade Zeus to release Persephone, which restored the fertility of the land. The piece offered here may have been worn by a woman, and/or a person who was also connected with the Eleusinian Mysteries. The followers of Baubo believed that enmity could be turned into friendship, and that all people are an integral part of the great cycles of nature. This piece is a scarce to rare example, and is a solid example that can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Prehistorical item #1405428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This piece is an extremely large Vicus/Mochica gold gilt bronze roundel-pectoral that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400-200 B.C., and is approximately 16.2 inches in diameter. This massive piece covered the upper torso of a priest during a religious ceremony, and hung around his neck from three holes seen at the top. This extremely rare bronze roundel-pectoral also has a gold gilt surface on both sides, and had a great deal of powerful eye appeal for the ceremony, as this piece had a bright gleaming presence. The gold gilt is also seen with a light to dark green patina, along with some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This vibrant piece was also likely meant to represent the sun, and played a key role in an important ceremony. The ceremonial costume of this priest likely had additional gold and/or gold gilt additions such as a crown, arm bands, and a cloak. This gold gilt roundel-pectoral may also have had some additional hanging objects to complete the striking look of a ceremonial priest who wore this piece, and he was also likely a regal member of this culture. It's also very likely that this piece was part of a "mummy bundle", as there are also some spotty textile fragments adhered to Side A. (For numerous examples of mummy bundles that display ceremonial priestly and regal regalia see: "The Royal Tombs of Sipan", by Walter Alva and C. Donnan, 1993.) The exceptional and rare piece offered here is also very solid, as it is approximately 3/16 inch thick, and was cast as one piece, and was hand beaten into shape. This piece is also slightly concave, and is not perfectly round as well. (This type of piece was also identified by Christopher Donnan in "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, pp. 166-167, fig. 244, as being held by "Figure B" in a mural at Panamarca. See attached photo. "Figure B" was also identified as being a principle figure in the so-called "Presentation Theme", who is seen holding/wearing a ceremonial disk pectoral, an owl type mask, and is seen presenting a goblet to "Figure A", who is identified as being a high priest.) This massive piece is extremely rare, is seldom seen on the market, and is displayed within a custom 20 by 20 inch shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Judith Small Nash collection, New York, circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Alvin Einbender collection, Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1339434
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This detailed little gem of a piece is a Greek silver infant fibula pin that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.2 inches high, by .75 inches wide. This piece is extremely rare to rare, as it was made for an infant, and it has extremely fine details and workmanship. Ancient Greek silver fibula pins of this type, are seldom seen on the market, and there is the possibility that this type of fibula was more votive in nature. This piece is intact, save for the missing pin, and it is "bow-shaped" with three raised "barrel-type" sections seen within the length of the piece. At the terminal end where the rotating pin was attached, there is a dainty, but detailed acanthus design seen on the front side. The back side of this terminal end is flat, and one can easily discern that this side is the back side of the piece. This piece has a lovely light gray patina, with some spotty dark gray mineral deposits. An analogous example can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, accession number: 52.36. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1351887
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare and esoteric piece is an Olmec seated duck poison bottle that dates circa 1100-800 B.C. This vessel is attributed to the Las Bocas region of Mexico, and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This piece has an attractive lustrous black glaze, along with some spotty light brown burnishing that is seen on all of the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is also in the form of a hollow container, as the top of the head has an opening into the hollow section of the lower body. This type of vessel is also known as a "poison bottle", as they generally held a substance such as red cinnabar or another hallucinogenic powder or liquid. This vessel was likely used in a ceremonial capacity, and this was likely the case for the majority of glazed Olmec vessels that depict birds such as ducks, raptors, and songbirds. (Another analogous "poison bottle" vessel of this type portraying a raptor is seen in "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, 1996, Harry Abrams Pub., no. 61, p. 183. See attached photo.) The esoteric vessel offered here has a very animated face with dotted eyes, and two squat legs and an extended tail that serve as a tripod base for the vessel. There is also a "double dot-and-bar" symbol seen between the eyes, and the eyes also appear to represent dots as well. The "four-dots-and-bar" motif is also thought to represent the "axis mundi", as the conduit between the Olmec natural and supernatural realms, and the two dotted eyes together with the "double dot-and-bar" symbol, may be a representation of the "four-dots-and-bar" motif. The symbolism seen on this piece also reinforces the theory that this piece was created as a ceremonial type vessel. This piece is an exceptional example of Olmec ceramic art, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,800.00
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful and even dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. (See attached photo.) The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. This piece is extremely rare, and so much so, it has also been labeled as "Teotino culture" by some pre-Columbian experts. In addition, this piece has been published as "Nazca (?) culture" by the Sakler Foundation, and has had extensive academic research and testing by their pre-Columbian academics, including Elizabeth Benson and Paul Clifford. The description of this published piece offered here, therefore follows the Sakler academic description as: Nasca (?), Peru, South Coast. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, circa 1970's, accession no. N-110. Published: "Art of the Andes", (As noted above), 1983, no. 143. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1178207
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This piece is a Moche ceramic stirrup-jar that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This interesting piece is approximately 9.75 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and has some light brown burnishing. This piece has light orange/red highlights over a cream colored background, and is a very detailed Moche fineline ceramic. This lively piece shows two detailed and animated "Strombus Monsters", which are seen facing right and are seen on each side of the vessel. These composite creatures are seen wearing a conch shell, from which they are seen emerging, and they display a lively open mouthed pose. These creatures have a striped pelage, a tapering tail, a long-spined main that runs down the length of it's back, and four legs with claws. There are also three eyes that extend from the front of the head. According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.63: "On the snout of the monster are antenna-like objects clearly derived from the land snail. There is a likely explanation for the combination of features on this animal. Since conch shells (Strombus galeatus) were imported from Ecuador, the Moche people probably never saw the creature living inside. They may, however, have made an analogy between the creature they thought inhabited the conch shell and the land snail, which is native to the north coast of Peru." There is an analogous comparable to this vessel that is seen in Sotheby's New York, Arts of Africa, Oceania & the Americas, May 2003, no. 207. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1978-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL document from Gutachten Lab., no. 7579125, dated 11/19/1979, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328373
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This complete Greek bronze is a bronze oinochoe pendant and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This piece was a "votive" type piece and was used as an offering at a temple or an oracle site such as Delphi or Dodona. This piece is in the form of an oinochoe which was used primarily for pouring wine, and as a sacred offering, this piece may have contained a wine offering as well. This piece has an attached strap type handle, and was cast as one piece. The interior is also hollow, and is not a solid example. There are also incised lines that run around the vessel, and these linear lines are a hallmark design feature for Greek bronzes from the Geometric Period. This solid cast piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece has a dark black/brown patina, and there are spotty dark brown mineral deposits seen on the outer and inner surfaces. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed as it is mounted with clay. An interesting piece, as well as an early Greek bronze. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1405826
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This lively piece is a Roman bronze dolphin handle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.25 inches long, by 1.9 inches high. This piece is complete, and is an intact example with no restoration and/or repair. This solid piece was cast as one piece, and has a pronounced upper dorsal fin, a lively twisted tail, and a base tab that the head and snout is attached to. This piece was likely attached to a vessel, such as a large cauldron, and may also have served as a decorative element, as well as a handle. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, and is a superb example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C., and is in nearly Extremely Fine to Very Fine condition (VF+/VF+). The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of a young Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus (VF+) grade. This piece is also perfect for a ring or a pendant. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1399107
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare and extremely large Cycladic "Stargazer" Kilia type marble head dates circa 3300-2500 B.C., and is approximately 3.75 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high. This piece was once part of a complete standing idol, and the dating of these idols is difficult, although it is clear that they belong to the late Chalcolithic Period. This piece is an extremely large example, as most examples are less than half the size of the piece offered here, and as such, is a rare to extremely rare example. This piece was broken at the top of the neck, and has a break at the back of the head, and is a head that is approximately 80% complete. The popular name of "stargazer" comes from the obvious backward tilt of the head, and the small bulging eyes are set rather high. Most of the extremely rare complete idols have been broken across the neck, as seen here, suggesting that these sculptures were ritually "killed" at the time of burial. The exact function of these idols is unknown, but the design of these pieces do evoke a sense of modern design with a simplistic artistic style. This piece has a very defined raised nose, and there is small flat section at the base of this bust where it was attached to the neck of the figure. This piece also has spotty and heavy dark gray mineral deposits; and at the break at the back of the head, along with the neck break at the base of the head, the marble is crystallized with some light gray deposits. The patina seen on the break at the back of the head is also an indication that this extremely large piece was not only broken away at the neck, but is was also ritually "killed" with an extra break at the back of the head. This esoteric piece has a custom display stand which shows this piece as it would have looked attached to the main body of the piece. (For the type see: Takaoglu, Turan. "A Chalcolithic Marble Workshop at Kulaksizlar in Western Anatolia: An Analysis of Production and Craft Specialization", BAR International Series 1358, Oxford Archaeopress, 2005.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384532
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This powerful piece is an early Moche seated dignitary that dates circa 300-100 B.C., and is approximately 7.2 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has a light brown and dark red glaze. This powerful looking piece is a seated dignitary seen with hands placed on the knees with feet crossed below, wearing an incised cap, and has a furrowed face with large eyes and a grinning mouth. The eyes and mouth have a deep recessed design that was likely once inlaid with mother of pearl or shell, and the face conveys a sacred, but powerful image. The back side of this vessel has a raised stirrup handle that has a dark red glaze, along with the back side of the head. This piece also has a flat bottom, and some spotty dark black mineral deposits and attractive dark brown burnishing. (Another analogous example of this piece was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Jan. 2010, Brussels, no. 104. 4500-6500 Euro estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363343
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This lovely piece is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter through the center of the vessel. This piece features an elongated strap handle that is approximately 5.5 inches high, from the top of the handle to where it attaches to the main body of the vessel. This strap handle also has two small, finely worked rivets that attach this handle to the lip of the vessel, and a heart shaped applique, on the other end of the handle, which is attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece has a flat bottom and stands very stable, as this piece is well balanced. This exceptionally well designed piece also has a raised lip that allowed for better control of a precious liquid, such as an oil-based unguent, and this may also have been the primary function of the raised elongated strap handle. This piece likely served as an accessory for a woman's toilet cabinet, and is an extremely rare to rare design with this elongated handle. This piece has a beautiful dark and light green patina with dark red highlights, and has some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and the raised strap handle is remarkably intact and complete. An exceptional Greek bronze vessel that is also a rare type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1404947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This intact piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.2 inches high. This piece has an attractive dark green patina, and some spotty light mineral deposits. This piece was cast as one solid piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods are seen wearing the winged cap known as a "petasus". The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. The figurine seen here is also seen holding a money bag in his extended right hand, and this was to offer the owner of this piece fortune in commerce. This piece also has a square built-in base, and this piece stands by itself. The piece offered here is very simple in design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's also very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a temple or shrine. This piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310457
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic "Red-Figure" kylix that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high, and is 10 inches wide from handle to handle. This superb Attic ceramic is classified as a "Red-Figured, Type C" kylix, and is attributed to the "Painter of London D12", who is a rare Attic painter that is seldom seen on the market. This piece is intact, save for an ancient break in the stem section of the stemmed footed base, and was repaired in antiquity with a bronze and lead pin. It's quite possible that this piece was broken in antiquity while playing the drinking game "kottabos", which was played at a drinking party known as a "symposium". This game was played by spinning the kylix on the index finger in order to fling the wine dregs swirling in the bottom of the cup onto a target in the room. Obviously, many kylix drinking cups were broken while playing this game. The ancient bronze and lead pin is approximately 2 inches long, and reattached the stemmed base to the main body of the piece. One end of the pin can also be seen on the inner surface in the middle of the tondo, and the other end can be seen centered within the stemmed base on the bottom side. The original owner must have thought enough of this attractive piece to have had it repaired for use again. This piece has a seated young man facing right within the round tondo, and is seen wearing a himation (cloak). The facial details of this young man are very detailed, and his pleasing young face is easily seen. The cloak also has curved definition lines, and a single thick black line that defines the garment edge, and both of these artistic features are artistic features of the early 5th century. It's quite possible that this piece may be attributed to an earlier painter such as "Makron", due to the artistic features noted above, rather than a slightly later painter such as the "Painter of London D12". The exterior surface has an even lustrous black glaze, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional piece that is also a scarce example with an ancient repair. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1994, no. 109. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246443
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This esoteric piece is a Roman bronze herm that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece is also complete, and has no restoration/repair. This piece has the typical Roman herm design, which is a square designed lower body, small square side handles that are seen just below the shoulders, and an attached bust seen at the top. The design of this attractive bronze is an imitation of a large marble or bronze sculpture, which was normally erected in front of private homes as a "protector type" object. The piece offered here was likely part of a private shrine that was inside of a private home or temple. What makes the design of this piece not so typical, is the realistic and young satyr head which has a young, sweet appearance. The head is very detailed and is seen slightly tilted to the right, and the thin neck, detailed hair, and upturned horns seen on the upper forehead is very esoteric. An analogous type/example is seen in Bonham's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 298. (800-1000 Pound estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a scarce example, as it has great artistic style and eye appeal. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can be easily removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional information is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" lidded mug that dates circa 340-320 B.C., and is approximately 8.2 inches high with the lid, by 4.6 inches in diameter. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen in the top center of the lid, and there is a single female bust, along with a detailed floral and acanthus pattern. There is also a large female bust seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with floral patterns, and a large acanthus pattern below the single "double-ribbed" handle. This goddess is also seen wearing a detailed white and yellow sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with a "dotted and cross" pattern, an elaborate earring, and a dainty white dotted necklace. Her facial features are very pleasing, and she also seems to exude serene eternal youth. This portrait type is commonly known as the "Lady-of-Fashion", and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. The Greek myth of Persephone's abduction and return from the underworld gave rise to the belief that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. The piece offered here is a much better example than what is usually seen on the market, due to it's mint quality condition, vibrant colors, and superb artistic style. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and has a nice dark even black glaze. An analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Sept. 2010, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, no. 142. ($4500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The mint quality piece offered here also has superb artistic style, and is not often seen on examples of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Illinois collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1397646
Apolonia Ancient Art
$485.00
This piece is a complete and superb Byzantine reliquary bronze ring that dates circa 8th-10th century A.D. This ring is approximately ring size 10, and has an approximate .85 inch inner diameter. This ring was worn by an adult man or woman, and is a rather large ring, as the upper bezel section of this ring was designed with a raised round hollow container. This piece is known as a "reliquary type" ring, as this container held a religious artifact such as parchment, wood slivers, or a pebble from a religious site. In some cases, these rings symbolically held a spirit, and were made at a religious pilgrimage site such as Jerusalem. The piece offered here has no noticeable object that may be contained within, but it is clear that this piece was worn by a very religious individual. This piece also has a detailed olive leaf pattern seen within the round hoop, and there are added braces that attached this hoop to the lower face of the raised round container. The top face of this attractive piece has two granular circles that frame a raised inner circle with a central raised dot. This ring also has a superb dark green patina, and this ring is intact, is very solid, and can easily be worn today. A superb example for the type, and a nice Byzantine religious object. A custom ring box is included, as well as a small hard case display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385356
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek "Xenon ware" kantharos, and dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Greek Apulian pottery from southern Italy that also has Greek mainland attributes. This attractive piece has a beautiful deep black glaze, a ring base, looped handles, and a dark orange painted box on each side that features various ivy tendrils and wave designs. There is also some nice minute spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on this mint quality vessel that has no repair and/or restoration. This vessel is scarce in this condition, and is a better example that what is usually seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1181942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This interesting and lively Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This mint quality piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and minute root marking seen on the upper end of the spout and near the lower base of the vessel. This piece has a lively running deer, seen on each side of the vessel, and each deer faces a central dividing "double-bar" symbol which is seen at the front of the piece. This "double-bar" symbol may also represent a sacrificial "tumi", but more likely it simply is a "tie symbol", with a rope and/or cloth tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated Figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or scarifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". The dark red lively running deer are seen against a cream background, and are vibrantly portrayed with an upturned tail, a "floral-leaf" designed ear, an antler reaching forward at the top of the head, and a protruding hanging tongue. This piece also has a conical projection from the the top of the vessel, along with a seated frog that is seen centered at the top within a red fineline petal design, and the conical projection has an attached red stirrup handle seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial sacrificial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb I, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp. 96-97, fig. 10. See attached photo.) The ceremonial sacrificial club also is associated with the "tie symbol" and the lively running deer seen on this vessel, as they may represent deer that are portrayed as being part of a Moche ceremonial deer hunt. According to Christopher Donnan in "Deer Hunting and Combat", seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru", Thames and Hudson, 1997, p. 54-55: "Deer are known to run with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. No other animal in Moche art is shown in this way. Deer are known to run with their tongues out when they are winded or tired, and the artists may have intended to show them in this state. Moreover, when a deer is killed, the tongue will often drop out the side of the mouth through a gap that exists between the deer's incisor and molor teeth. In Moche deer hunting scenes, hunters consistently wear elaborate clothing, headdresses, and ornaments-attire that is altogether unsuited to the stalking and killing of deer. To understand why they are dressed this way, it is useful to consider the ethnohistoric records describing the great hunts practiced by the Inca. The best account is of a hunt held by the Inca ruler, Manco Inca, near the valley of Jauja in honor of Francisco Pizarro around 1536. On that occasion, 10,000 Indians formed a ring around an area 30 to 60 miles in circumference. They then closed toward the center, driving all the animals in the area before them, and forming several concentric rings as their circle grew smaller. When the circle was small enough, designated hunters entered it and killed as many animals as was desired." It's also quite possible that the deer seen on this vessel are portrayed at the point when they were ceremoniously killed, and that they were killed primarily for their blood for it's use in ceremony. In addition, the "floral-leaf" designed ear may also represent a deer's ear that has been engorged with blood from stressed running. The Moche placed a great deal of importance to the deer hunt, and the piece offered here shows artistic features that point to this fact. This mint quality piece is a scarce example of Moche fineline ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 279006, dated July 6th, 1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249675
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche seated man that is Moche IV Period, circa 450-550 A.D., and is approximately 8.3 inches high. This interesting piece is intact, save for a minute filled stress crack in the upper stirrup-handle, and is in superb condition with vibrant dark red, light brown, and cream colors. This piece is a seated Moche man who is dressed with regal ear flares, a wrapped headdress, a dark red back sack, and a cream colored tunic. The individual portrayed here does appear to have some social status in a regal or religious context, as he is seen finely dressed, and he is also seen holding a ceramic in each hand which may point to a ceremonial activity. This individual displays a pronounced facial deformity, which was also held in high regard by the Moche, as this was thought to be a sign from the gods. Special status and sacredness may have been accorded to those who suffered diseases and other physical handicaps. The pronounced deformed face of this individual has skin drawn tight over the bones, and is likely the result of a tropical disease. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture, and the piece offered here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture. Moche ceramics that are medical related, and depict individuals with diseases and/or deformities such as this piece, are rare to extremely rare. Another analogous example that portrays a deformed face is seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., by Kathlenn Berrin, San Francisco, 1997, no. 69. (See attached photo. This portrait-head type vessel seen in the Larco Herrara Museum may also be a portrait of the same individual as seen on the ceramic offered here. Both pieces have analogous features and are both Moche IV Period.) The individual seen here with the deformed face and diminutive nose was likely caused by a tropical disease known as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symtoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasel septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring. (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) The piece seen here likely displays the disease noted above, rather than a battle injury, or a ritualistic mutilation, but whatever the case, this interesting piece is an extremely rare Moche vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1308509
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Greco-Roman bronze bust of a bald grotesque figurine that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1 inch high, and is a superb example with a nice even dark green patina. This piece was likely a bottle stopper and/or may have fitted into a long-necked glass or bronze vessel. The bottom of the stem appears to have been broken, and this piece may have had a longer stem that could have extended down into the vessel. This piece may also have had gold or silver gilt, and may possibly have been a garment or hair pin. Regardless of what this piece could have been, it was certainly made to have been seen, and the bald head and deformed features of this "grotesque bust" is very noticeable. This interesting piece has ears that are lop-sided, with one higher than the other, deep sunken eyes, and a very a very large nose. This portrait may also represent an actual individual that was born with these deformities, and may have been created to represent an actual person rather than a fantasy individual. It is also possible that this deformed person may have been the subject of a play, and may have represented a type of actor. An analogous piece with a near identical portrait, and described as a "Dancing Grotesque of Mine", is seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World", by Mittien and Doeringer, Fogg Art Museum Pub., 1968, no. 122. (This published piece has an identical portrait as the piece offered here, and is bald except for a lock at the crown. This near nude figurine is also posed in a vigorous dance, and is a dancer that likely held castanet-like clappers. This piece is also described as having "contorted contours and exaggerated features which embody the Hellenistic love of caricature", and is "allegedly from Alexandria". See attached photo.) The portrait seen on this published piece, and the piece offered here is nearly identical, and both pieces were likely produced in an Alexandrian workshop. The rare piece offered here also sits on the custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1182861
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Greek bronze finger ring that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7.5, and likely was made for a young man or woman. This piece has a flat face, with a beveled back face, and an attached ring hoop. This intact piece is very solid, is in superb to mint condition, and can easily be worn today. The back beveled face also allows this piece to easily slip on and off the finger. There is some slight wear to the back face, and this is a good indication that this piece was worn by a living person, and simply was not solely a votive object. This piece has sharp engraving, and the engraved composition has detailed deep relief. This piece shows a flying Nike facing left, and a seated draped woman below who may represent Ledo. The flying Nike was the Greek god of victory, and this example has wings above and is holding a victory wreath in front. The Nike is in the act of crowning the victor with the wreath, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on Hellenistic coinage and objects. The seated woman who may represent Leto, made love to Zeus, and she bore him the great archer-deities Apollo and his sister Artemis. The combination of these two symbols seen on this ring is very powerful, and likely offered the wearer "victory in life". This attractive ring may have been used used a personal signet seal ring as well, as it makes a sharp impression. (See the attached photos showing the ring impression that was done in soft clay.) This ring has a nice dark green patina with some minute dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is a superb example for the type, and is a scarce example. (For the type, see J. Spier, "Ancient Gems and Finger Rings", Malibu, 1992, no. 85.) A custom ring stand is included. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356955
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This interesting piece is an Etruscan red-figure stemmed plate that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.45 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has been classified as being from the "Genucilia Group", and the group name derives from an example that had the Etruscan name "P. Genucilia" inscribed under its stemmed foot. This piece also has been described as a "star plate", as noted by Prof. Mario Del Chiaro in "Etruscan Red-Figure Vase Painting at Caere", University of California, 1974. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on the top side of this piece also resembles a "star burst". The "wave pattern" seen on these vessels are also known to have only five of these "points" as well, and why there is generally a "five pointed wave pattern" seen on these vessels is unknown. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on this piece frames a young goddess facing left that is seen wearing long earrings and a sakkos over her hair. The sakkos has "X patterns" within, and the entire composition is done with a dark black polychrome over a light tan terracotta. This intact piece has a raised stemmed base, and has some spotty white calcite and mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the vessel. The bottom of the vessel has several old collection numbers seen including: "P401", "1026", and "Lot 60, Gray Coll., Sotheby's, June 88". This piece also has two "X" graffiti marks seen on the top side inscribed over the face of the young goddess. This piece was also used as an offering plate in sanctuaries, and the "X" pattern graffiti, along with the "X" patterns seen within the sakkos design, may also indicate the workshop where this piece was made and/or the artist who produced this piece. The overall design of this piece makes this a very interesting ancient ceramic, and is rare in this intact condition with vibrant painted images. (Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2011, no. 233. 800.00-1,200.00 Pounds estimates, 2125 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1988. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1325875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads, along with a jade "Celt-God" pendant, which is also known as an "Ax-God" pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the "Celt-God" pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inches wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and pendant were "bow-drilled", with a hole created from drilling at each end. The beads are also a combination of different types of jade and jade-type stones, with some darker in color than others. The pendant shows "line-cut" design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. One can see design "line-cut" work that looks like an open mouth and head at the top of the pendant. The back side is flat, and the "line-cut" design is seen on the concave front side. There is also minute mineral deposits and root marking seen on the pendant and most of the beads, and most, if not all of the beads appear to be ancient, and have mineral deposits and patina. These pendants had magical properties, and were worn as personal adornments which also conveyed that status and rank of the owner. The "Celt-God" pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is also explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Pre-Columbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993, p. 278, Fig. 21.9 (b), and this type of celt is classified by Lange as being a "crouching figure" type (See attached photo). This piece can also be worn as is, and can also be displayed in the included custom display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1397562
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze "Tabula Ansata" military plaque that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.4 inches long, by 1.2 inches high, by 1/8 inches thick, and has an exceptional dark green patina with spotty dark brown/red highlights. This piece is rectangular shaped, and was made from a sheet of bronze cut in a "Tabula Ansata" format, which was a tablet with dovetail handles at each end. This type of format was also a favored shape in Imperial Rome for creating votive markers, and "Tabula Ansata" simply means "tablet with handles". Roman bronze military tablets/plaques of this form have also been found with the remnants of leather covers of soldier's shields at Vindonissa, a Roman legion camp at the modern town of Windisch, Switzerland. The example offered here has a hole at each end, and within are remnants of iron rivets, in addition to, an iron rectangular plate seen on the backside of each rivet that fastened the plaque to leather, or some sort of other material. There is also some remnants of this material seen between the plaque and the iron rectangular plates as well. This attractive piece also has five lines of engraved text that reads: VIHANSAE-Q.CATIVS.LIBO.NEPOS.-CENTVRIO.LEG.III-CYRENAICAE.SCV-TVM.ET.LANCEAM.D.D. This piece likely refers to a Roman centurion whose name and title is seen on the first two lines of the plaque, and was a member of the famed Legion III, Cyrenaica, which was first formed by Mark Antony in Alexandria, Egypt circa 35 B.C., and was under his direct command along with his ally, Cleopatra VII. Elements of this legion were also known to have fought in the "First Jewish-Roman War", circa 66-70 A.D., and was one of the principle legions that besieged the city of Jerusalem. Vespasian, Proconsul of Africa, led this campaign, and subsequently, this legion also accompanied Vespasian back to Alexandra, circa 69 A.D., in the "Year of the Four Emperors", and proclaimed Vespasian emperor while also controlling the grain supply to Rome. Vespasian was quickly sworn in as emperor while still in Egypt in December circa 69 A.D. This legion also was known to have participated in yet another Jewish war, the Bar Kokhba revolt, circa 132-136 A.D. Elements of this legion were also known to have been along the Danube River, circa 84-88 A.D., the Parthian frontier under Trajan, circa 120 A.D., and again the Parthian frontier under Lucius Verus, circa 162-166 A.D. It's also likely this legion was involved in the fighting with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra circa 262-267 A.D., and over time, this legion was perhaps one of the most traveled Roman legions in Roman history. This piece is a remarkable Roman military object seldom seen on the market, and sits on a custom display stand. For the type see: Elizabeth Meyer, "Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World: Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice", Cambrige University Press, 2004. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1311165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This cute piece is a Roman bronze seated Silenus that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, and is a complete intact piece that has no repair/restoration. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and was cast as one piece. This piece shows a nude drunken and drinking Silenus seated on a rock, and he is holding a kantharos in his left hand, and his right hand is raised with an open palm and raised thumb. This pose with the open palm is also thought to have been a popular gesture used by actors in the Greek and Roman theater. (For a description of these various theatrical poses and gestures see: "The History of the Greek and Roman Theater", by Margarete Bieber, Princeton University Press, 1939.) The Silenus seen here has the typical bald head, pot belly, short legs, and had human and horse attributes. The eyes and facial features are very well detailed, and this piece is a nice example of this mythical creature who was the companion and tutor of Dionysus. This piece also has a round insert below the piece, and this is an indication that this piece may have been part of a group bronze sculpture made from several figurines. This piece also has a small flat section on top of the head, and this may have been designed to support another object and/or figurine as well. A nice Roman bronze with a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa late 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This exceptionally large piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very thick on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383326
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Greek blackware kylix that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 10 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a deep lustrous black glaze on the inner and outer surfaces, save for the bottom of the raised ring base that has an unglazed section known as the "reserve" section, and this is a light red terracotta. This attractive piece has an impressed "star pattern" with four acanthus leaves in the bottom center of the bowl, along with two curved handles that are solidly attached to the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits with a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, and overall, is in it's natural "as found" condition. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce piece is a Colima effigy deer vessel that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.5 inches long, by 6.5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This exceptional Colima vessel depicts a standing deer, with the sides of the body decorated with incised panels that frame two doubled-headed spiders. In addition, there is an incised diamond pattern seen on the frontal shoulders below the raised neck. The head is designed with a pointed nose and peaked ears, and there is a broad spout that forms the tail. This piece has a thin reddish-brown glaze, and some minute tan earthen deposits. This type of vessel is scarce to rare, as it depicts a standing deer, rather than the usual Colima dog types. (For the type see: "Fine Pre-Columbian Art from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Wray, Harmer Rooke galleries, Oct. 9, 1984-Jan. 1985, no. 112.) The piece offered here may also represent a sacred "protector type" piece that was made for the after-life. Ex: Private Florida collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1991, New York, no. 365. ($1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates, $1,100.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the Sotheby's information that describes this piece as an "effigy deer figurine".) .I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This piece is an intact and attractive Daunian askos that dates to the 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10 inches long, by 8.3 inches high, by 9 inches wide through the center of the vessel. This intact piece has no repair/restoration, is in mint "as found" condition, and in addition, it is also a thick-walled ceramic which lends this vessel a great deal of durability. This piece was likely used to hold a liquid such as wine, and was designed for pouring, with the strap handle seen at the top, and the elongated neck at one end of the vessel. There is also an interesting "wavy-line" symbol seen on the piece which may be a representation for water. This piece also has a decorative raised "duck-tail" element at the other end of the vessel, and the entire vessel was likely designed to resemble a sitting duck. This piece also has attractive light brown geometric "line designs" that run around the vessel, and ceramics attributed to the Daunian culture, that was centered in northern Apulia in southern Italy, also resemble earlier Etruscan "Duck-askoi". The piece offered here also has some spotty light tan mineral deposits, along with some attractive root marking. This piece is also slightly larger than what is normally seen, and is a nice example for the type. For a comparable piece see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1983, no. 147. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1389309
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This scarce piece is an Etruscan Black Ware bucchero vessel stand that dates to the mid 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches in diameter at the top rim, and is 2.8 inches high. This interesting ceramic also has a deep lustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, and is known as a "bucchero" type ceramic. This piece has an indented round depression seen at the top, and this likely held a glass vessel, or a vessel such as an aryballos with a rounded bottom. This piece also has a raised stem on a round flat base, and the entire piece is very durable, as it is thick-walled. This vessel also has an old inventory tag attached to the bottom showing the "No. 38", and "Orvieto", which was one of the major Etruscan cities from antiquity. This piece is intact, and has exceptional surfaces with some minute root marking and spotty white mineral deposits. A scarce type vessel not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This attractive and extremely rare piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of extremely large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1392002
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a Huari bowl that dates to the Middle Horizon period, circa 550-1050 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high, by 6.8 inches in diameter, and has white, black, dark orange, and dark red colors. This interesting piece has a flat bottom and an oval opening at the rim. This piece has a mirror image design that appears to be a "jugate-designed" type image, which are two heads back-to-back with a shared central white eye. This image also likely represents a sacred mythical creature that could be part feline, as there are also black dots seen within the design that could represent jaguar spots. There are also two raised bands that rise above the main design, and in addition, there are white and black dots that frame the entire image which may be celestial in nature. There is a "key pattern" that forms a ground line, and they also divide the vessel into two halves, along with a "chevron" pattern that is a hallmark design seen on Huari ceramics. This vessel could have been used in a sacred ceremony, and may also have served as a seed storage jar. This piece also has an ancient repair, as indicated by two bow-drilled holes that held a cord wrapping which held a crack together. This piece is complete, and has some minor crack fill seen mostly at the base that was done 30 plus years ago. This piece also has some attractive spotty white calcite deposits seen on the inside and outer surfaces. An interesting piece that has a very complex design. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364645
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This nice piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the mid 5th century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.5 inches in diameter. This piece is in superb condition and is intact, save for a minor crack repair at the base of the vessel which is normal for a large vessel of this type. This attractive vessel has a trefoil spout, and a graceful upper shoulder that extends up from the rounded flat base. There is a heavy looped handle attached to this vessel, and was cast as one piece. This interesting handle was also designed so that the vessel could be suspended from a cord from the raised loop. The lower end of this heavy vertical handle terminates with a thick "ivy-leaf" that is attached to the side of the vessel. There are also two small openings, on each side of the handle near the upper rim, where the cord was attached, and these small openings could also have supported a hinged lid. This piece was also hand beaten from one solid sheet of bronze over a series of molds. This piece also has a beautiful dark to light green patina, with dark blue highlights, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece also easily stands upright, as it has a flat bottom, and the heavy handle was also designed into the upper center of the vessel. (A bronze hydria, dated to circa 450 B.C., with thick "ivy-leaf" terminating handles is seen in the Goulandris Collection in "Ancient Greek Art", Athens, 1996, no. 258. See attached photo.) This scarce vessel is an exceptional example for the type, and is also much rarer than ceramics of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389637
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a black glazed Colima seated shaman that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 10.8 inches high. This pleasing piece has a deep black lustrous glaze over the entire piece, and is scarce as such, as most Colima examples of this type have a red to reddish brown glaze. This seated shaman is seen gesturing with a left upraised arm, and this arm also forms an open spout. This lively shaman is also seen with his right hand placed on his thigh, "coffee-bean" type eyes, an extended nose, and a serene expression. He is also seen wearing a linear patterned lion cloth that is designed with detailed white incised lines, and these incised designs are seen on both sides of the body. In addition, he is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, and a tall "turban-helmet" with a raised horn that also has side straps that are seen falling to the shoulders. This piece was also likely created as a "protector" type piece, and was an individual that had magical powers. This piece is intact, save for a re-attached left leg, and is 100% original. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example, as it has great detail with the incised decorative elements, and the black glaze that is seldom seen. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1989, no. 100. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #853880
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare vessel is from the Moche culture, that dwelled in modern day northern Peru, dates circa 500-700 A.D. and is from the Moche IV phase of ceramic development. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, is in mint quality condition, and is approximately 8.25 inches high. This red-brown and cream colored ceramic is a rare piece, as it is a type of vessel known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". This piece has six figures on the vessel including a Moche standing owl deity seen at the center, a sea lion, a cormorant, a hooded male figure, an ocean skate(?), and a crab. All of the five figures that run around the main body of this stirrup-type vessel are all seen emerging from the background, and may represent their emerging into or from the spirit world. These figures are seen in high relief from the main body of the vessel, as they were individually mold made, and this production process took a great deal of skill and time relative to intregrating these images into the production of this ceramic. The standing owl deity seen at the center, which may also represent a priest in costume, is also the Moche deity that is seen in the "Presentation Theme", which is a Moche ceremony of sacrifice as defined by Christopher Donnan. (See "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, pp.158-174.) This Moche owl deity, seen in the "Presentation Theme" as defined by Donnan which is also identified as "Figure B", is a priest seen in an owl-hooded costume holding a goblet with blood from the sacrifice. There are also other known Moche ceramic vessels that portray this figure, as seen in the work noted above (Nos. 248 and 271.). The owl was sacred to the Moche because of it's night vision and sharp hunting skills at night, and because of their nocturnal nature, they were associated with death and were thought to travel between the living and spirit world. There are examples of Moche ceramics with a captive tied to the back of the owl, and this may represent the owl carrying the captive to the other world. The standing owl, seen in combination with the five figures that run around the main body of this vessel, are all related to Moche ceremony and sacrifice. The active red-brown sea lion depicted on this piece shows several round objects, seen at the front of the eye and on the stomach area, and are round stones that the sea lions frequently cough up when they are hunted. These stones were considered sacred by the Moche and were thought to have extremely powerful medicinal properties. The lively artistic style of the sea lion is exceptional, and has a great deal of expression. The hooded male figure, seen at the front of the vessel, may represent a sacrificial victim. It is interesting to note that one of the owl's feet appear to grip and morph into the hood that is seen on the male figure that is placed just below the body of the owl. The crab is also interesting in that the crab has anthropomorphized human-like eyes. The owl is also thought to represent the "magical flight" ecstatic trance state that was performed by Moche shamans and priests. The owl seen on this vessel also has a human designed eye, and may represent a shaman and/or priest in costume, or is in a state of transformation. (This ecstatic trance state was first described in 1638 by Antonio de la Calancha, in the historical Spanish document "Cornica Moralizada del Orden de San Augustin en el Peru, Con Sucesos Egemplares an esta Monarquia", Barcelona, Spain.) The ceramic offered here may represent the owl as presiding over the Moche sacrifices that are offered to the other world, due to the many attributes of the Moche owl deity as noted above, and as such is known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". (One of the few examples of this type of vessel was offered by Arte Primitivo, New York, June 2005, no. 329, $12,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates. The vessel offered by Arte Primitivo is also red-brown and cream colored, 10.5 inches high, and is Moche IV phase. See attached photo.) Ex: S. Benger collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388722
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Greek terracotta of a nude Aphrodite, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.75 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas stand. On the stand it is approximately 8 inches high. This esoteric piece was mold made, and was finished with detailed sculpting. This piece is a nude Aphrodite that is portrayed emerging from her bath, and this beautiful piece was modeled after the renowned 4th century B.C. masterpiece known as the Cnidian Aphrodite by Praxiteles, who in portraying the goddess as she emerges from her bath, epitomized the ancient ideal of feminine sensuality. Kozloff and Mitten commented in "The Gods delight, The Human Figure in Classical Bronze, p. 106", that the universal attraction of this pose can be summarized in the psychology of the experience from that of the viewer, in that: "the viewer became, in essence, a voyeur, allowed to behold something that was at once enticing and forbidden." Kozloff further elaborates: "from each point of view, a special aspect of her beauty is stressed; the face from the left, the buttocks from the back, the breasts from the right, and the pelvis from the front. Her gestures are decorous, and her pose is convincingly self-protective." The Aphrodite offered here is also seen crouched down while looking away to see if she was seen emerging from her bath. Her hair is also pulled back into a bun, which is also very detailed. Her nude body is also perfectly molded, and there are few Hellenistic Greek terracottas that are completely nude, as most are draped to some degree. This piece is also intact and is complete, save for sections of her missing arms and her lower extremities. Overall, this esoteric piece is of a type that is seldom seen on the market, and displays exceptional artistic style. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic black-glazed lekythos that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This piece is in mint condition, with no repair/restoration, and is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This piece is near gem quality, as the lustrous deep black glaze is nearly flawless, and the surface of this piece has an even deep black color with a thin multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a beautiful esoteric design, with a gadrooned body with a pattern of incised grooves in the handle zone, and a small rouletted molding at the junction of the shoulder and the flared neck. This piece also has a small flat foot, and a black dotted circle underneath on the bottom. The overall design of this piece also has a geometric esthetic, as the height is equal to the diameter. The flared neck was also designed for greater control pouring the liquid that was held within, and this was likely a precious oil, and the short neck design also made pouring liquid from this vessel very precise as well. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2002, no. 243. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, approximately 3.5 inches high. See attached photo.) An additional analogous vessel was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2006, no. 134. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $3,750.00 realized.) This type of Greek Attic black-glaze ceramic is scarce in this exceptional condition, and is rarely seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: