Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in the ancient Near East. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece may also have been a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384532
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This powerful piece is an early Moche seated dignitary that dates circa 300-100 B.C., and is approximately 7.2 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has a light brown and dark red glaze. This powerful looking piece is a seated dignitary seen with hands placed on the knees with feet crossed below, wearing an incised cap, and has a furrowed face with large eyes and a grinning mouth. The eyes and mouth have a deep recessed design that was likely once inlaid with mother of pearl or shell, and the face conveys a sacred, but powerful image. The back side of this vessel has a raised stirrup handle that has a dark red glaze, along with the back side of the head. This piece also has a flat bottom, and some spotty dark black mineral deposits and attractive dark brown burnishing. (Another analogous example of this piece was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Jan. 2010, Brussels, no. 104. 4500-6500 Euro estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278504
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This rare piece is a Roman iron javelin head that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, and is a complete example. This piece has a barbed "spiked tang" head at the end, and a rounded lead weight attached to the shaft about 3.5 inches from the end of this formable weapon. This piece has an exceptional dark brown patina, is in superb condition, and is preserved with a wax sealant which has preserved the iron shaft. There are also some spotty dark brown and white calcite mineral deposits seen mostly on the lead weight. This weapon was also known as a "hasta plumbata", meaning "leaded spear", or as referred to by the ancient source Vegetius, as a "martiobarbalus", meaning "Mars-barb". (See Vegetius, "Epitoma Rei Militaris", translated by N.P. Milner, Liverpool University Press, 1993.) Another ancient source, the "De Rebus Bellicus", M.W.C. Hassall and R.T. Ireland (eds), 1979, Oxford, describes the "plumbata Mamillata", meaning "breasted javelin", as a javelin with a lead weight and a pointed iron head, with flights attached to the opposite end of the shaft. The epithet 'breasted' likely refers to the bulbous lead weight. This lead weight was also molded onto and around the iron shaft, and was solidly attached to the shaft. This type of weapon is rare, as only a few examples have been recovered from the British Isles, notably Wroxeter; and even fewer examples have been found in Germany, notably Augst and Castell Weissenberg, and Lorch, Austria. However, the ancient source Vegetius, (1.17), does state that two Illyrican legions were renamed "Martiobarbuli Ioviani" and "Martiobarbuli Herculiani" by the joint emperors Diocletian and Maximianus because of their proficiency with this weapon. He further states that five "plumbatae" were carried by a soldier in the concavity of his shield, and they were thrown at first charge, or used to defend with the reserves and could penetrate the body or foot of the assailant. This weapon was also thought to easily penetrate shields because of the lead weight, and could be thrown at great distance. Vegetius, (1.17), further states that soldiers using the "plumbata" take the place of archers, "for they wound both the men and the horses of the enemy before they come within reach of the common missle weapons". This weapon was truly an innovation in Roman battle tactics, and is a weapon that is seldom seen on the market today, as it was made from iron which easily deteriorates in mineralized soils. Another rare piece of this type is seen in "The Late Roman Army" by Pat Southern and Karen Dixon, Yale University Press, 1996, p. 114, Fig. 46. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367981
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This intact and dainty Greek Boeotian Greek kylix dates circa 400-375 B.C., and is approximately 2.6 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This pleasing little piece has black, brown, and dark orange colors which follows the traditional fabric of ancient Greek Attic and Boeotian ceramics for the period. This piece has olive sprigs painted around the outer body of the piece that have brown stems and black olives. There is also a black band above the stemmed base, and a black band under the flat base. The interior of the bowl has a wide outer black band with two circles and a dotted center. The overall shape is very esoteric and is an extremely fine example for the period. This piece is completely intact, and is in superb to mint condition with only some minute stress cracks seen at the base of one of the handles. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and has a high degree of eye appeal. (Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, Catalog 176, 2005, no. 47. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1276507
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This rare piece is a Greek Attic "black-figure" alabastron that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, by 2.3 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece has four black bands, with light tan reserve sections seen between, that run horizontally around the piece from top to bottom. This piece is also designed with a wide, flat disk at the top which is a design feature that helped control the flow of liquids from the piece. This piece likely held a precious olive oil, or a perfume-type unguent with an oil base. This piece also has a black "line design pattern" that is seen on the upper third of the main body of the vessel, and this "line design pattern" also runs around the piece. This pattern is often referred to as a "net pattern" which usually is seen with straight lines, but the pattern seen here is seen with overlapping "u-shaped" sections that resemble overlapping scale armor, and there is a strong possibility that this is likely what this pattern is meant to represent. This piece was created at about the time of Athen's victory over the Persians at Marathon circa 490 B.C., and shortly after the stunning Athenian victory, Pheidias designed a massive bronze statue on the Parthenon referred to as the "Athena Promachos", meaning "Athena who fights in the front line". According to Pausanias, this warrior Athena was complete with a helmet, spear, and a scale armor cuirass which also displayed a facing head of Medusa. This image of the warrior Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass is also often displayed on Athenian "black figure" and "red figure" ceramics during the first quarter of the 5th century B.C. The "line design pattern" seen on the piece offered here likely refers to Athena Promachos, and her scale armor cuirass, and the Greek Attic painter who produced this piece, simply transferred this pattern onto this example. In addition, this piece likely held olive oil which was sacred to the goddess Athena, and there was a sacred grove of olive trees which was located near the base of the Parthenon. If in fact the design on this rare vessel is intended to represent scale armor, was the design of this piece conceived to protect a sacred olive oil? This is a question that really cannot be answered, but what is certain is that this alabastron vessel, with this "scale armor line design pattern", is also not seen on other Attic alabastron examples that are classified in the Beazley Archive, Oxford; however, this pattern is seen on other Attic vessels for the period that show Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass. The piece offered here is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some minute surface pitting and scraps. Overall, this elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a very nice example with a rare painted design. This piece also comes with a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: W. Levy collection, U.K., circa 1916-2006. Ex: Bonham's Antiquities, London, April 2007, no. 324. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367369
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This vibrant Nazca globular vessel dates to the Middle Nazca Period, circa 300-600 A.D., and is approximately 10 inches high, by 9 inches in diameter through the center of the piece. This piece has very vibrant dark red, orange, cream, black, white, and light aquamarine colors. This piece was painted over a light brown/tan clay, and has perfect globular symmetry in it's creation. This attractive piece has a flat "basket handle" that covers the top opening, and this opening also has an esoteric flared lip. This piece is also larger than other examples of this type, and is a type not often seen relative to Nazca ceramics. This piece features a powerful image of a "spirit god", which has also been termed a "demon-feline god", and this god has a mirror image of itself seen on each half of the vessel. (For an explanation of this composite god see "Culturas Precolumbinas Nazca", by J. Antonio de Lavalle", Lima, 1986.) This "spirit god" has a facing head with open and noticeable white eyes, a linear open mouth with a tongue protruding, a multi-colored and segmented necklace, and trailing legs with a textile cape that has two attached trophy heads and a facing head at the end. This figure also appears to be in flight, and is an excellent representation of a god in the spirit world. A major theme of Nazca ceramic art features complex figures with feline faces and human trophy-heads probably alluding to war, the taking of heads, and the use of blood offerings to earth, sky, and water. Similarly dressed figures may also have appeared in ceremonial rites. This piece was repaired from several fragments, as is usually the case relative to large-scale Nazca ceramics, and is approximately 98% original. A nice large piece with very powerful and vibrant iconography. This powerful piece also comes with a clear Plexiglas ring base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, no. 28R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #577270
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This exquisite Greek Attic blackware mug is in flawless condition and has a deep black lustrous glaze. This pieces dates circa 5th-4th century BC and is approximately 4.4 inches high by 3.5 inches in diameter at the rim. This piece has attractive minute white calcium deposits and root marking, and the outer and inner surfaces of this piece are exceptional. The deep black lustrous glaze, in combination with the other surface factors noted above, give this piece a high degree of eye appeal. The mint condition of this piece points to the fact that it may also have been solely a votive piece, and was never used in real life. This piece has a black circle/dot pattern symbol, which is seen centered on the base at the bottom. This symbol is a mark for an Athenian ceramic shop, and the esoteric curved shape of the body displays great skill in the potters hand. Ex: Gunter Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1384803
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality and beautiful Roman glass flask dates circa 4th century A.D., and is approximately 5.4 inches high. This piece is made from a pale blue-green glass, with a spherical body, concave base, and an extended neck that widens up to the rim. There is also an attractive trailing decoration that spirals around a third of the neck, and has developed a striking iridescence. This trailing neck thread decoration was created to provide a "grip" on the neck, and perhaps doubled as a "stopper" for a wax seal around the top opening of the vessel. This piece also has sections of a multi-iridescent patina with hues of peach, lavender, blue, and green. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal. (For the type see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, no. 403. Classified as: "Galilee Fabric".) Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Superior Galleries: "The International Diamond Corporation Auction", Los Angeles, CA., June 8, 1993. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374723
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Greek core-formed glass alabastron, and dates circa mid 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is a brilliant cobalt dark blue glass that has added dark yellow trailing glass, and this dark yellow trailing glass is seen as decorative patterns that were applied on the main body of the vessel. These "zig-zag" and "linear" yellow glass patterns were added to the vessel as it was spinning on a heated rod. This piece also has a short neck, a rounded disk at the lip of the vessel, and two small lug handles seen below the shoulder of the vessel. Glass alabastra of this type were containers for perfumed oils, and their flat rounded rims allowed their precious contents to be dispensed easily in small quantities. As the name suggests, these vessels in glass are probably modeled after those made in alabaster. The exceptional piece offered here is in superb to mint quality condition, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece also has some spotty light to dark white calcite deposits, and these form a thin layer in sections of the vessel. There is also some small minute rounded spalls and cracking with mineralization within, which is normal for authentic vessels of this type. Overall, a superb to mint conditioned piece that has a patina and brilliant color that is much better than what is normally seen. (This piece is also classified as: Grose Class II:B; Harden Form 10, Alabastron Form II:4, and is analogous to the examples seen in: "The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass", by Frederick Grose, Hudson Hills Pub., 1989, nos. 132-133.) A custom Plexiglas display stand is included. Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Superior Galleries: "The International Diamond Corporation auction", Los Angeles, CA., June 1986. Ex: Superior Galleries auction, Los Angeles, CA., June 8, 1993, no. 135. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is an iron "grape picker" scythe that dates circa late 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is intact with no breaks and/or cracks, and is a solid intact example which is rare for an iron piece such as this. This complete piece has a heavy and solid dark to light brown earthen coating, of combined earthen and mineral deposits, which has sealed this iron piece from oxygen and deterioration. This piece has a square tang that was embedded into a wooden shaft, and a flat outer edge with an inner edge that was sharpened into an implement that was very efficient. The piece offered here is analogous to an iron "grape picker" that was found in an estate that was known to have produced grapes and wine. (This analogous piece of similar shape and size is published in "Ancient Country Houses on Modern Roads", Pub. Archaeological Receipts Fund, Athens, 2003, no. 318.) The piece offered here likely had many uses, but another use is known, and this piece was adapted into a deadly weapon that was used in battle. This type of piece was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse, and is known as a "grape picker" sickle weapon. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. An image of this type of piece is also seen as a mint mark symbol, and is seen on the reverse of a silver tetradrachm attributed to Alexander the Great, Babylon mint, circa 311-305 B.C. (See attached photo for the reverse of this coin. This coin type is also published in Martin Price, "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991, no. 3768. It is also thought that this coin was minted in Babylon as military pay for the armies of Alexander who were at Babylon at his death in 323 B.C.) It is also very likely that this type of weapon was used by Alexander's armies in his fight against heavy Persian armored cavalry. The piece offered here was also found in a collection of iron spearheads with the same type of patina and earthen deposits. This piece is an example of an extremely rare weapon that also had other utilitarian uses. This piece is also mounted on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1394722
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare piece is a Greek rhyton that dates to the mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 9.5 inches long, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the rim. This well-defined piece was formed from a mold, and is a light tan terracotta that has a spotty light black glaze with some dark to light brown burnishing. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. The detailed ram's head at the terminal end of this attractive piece has a very defined snout, eyes, and horns. There is also a single looped strap handle under the flared rim, and a small pin hole is seen at the end of the snout. This feature is also an indication that this piece was a votive type piece, and was made so the departed could toast the gods. This vessel also has concentric serrated ridges that run around the main body of the vessel, and this was an aid in grasping this vessel with one hand, as this was a drinking vessel. Greek drinking cups of this type were very popular and were used for banquets, weddings, and drinking parties. There were all sorts of shapes for them - bulls, goats, dogs, and the ram as seen here. Regardless of the type, not many ceramic rhyton vessels have been found on the market, and most surviving examples were most likely votive in nature. Another analogous example of this type and size is from the Arthur Sackler Foundation, and was on loan to Fordham's University Museum of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. (See attached photo.) The rare piece offered here also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: