Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356937
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This flawless piece is a Greek Apulian Xenon-ware kylix that dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This lovely little piece is approximately 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has been attributed to the "Red Swan Group" and it is classified as being "Xenon-ware", which is a sub group of "Greek Apulian" ceramics. This piece has a lustrous black glaze with dark orange painted decorative elements, and features a "high footed base ring". The decorative elements include a red swan facing left, within a "double circular tondo", along with two "three dotted" symbols and a single "ivy leaf" symbol. These symbols are commonly seen on Apulian type ceramics, and may signify the artist in one particular workshop and/or the workshop itself. There are also two laurel wreaths seen on the piece, with one on the inner surface that frames the inner "double circular tondo", and another on the outer surface that runs around the piece. The two handles attached to the piece are upturned, and have some minute stress cracks which is normal for a ceramic of this type, and have no visual repair/restoration. The surfaces have some minute cracking which is also normal, and some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel. The surface also has a preservative wax, which lends this attractive piece it's glossy appearance as well. Overall, an exceptional piece and a high quality example. (An analogous example of the same quality and size was sold by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 396. $1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see Margaret Mayo, "The Art of South Italy, Vases from Magna Graecia", Richmond, Virginia, 1982, no. 160. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1313572
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This exceptional piece is a massive Roman glass bottle that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This beautiful piece is a pale blue-green color, is free blown, and has a slightly indented "dimple base". This piece also has a long cylindrical neck that is constricted at the lower end, and has a flanged "roll-band" below the rounded rim. This "roll-band" was designed to act as an aid for a portable seal over the opening, such as an animal skin or textile seal. This large-scale piece was also likely a storage vessel for a precious oil or unguent. This piece has a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, exceptional smooth surfaces, and some minute root marking. Large-scale Roman blown glass vessels like this example took a great deal of skill to produce, and large-scale pieces with balanced symmetry like this example are rare on the market. In addition, flawless examples like this piece are also not often seen as well. A rare and exceptional large-scale piece that has an interesting design with a brilliant multi-colored patina. Ex: Private Geneva, Switzerland, collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 138. ($6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360626
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This extremely large Greek lead "sling-bullet" dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 2.25 inches long, by 1.35 inches wide, by .7 inches high. This piece is extremely large for the type, as most examples have an average size of approximately 1-1.4 inches long, by .7 inches wide. This massive scarce to rare piece was cast in a mold, is solid lead, and is a very heavy example. This weapon also has an almond shape, as most lead "sling-bullets" have, and this shape provided a stable aerodynamic flight, an easy extraction from a mold, and enabled this piece to more easily stay in the sling cradle without rolling out. This piece also has a lengthy inscription on one side, with seven to nine letters, and the other side has an image of a thunderbolt. The inscription may name a city, an individual, or it may convey an insult such as "take this". The inscription has not been translated, as some of the letters are not clear, and the inscription may also have abbreviations built into the one line of letters. This piece has a light gray patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a complete example. This piece also has some dents and minor gouges, and some of these imperfections were likely a result from impacts from battle, as there is a thick patina seen over some of these imperfections. This piece is scarce to rare in this large size, and is a piece that best represents this type of ancient weapon. This interesting piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1269323
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These beautiful Greek gold pieces were once part of a necklace, and date circa late 4th century B.C. There are eleven (11) pieces, and they were all made to suspend from a cord and/or were attached to the main body of a necklace. Each piece is approximately .75 inches long, by .25 inches in diameter. These gold pieces have a suspension loop at one end, and they were all mold made and put together with two halves. These pieces are also relatively light, as they are hollow and are made from sheet gold that was hammered into shape with a mold. These pieces are in the form of pinecone, or possibly fennel seeds, and this shape was extremely popular in ancient Greek jewelry during the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This type of necklace, that usually had rosettes and stylized seed, made their appearance after the middle of the 4th century B.C., and was known throughout the former empire of Alexander the Great. It's quite possible that the gold found in these necklace pieces originated from the Persian Empire. These pieces were also designed to "free float" in the necklace, and had a great deal of movement as one moved with the piece. These pieces were designed to catch the eye of the viewer, and are a clever design with a great deal of eye appeal. These necklace pieces have a brilliant gold color, and some minute mineral deposits can be seen under high magnification. These attractive pieces were well made, are not coming apart, and are in superb to mint condition. These pieces could in fact be worn today, and could easily be fitted into an attractive necklace. For the type and several examples see, "Greek Gold: Jewelry of the Classical World, by Dyfri Williams and Jack Ogden, Abrams Pub., New York, 1994. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1130376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a young God and/or King. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 4.9 inches high by 4.7 inches wide. This intact piece is complete, and has spotty dark black and brown earthern deposits both on the front and back side surfaces. This beautiful piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and has sharp detail. This piece is in the form of a young God and/or King who is seen with an upward gaze, and is wearing a diadem band on the forehead. The diadem band is also a Greek Hellenistic symbol of royalty, along with being an emblem of sovereignty, and this mask may also portray a king and/or a character in an ancient Greek play. This terracotta mask is a votive type piece, and is likely a tragic type theater mask. Votive masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines by individuals who were linked to the theater, and were often dedicated after a trilogy of plays were performed that recounted one of the serious mythological dramas. The single hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering, and is a scarce type. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398614
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze military horse saddle cinch handle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 3.3 inches long, by 2.7 inches wide at the terminal end, by 1.7 inches high at the ring attachment. This piece is a scarce to rare example with no repair and/or restoration, and was mounted on a leather strap that was fitted to a Roman saddle. There are two holes seen at one end that held rivets for the leather strap, and the terminal end has two flaring dotted ends that allowed one to firmly grip this handle. There is also a raised ring that locked this handle in place with another strap. This entire piece was also made to firmly wrap around the attached leather strap which tucked deeply into the handle. The overall design of this piece is very practical, and is a scarce Roman military cavalry piece not often seen on the market. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits. For the type of a Roman military cavalry saddle see: "The Roman Cavalry" by Karen Dixon and Pat Southern, Barnes and Noble Books Pub., 2000. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
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This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this complete piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here, as the hardened earthen glaze has preserved these pieces. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 12.5 and 8 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". The shaft was also likley tapered, and was thinner at the back end of the shaft which would save weight for the weapon. In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360699
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 grams, and is approximately 22 mm in diameter. This coin also has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer the the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of this rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1398323
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This intact and vibrant piece is a late Byzantine glass weight/game piece that dates circa 7th-9th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately .8 inches in diameter, and has a vibrant dark blue color with applied white trailing highlights. This piece may have been used as weight in a scale that weighed Byzantine coins, and/or it may also have served as a game piece. This piece was made with a hot trailing glass that was spun around the dark blue solid core, and was made as earlier Greek core-formed glass. This piece also has a slightly flat bottom, and easily stands upright. This piece does not have a hole through the center, as beads also produced during this period have, and this piece is a beautiful solid example that can easily be fitted into a modern piece of jewelry. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1389309
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This scarce piece is an Etruscan Black Ware bucchero vessel stand that dates to the mid 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches in diameter at the top rim, and is 2.8 inches high. This interesting ceramic also has a deep lustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, and is known as a "bucchero" type ceramic. This piece has an indented round depression seen at the top, and this likely held a glass vessel, or a vessel such as an aryballos with a rounded bottom. This piece also has a raised stem on a round flat base, and the entire piece is very durable, as it is thick-walled. This vessel also has an old inventory tag attached to the bottom showing the "No. 38", and "Orvieto", which was one of the major Etruscan cities from antiquity. This piece is intact, and has exceptional surfaces with some minute root marking and spotty white mineral deposits. A scarce type vessel not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1274546
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Scythian gold rosette plaque that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches in diameter, by .2 inches high at the raised center, and is a large example for the type. This gold rosette has a dotted border, with eight round floral pedal designs that run around the central element of the piece. This central element is a green glass inlay that is supported by a raised gold band. There is also an additional dotted decorative band the runs around the central glass inlay. This piece was also hand punched into a mold, thus forming the raised designs that are seen on the front side of this striking piece. There is also a minute centering central dot seen on the back side, which is a Greek convention of art during the 4th century B.C. This complete and intact piece also has some black mineral deposits where this piece likely attached to a garment that may have been votive. There are also minute black and dark brown spotty mineral deposits, along with minute root marks that are seen in various sections of the piece. This piece is also not thin gold sheeting, and is solid with some tensile strength, and this is an indication that this is not solely a votive type piece, and may have been worn on special occasions as well. This piece is a floral design with the raised central green glass element, and the green glass likely represents the center of a flower. This piece is also likely from the Black Sea region, and is analogous to gold plaques that have been found there that have floral designs. (See attached photo of an analogous Greco-Scythian floral rosette that was found near ancient Kerch, south of the Sea of Azov. This piece is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. This piece was published in "The Splendor of Scythian Art" by M.I. Artamonov, New York, 1969, no. 149.) These floral designs can be explained by the Greek Eleusinian cult that flourished in the Black Sea region, and the worship of Demeter and Persephone which represented the "change of the seasons" and "birth and rebirth", and these concepts were also associated with the growth of flowers and agriculture. The scarce to rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market and has great eye appeal, as this piece has a brilliant color. This piece can also be worn today, as it is a durable solid example, and it can easily be built into a pendant or necklace. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: