Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #862556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This scarce piece is a bronze ring that is from the Luristan culture that dwelled in Western Iran, circa 1000-800 B.C., Iron Age II. This object was cast as one solid piece, is approximately 4.9 inches in diameter, and is very heavy, as it is approximately .5 inches thick. This beautiful piece is in superb condition and has an exceptional dark green patina with light brown and reddish highlights. This massive adornment was worn above the bicep on the upper arm, and was considered to be a very valuable object by this culture. This piece was likely clamped on the upper arm of a warrior individual who wore this piece for life, and this piece has a high degree of smooth wear on the inner surfaces, which is a good indication that the owner wore this piece for a considerable length of time. The Luristan culture was a tribal society of mixed small-scale agriculturalists and pastoralists, raising sheep and goats, many horses, and perhaps using chariots where the terrain permitted. The wealth of this culture was concentrated in the hands of a warrior aristocracy who patronized the metal smiths, and they considered bronze very valuable, as it could be fashioned over and over again into weapons. This culture was highly skilled in the arts of war, and perhaps only the Spartans could have been as skilled in the use of their weapons. This piece has attractive decorative chevrons and checker-band patterns that were engraved into the metal. These designs are also seen on the ceramics for the period. (For other bronze armlets of this type see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals" by P.R.S. Moorey, Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, nos. 611-613.) A custom stand is included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328068
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive Greek bronze is a complete relief plaque that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, by 1.3 inches thick which is also an extremely high relief. This piece shows a striding panther that is walking left, and is seen looking back at it's handler which is a nude walking Eros. The nude walking Eros is also seen pulling a rope that is secured around the neck of the panther, and the walking Eros also has wings that are seen behind his back. The panther is seen with his head facing the viewer, and the body of the Eros is twisted with an open chest towards the viewer as well. The entire scene is framed by a Greek acanthus pattern at the top, and scrolls to the left and right. This plaque likely was an applique that was attached to a bronze hydria or a bronze vessel of some type, and is a scarce example. The panther was sacred to Dionysus, and the Eros may be a representative of Dionysus as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece also hangs from a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Published: Royal-Athena Galleries: "Gods and Mortals", 1989, no. 13. ($3,750.00 fixed price.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372975
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This dainty and mint conditioned Greek Attic kylix dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches high, by 6.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous black blaze and is seen on the outer and inner surfaces of the piece, save for the bottom of the vessel that has an unglazed section. This unglazed reserved section also has a "circle-and-dot" design element seen on the bottom center of the vessel. The shoulder of the piece is slightly offset, and is a well made example. This piece is also in flawless condition, with no repair/restoration, and has a great deal of muti-colored iridescence patina. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. A flawless Greek Attic vessel with nice eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
These ten little miniature Corinthian ceramics date circa 600-550 B.C., and are miniature ceramics that are votive in nature. They are approximately .75 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide for the near identical five (5) skyphoi; 1.5 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger skyphos; 1.2 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide for the two kantharos; 1.25 inches high, by 1.8 inches wide for the smaller hydria; and 2.9 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger hydria. One of the kantharos and the larger hydria have a black glaze, and the balance of the pieces have a light tan buff surface, with some added dark brown and light red line design. These miniature pieces are scarce on the market, as they are votive, and reflect a trend in Corinthian pottery production of miniature vessels that seem to have been created exclusively as votives. Their small size precludes any practical use or function, and various examples of skyphoi and other vessel shapes have been found in a variety of sanctuaries and sacred places. These type of pieces have also played a role in the ritual activity at these sites. These pieces are all intact, save for a missing handle on one of the kantharos, and some minute chips seen on the larger hydria. Overall, these ten pieces are a superb group that also has some light mineral deposits and root marking, and best represent a sacred ritual as there are three different ceramic types seen within the group. (Another group of seven pieces was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1987, no. 227. 800-100 pounds estimates.) These pieces also come with a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374723
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This scarce piece is a Greek core-formed glass alabastron, and dates circa mid 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is a brilliant cobalt dark blue glass that has added dark yellow trailing glass, and this dark yellow trailing glass is seen as decorative patterns that were applied on the main body of the vessel. These "zig-zag" and "linear" yellow glass patterns were added to the vessel as it was spinning on a heated rod. This piece also has a short neck, a rounded disk at the lip of the vessel, and two small lug handles seen below the shoulder of the vessel. Glass alabastra of this type were containers for perfumed oils, and their flat rounded rims allowed their precious contents to be dispensed easily in small quantities. As the name suggests, these vessels in glass are probably modeled after those made in alabaster. The exceptional piece offered here is in superb to mint quality condition, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece also has some spotty light to dark white calcite deposits, and these form a thin layer in sections of the vessel. There is also some small minute rounded spalls and cracking with mineralization within, which is normal for authentic vessels of this type. Overall, a superb to mint conditioned piece that has a patina and brilliant color that is much better than what is normally seen. (This piece is also classified as: Grose Class II:B; Harden Form 10, Alabastron Form II:4, and is analogous to the examples seen in: "The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass", by Frederick Grose, Hudson Hills Pub., 1989, nos. 132-133.) A custom Plexiglas display stand is included. Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
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This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
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This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this complete piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here, as the hardened earthen glaze has preserved these pieces. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 12.5 and 8 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". The shaft was also likley tapered, and was thinner at the back end of the shaft which would save weight for the weapon. In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310457
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic "Red-Figure" kylix that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high, and is 10 inches wide from handle to handle. This superb Attic ceramic is classified as a "Red-Figured, Type C" kylix, and is attributed to the "Painter of London D12", who is a rare Attic painter that is seldom seen on the market. This piece is intact, save for an ancient break in the stem section of the stemmed footed base, and was repaired in antiquity with a bronze and lead pin. It's quite possible that this piece was broken in antiquity while playing the drinking game "kottabos", which was played at a drinking party known as a "symposium". This game was played by spinning the kylix on the index finger in order to fling the wine dregs swirling in the bottom of the cup onto a target in the room. Obviously, many kylix drinking cups were broken while playing this game. The ancient bronze and lead pin is approximately 2 inches long, and reattached the stemmed base to the main body of the piece. One end of the pin can also be seen on the inner surface in the middle of the tondo, and the other end can be seen centered within the stemmed base on the bottom side. The original owner must have thought enough of this attractive piece to have had it repaired for use again. This piece has a seated young man facing right within the round tondo, and is seen wearing a himation (cloak). The facial details of this young man are very detailed, and his pleasing young face is easily seen. The cloak also has curved definition lines, and a single thick black line that defines the garment edge, and both of these artistic features are artistic features of the early 5th century. It's quite possible that this piece may be attributed to an earlier painter such as "Makron", due to the artistic features noted above, rather than a slightly later painter such as the "Painter of London D12". The exterior surface has an even lustrous black glaze, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional piece that is also a scarce example with an ancient repair. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1994, no. 109. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402708
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 gms, and is approximately 22mm in diameter. This coin has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin features on the obverse (Obv.), a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse (Rev.) features: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The standing eagle is also a symbol of Zeus, and was a messenger of the gods. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer to the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of the rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG COP 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1044364
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This visually appealing piece is a large Mayan cylinder vessel that dates circa 400-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 6.9 inches in diameter, is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and sits on four legs that are attached to the bottom base. This piece is a bright orange and black-line polychrome ceramic, which has a "square-cubed" geometric pattern that runs around the entire outer surface. This pattern is likely an imitation of a basket weave pattern, or possibly a textile pattern. Mayan artists also relished imitation of one material with another, particularly in painted media that we read as "trompe l' oeil", in which the eye is tricked, and in the case of the piece offered here, the surface was painted in such a way as to make the observer see woven basketry. In addition, and according to Herbert J. Spinden in "A Study of Mayan Art, Its Subject Matter & Historical Development", Dover Pub., New York, 1975, page 147: "Simple basket weavings appear as painted ornamentation on potsherds from the Uloa Valley (Fig. 204). Complicated braided patterns are common as the rim decoration on pottery from this region, and may have had their origin in the imitation of wicker-work basketry. It is probable that basketry was not of much importance as an art among the Maya, owing to the high development of ceramics." This piece has some heavy spotty black manganese deposits and root marking, which is mainly seen on the bottom and at the bottom edge of the vessel. This piece has some minor minute glaze loss, but overall, it is in extremely fine condition. This piece is also from the Salvador/Honduran region, as the orange and black colors are common for the region, but the type of geometric "square-cubed" pattern that is seen running around the entire vessel is not common, and is a scarce design. This large piece is interesting, has a high degree of eye appeal, and is scarce in this condition with its vibrant color. Ex: C.W. Slagle collection, Scottsdale, AZ., circa 1980's. Ex: Private FL. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383260
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This intact piece is an attractive Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C., and is approximately 4.35 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a graceful bowl with a flared rim and an added ring base, and has looping strap handles that were solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece also has a reddish-tan reserve at the bottom, along with a black centered dot. The interior of the vessel also has a thick, lustrous black glaze that is also an indication that this vessel was specifically made for holding liquids such as wine. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests an Attic manufacture, and/or is the product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (See "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913.) The piece offered here is superb to mint quality with no repair and/or restoration, and is in "as found" condition, as it has numerous root marks and spotty light brown and white calcite deposits. In addition, this piece has an attractive multi-colored iridescent patina, and is a better example than what is normally seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1239297
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Chavin "stirrup handle" ceramic that dates to the Early Horizon period, circa 700-400 B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7 inches long. This interesting piece is a standing animal, which represents a coatimundi, or possibly a fox, as the lively head of this standing animal has an elongated nose and peaked ears. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is an orange and light red color. This esoteric piece is in overall superb condition, has some spotty black dotted mineral deposits, and some normal stirrup handle surface roughness. This piece has four large circle designs, and some geometric line design seen on each side, at the front, and on the face of this animated creature. The rectangular shaped head has dotted eyes, and is seen slightly tilted to the right, which give this piece a high degree of eye appeal and a very animated look. The mouth also appears to be slightly turned as well, and this movement noted with the head and mouth may represent this piece as a "transformation type" vessel. This type of artistic style, as noted above, is also attributed to the Chavin type ceramics known as "Tembladera style". This remarkable piece was produced at a very early period, regarding Pre-Columbian Andean cultures, and has a rare design with the esoteric curved hind quarter of the piece. This type of esoteric design is also rare regarding Chavin type ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. A piece with analogous artistic style was offered in Bonham's Pre-Columbian Art, San Francisco, CA., Dec. 2006, no. 5352. (This stirrup vessel type piece has analogous line design, color, and nose design, and depicts a humanoid figure.) Another analogous stirrup type ceramic vessel was offered in Christie's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 41. (This vessel depicts a jaguar with a slightly tilted head, peaked ears, and dotted eyes. The head is also a triangular designed head with an elongated snout, and this head is also turned to the right. This piece is classified as "Tembladera", circa 700-400 B.C. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $4,800.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an esoteric design that is seldom seen on the market, and it is extremely rare in it's intact condition. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364645
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This nice piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the mid 5th century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.5 inches in diameter. This piece is in superb condition and is intact, save for a minor crack repair at the base of the vessel which is normal for a large vessel of this type. This attractive vessel has a trefoil spout, and a graceful upper shoulder that extends up from the rounded flat base. There is a heavy looped handle attached to this vessel, and was cast as one piece. This interesting handle was also designed so that the vessel could be suspended from a cord from the raised loop. The lower end of this heavy vertical handle terminates with a thick "ivy-leaf" that is attached to the side of the vessel. There are also two small openings, on each side of the handle near the upper rim, where the cord was attached, and these small openings could also have supported a hinged lid. This piece was also hand beaten from one solid sheet of bronze over a series of molds. This piece also has a beautiful dark to light green patina, with dark blue highlights, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece also easily stands upright, as it has a flat bottom, and the heavy handle was also designed into the upper center of the vessel. (A bronze hydria, dated to circa 450 B.C., with thick "ivy-leaf" terminating handles is seen in the Goulandris Collection in "Ancient Greek Art", Athens, 1996, no. 258. See attached photo.) This scarce vessel is an exceptional example for the type, and is also much rarer than ceramics of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389637
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a black glazed Colima seated shaman that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 10.8 inches high. This pleasing piece has a deep black lustrous glaze over the entire piece, and is scarce as such, as most Colima examples of this type have a red to reddish brown glaze. This seated shaman is seen gesturing with a left upraised arm, and this arm also forms an open spout. This lively shaman is also seen with his right hand placed on his thigh, "coffee-bean" type eyes, an extended nose, and a serene expression. He is also seen wearing a linear patterned lion cloth that is designed with detailed white incised lines, and these incised designs are seen on both sides of the body. In addition, he is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, and a tall "turban-helmet" with a raised horn that also has side straps that are seen falling to the shoulders. This piece was also likely created as a "protector" type piece, and was an individual that had magical powers. This piece is intact, save for a re-attached left leg, and is 100% original. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example, as it has great detail with the incised decorative elements, and the black glaze that is seldom seen. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1989, no. 100. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1386486
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek terracotta dates to the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3.8 inches high. This large bust is intact, and is a complete bust of a very large standing terracotta of a goddess such as Persephone, who is the Greek goddess of harvest and fertility. This esoteric bust has exceptional artistic style, as the head is slightly tilted to the left, and the head is slightly uplifted. The hair is also tied upwards into a bun above the forehead, and the face has a slight smile. This very large bust is in it's natural "as found" condition with it's natural earthen deposits, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 5 inches. For the type see "Tanagra Mythe et Archeologie", Louve, Paris, 2004, fig. 107. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: