Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1313572
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This exceptional piece is a massive Roman glass bottle that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This beautiful piece is a pale blue-green color, is free blown, and has a slightly indented "dimple base". This piece also has a long cylindrical neck that is constricted at the lower end, and has a flanged "roll-band" below the rounded rim. This "roll-band" was designed to act as an aid for a portable seal over the opening, such as an animal skin or textile seal. This large-scale piece was also likely a storage vessel for a precious oil or unguent. This piece has a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, exceptional smooth surfaces, and some minute root marking. Large-scale Roman blown glass vessels like this example took a great deal of skill to produce, and large-scale pieces with balanced symmetry like this example are rare on the market. In addition, flawless examples like this piece are also not often seen as well. A rare and exceptional large-scale piece that has an interesting design with a brilliant multi-colored patina. Ex: Private Geneva, Switzerland, collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 138. ($6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #1242679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This scarce piece is a Chimu/Inka culture silver mask that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This piece is approximately 8 inches wide by 6.9 inches high by 1 inch deep. This appealing designed piece is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the lower nose section, and is complete with no restoration/repair. This piece has a nice dark gray patina with some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and thick dark/light brown mineral deposits are seen on the back side of this piece. This piece was also hand beaten from a single silver sheet, and there are punched cheek, nose, and mouth details. There are also two punched horizontal shaped eye holes, and two holes on each side which were used to tie this powerfully primitive designed piece to a textile shrouded mummy bundle. This piece also has very little bend, and also served as a solid cover for the mummy bundle. The primitive design of this piece may also have been designed to represent the departed in the spirit world, and also served to protect the mummy. This piece is also the normal size for a piece of this type, and another scarce piece of this type classified as Chimu culture is seen in "Peru, Durch Die Jahrtausende", Verlag Aurel Bongers KG, Recklinghausen 1984, Austria, Kat.-Nr. 11.67, Linden-Museum, Stuttgart, Museum no. M 31 059. (The Stuttgart example is approximately 8 inches high and has analogous punched out eye holes, and punched nose and facial details. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a powerfully primitive designed facial image that defines the essence of Pre-Columbian Andean art. This striking piece also comes with a custom shadow box, and can easily be removed, as it is mounted within with removable plastic tabs. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 149, Lot 371, Zurich, circa 1990. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1357220
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This detailed and interesting piece is a late Roman/Byzantine bronze bracelet that dates circa 4th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches in diameter, by 1.2 inches high. The opening on the back side is approximately .9 inches wide, and the terminal ends have rounded edges. This beautiful piece is also intact, and has no repair and/or restoration. This piece has six engraved box designs, and within each box is a "stylized floral" pattern that is also a conventional art design for the period. The "stylized floral" patterns are often seen in other art pieces for the period, and were sometimes used to portray the "holy cross" with "four pointed rays". There is one box in the center of the piece that has "four pointed rays", while the others have six to eight. This symbol was used in the same context as the holy "fish" symbol, which was used to signal and mark one's faith. This piece also has a beautiful light to dark green patina, and has some spotty light blue and red highlights. The engraving is very fine and detailed, and is a superb example for the period. This piece does not flex, although the metal is relatively thin, and really should not be worn today. This piece sits on a custom metal stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1320798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This superb Mayan "orange glazed" bowl with a glyph band dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 5.25 inches high by 7.75 inches in diameter. This piece is intact, and has some heavy root marking, along with some white calcite and spotty minute dark black mineral deposits. This attractive piece has a flat bottom, and has a graceful rounded body which gradually narrows towards the rim. This piece has a bright "orange glaze" with a red and black band seen just below the rim. Below this decorative red and black banded design, a black painted glyph band is seen running around the vessel that consists of fourteen identical glyphs. The detailed glyph band was also painted from right to left, and the beginning and end of the glyph band is seen, as the last glyph painted does not have the added "speech scrolls". The "speech scrolls" were not added to the last painted glyph, because the artist ran out of room within the overall composition, and could not over paint into the first painted glyph. This repeating glyph is also analogous to the glyph seen in "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Books Inc., New York, 2002, p. 146, Fig. 8-11. (See attached photo.) The glyph seen on the vessel offered here, along with the published glyph noted above, both have "speech scrolls" attached at the left side of the rounded main body of the glyph, and these "speech scrolls" represent a "quotative particle" in Mayan iconography, meaning as the term "quotative" indicates, certain particles (glyphs) attribute phrases to individuals as though these were the figure's utterances or actual speech. In the case of the glyph seen here, it is interpreted as "it is his saying", which may also be interpreted as "this vessel belongs to him". It is interesting to note that this glyph repeats again, and again, around the vessel within the glyph band, and in this case, the presence of this glyph tells us that this object belongs to someone. This type of possessive reference is a well-known reference seen in dedicatory Mayan ceramic texts. The piece offered here is as attractive, as it is interesting, and this type of Mayan ceramic is scarce on the market today. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1397562
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze "Tabula Ansata" military plaque that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.4 inches long, by 1.2 inches high, by 1/8 inches thick, and has an exceptional dark green patina with spotty dark brown/red highlights. This piece is rectangular shaped, and was made from a sheet of bronze cut in a "Tabula Ansata" format, which was a tablet with dovetail handles at each end. This type of format was also a favored shape in Imperial Rome for creating votive markers, and "Tabula Ansata" simply means "tablet with handles". Roman bronze military tablets/plaques of this form have also been found with the remnants of leather covers of soldier's shields at Vindonissa, a Roman legion camp at the modern town of Windisch, Switzerland. The example offered here has a hole at each end, and within are remnants of iron rivets, in addition to, an iron rectangular plate seen on the backside of each rivet that fastened the plaque to leather, or some sort of other material. There is also some remnants of this material seen between the plaque and the iron rectangular plates as well. This attractive piece also has five lines of engraved text that reads: VIHANSAE-Q.CATIVS.LIBO.NEPOS.-CENTVRIO.LEG.III-CYRENAICAE.SCV-TVM.ET.LANCEAM.D.D. This piece likely refers to a Roman centurion whose name and title is seen on the first two lines of the plaque, and was a member of the famed Legion III, Cyrenaica, which was first formed by Mark Antony in Alexandria, Egypt circa 35 B.C., and was under his direct command along with his ally, Cleopatra VII. Elements of this legion were also known to have fought in the "First Jewish-Roman War", circa 66-70 A.D., and was one of the principle legions that besieged the city of Jerusalem. Vespasian, Proconsul of Africa, led this campaign, and subsequently, this legion also accompanied Vespasian back to Alexandra, circa 69 A.D., in the "Year of the Four Emperors", and proclaimed Vespasian emperor while also controlling the grain supply to Rome. Vespasian was quickly sworn in as emperor while still in Egypt in December circa 69 A.D. This legion also was known to have participated in yet another Jewish war, the Bar Kokhba revolt, circa 132-136 A.D. Elements of this legion were also known to have been along the Danube River, circa 84-88 A.D., the Parthian frontier under Trajan, circa 120 A.D., and again the Parthian frontier under Lucius Verus, circa 162-166 A.D. It's also likely this legion was involved in the fighting with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra circa 262-267 A.D., and over time, this legion was perhaps one of the most traveled Roman legions in Roman history. This piece is a remarkable Roman military object seldom seen on the market, and sits on a custom display stand. For the type see: Elizabeth Meyer, "Legitimacy and Law in the Roman World: Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice", Cambrige University Press, 2004. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383243
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic kylix that dates circa 450 B.C., and is approximately 7.65 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and has a deep black glaze on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a dark orange reserve with a black dot and concentric circles on the bottom, and four incised letters (N-T-I-N) that likely represent the name of the "owner" of the vessel. In addition, there are two heavily incised letters (A-A) seen below one of the looped handles, and these may represent "control" marks from the kiln and/or exporter. There are also mold pressed designs seen on the inner surface of the bowl. This intact piece has some spotty glaze loss, and has some additional features, as noted above, that are not normally seen on a vessel of this type, and as such, is a scarce to rare example. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1355169
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This beautiful piece is a light blue Roman glass ribbed bowl that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches in diameter, by 2.2 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no hairline cracks, chips, or any other imperfections. This piece also has 26 vertical ribs that increase in thickness, and run upwards from the flat bottom to just below the upper rim. This type of bowl is also known as a "pillar-molded" bowl, as it was mold made, and was then ground and polished into shape. There are also two decorative well-defined "wheel-cut concentric grooves", and a small well-defined "wheel-cut circle" seen on the inner bottom center of the bowl. In addition, there are two shallow "wheel-cut grooves" that are seen running around the middle of the inner wall. These shallow "wheel-cut grooves" are also so shallow in sections that they do not appear to have been intended as a decorative type element, but rather are marks that resulted from centering a polishing tool within the inner surface of the bowl. There are also some faint polishing lines still visible on the inner surface, as this piece is in mint condition, and may have been offered solely as a votive type object. This piece also has a spotty multi-colored iridescence, and some light earthen deposits seen mostly on the outer surface of the vessel. The exceptional piece offered here is also one of the better recorded examples, and is nearly identical and larger than the example sold in Christies Antiquities, New York, June 2012, lot 151 ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $9,375.00 realized. 5.4 inches in diameter, with 22 vertical ribs. See attached photo.) Another example that was recently sold was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, July 2016, lot 204 ($15,000.00-$22,000.00 estimates, $16,138.00 realized. 5.75 inches in diameter, with 26 vertical ribs.) The piece offered here is not only one of the best recorded examples, but it is also a beautiful example with a light blue color that has a high degree of eye appeal, and as such, it compares in color and quality to the two other examples noted above. For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, nos. 50-52. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has well-defined mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this complete piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This solid piece can also be easily mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece as it was done in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1373329
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This stylized piece is a Scythian bronze bridle plaque in the form of a recumbent stag that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.3 inches long, by .22 inches thick in the main body of the piece. This interesting piece is a stylized seated recumbent stag that is seen looking back, with his horns arcing up at the front. There is also an extended ear seen below the horns, an elongated neck, a snout touching the hind quarters, and a hole representing a facing eye. This hole likely held a precious stone, and sections of this piece has some worn gold gilt. The back of this piece also has a round attachment ring that allowed this decorative plaque to slide onto, and attach to, a leather strap that likely made up a horse bridle. There was another duplicate ring on the backside that is missing, and this piece is complete and intact save for this missing attachment ring. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina, and overall, this piece is a better example than what is usually seen on the market. (Another example can be seen in "From the Lands of the Scythians" Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975, no. 50. See attached photo.) This piece can also be easily worn today, and comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1286571
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce to rare piece is a Mayan terracotta model of a throne, which dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 6.4 inches long, by 3.2 inches wide. This piece is made from four molded pieces, and the details and images seen on this piece were mold pressed into the terracotta. The front side of this piece shows a facing god figure, who also appears to be supporting the weight of the upper panel. The upper panel also shows two square "mat designs" which each show twelve boxes with a "spiral" symbol within. This "spiral" symbol is likely depicted as meaning "CH'ICH", meaning "blood", and/or "blood offering". This symbol also makes perfect sense for this piece, as this piece may also portray an offering altar, as well as portraying a throne that may have supported a seated figurine. The two holes seen at the top may be for pins to help support a seated figurine, but they may also represent holes that were used to drain the blood from the two panels, and this blood would then drip down below the altar and to the underworld gods below. According to the Mayan belief of blood offerings, each drop of blood would nourish the gods and the earth, ensuring a new abundant maize harvest that would feed the people and provide wealth for the court. If this was the case regarding this piece, then this piece likely is a votive representation of an offering altar where bloody offerings were placed for the gods, and this type of altar may also have doubled as a sacred throne for a Mayan royal personage. The emerging facing god seen at the front of this piece, may be a frontal version of the "War Serpent God", otherwise known as the "Jaguar-Serpent-Bird God". This composite image is primarily associated with warfare, and was a popular image with the Maya at Piedras Negras and Chichen Itza. The image seen on this piece also has feathers above each extened arm, jaguar-paw hands, a double necklace, large round ear-flares, and a nose guard attachment. (For the type of god seen here, see "The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya" by Mary Miller and Karl Taube, Thames and Hudson1993, pp. 104-105.) This complete piece is 100% original, and was repaired from four large fragments. There are also minute black spotty mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece. This type of votive piece is seldom seen on the market, and also displays a Mayan god that is seldom seen. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1304062
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This wonderful coin is a Roman silver serrate denarius, circa 79 B.C., Rome mint, and minted by C. Naevius Balbus, who was the mint master in Rome for the period. This coin is in FDC grade (mint state), is 3.78g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin has a serrated edge, and is known as a "Serrate Denarius", and the added edge work was done to insure that the mint was coining near pure silver. One could inspect this coin and see into the inner flan from the serrated edge, and know that the core of this coin was made from silver and was not plated. This type of coin briefly was the norm during the late Roman Republic period. This attractive coin features: Obv; The diademed bust of Venus facing right, with S.C behind, and Rev; A winged Victory driving a three-horse triga right, control number above, and the lettering C.NAE.BALB in the exergue below. This coin also has a beautiful light gray old cabinet patina, and fine detail can be seen with the horse reigns, minute dotted Victory wings, and the hair of Venus. C. Naevius Balbus, Rome's mint master for 79 B.C., was a supporter of Sulla and his use of Venus on the obverse of this coin, was due to the fact that Venus was the patron deity of Sulla; and the reverse type with the winged victory seen on this coin, also commemorates Sulla's victories against Mithridates VI of Pontus. The use of the three-horse triga on Roman Republican coinage is also rare - previously it occurred in 110 B.C. on the coinage of Appius Cladius, who was also consul in 79 B.C. when this coin was minted. The coin offered here is also one of the finest known examples for the type. Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 531. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1401878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze bull's head oil lamp cover that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches long, by 1.1 inches wide from ear to ear, by .3 inches high. This piece is complete with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast into a mold and was then finished with hammered details. The head of the bull seen here has very detailed eyes, snout, and horns, and is a superb example for the type. This piece also has a very attractive dark brown patina with light green and blue highlights which are also heavier on the inside surface of the piece. This piece likely served as a cover for a bronze oil lamp, and was simply placed over the central filler hole. Roman oil lamp lids of this type are also scarce, as Roman bronze oil lamps usually had lids that were attached to the lamp with a swinging type hinge. There is also no indication that this piece was attached to a hinge as well. Overall, a nice Roman bronze with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378327
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This intact piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, is an intact example, and is a large example for the type. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, and has an attractive light green glaze. There is also an attached suspension hoop seen on the lower backside of the piece, and this piece was likely worn by an individual as a "protector" type amulet. The appealing bust of Ptah offered here also appears to be bald and/or is seen wearing a skull cap, and has deeply molded facial features that convey a slight smile with a serene expression. Ptah was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the ancient Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsmen. The piece seen here was not only likely worn as an amulet, but it was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This piece is in superb condition, has a nice even glaze, and is slightly bigger than most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398950
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric green hard stone piece is a Valdivia-Chorrera hacha that dates circa 1500-600 B.C., and is approximately 5.85 inches long, by 4 inches wide, by 1.7 inches thick. This piece was produced by the Valdivia-Chorrera culture that lived in modern day Ecuador, and was one of the earliest pre-Columbian cultures of South America. This piece is a votive type object and is shaped as a battle ax, and is a type that is also referred to as a "hacha". This piece was smoothed and polished into the refined form that we see today, and this process was very labor intensive. The surfaces of this piece are very refined, and one can easily see the veins and multi-colored inclusions which enhances it's sacred "raison d'etre". This piece is also a hard serpentine type stone, and it's dark green color was highly prized among many pre-Columbian cultures. A near identical example was offered at Christie's, Paris, Art Pre-Columbian: Collection Felix Et Heidi Stoll ET A Divers Amateurs, April, 2019, no. 8. (1,000.00-1,500.00 Euro estimates. 1,000.00 Euro realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: