Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
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This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315566
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This powerful looking piece is a Greek applique of Zeus, and dates to the Classical Period, circa late 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide, by 1.1 inches in relief. This piece is also complete, and has no repair/restoration. This piece has an even dark gray patina, along with some spotty light brown iron oxide and dark green cuprite deposits. This piece was an applique likely for a large vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a volute krater, and likely fit on the main body of the vessel below a handle attachment. This piece was cast in a mold, and has great facial detail with individual beard and hair curls. There is also a laurel-leaf diadem seen in the hair, and this is an attribute of the Greek god Zeus. This piece is a scarce example, and is made from a lead-alloy metal which is occasionally seen in vessel additions of this type. This piece was made with a great deal of skill, as this piece has a great deal of detail. The fine facial detail as seen on this piece is also accented by the extremely high relief of the piece. This high degree of detail is also not normally seen on the more common analogous bronze examples of this type of piece. This piece is an exceptional "Classical Period" applique, and was part of a larger work that was of exceptional artistic style and workmanship. This piece is also set on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed by sliding it up from the two support pins. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388636
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This detailed and esoteric piece is a Greek terracotta of a Kore, and dates to the 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand. On the stand it is approximately 5 inches high. This piece was mold made, as it has a flat backside, and is a light orange terracotta. This piece depicts a Greek Kore, whose name means "maiden", and this goddess was responsible for good fortune and the change of the seasons with the "rebirth" of spring, and she was also known as "Persephone". Kore was also a fertility goddess, and is seen here holding her breasts. The face also has a slight smile, almond eyes, and a square chin which are also artistic style hallmarks for the period. This piece also has incised detailing that defines the hands, eyes, and hair locks. The face has a very esoteric look, and this piece has superb artistic style for the period. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #678982
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a bronze geometric horse that was cast in one solid piece. This attractive piece was made during the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high by 2.8 inches long. This piece is extremely early for the culture, and this can be seen relative to the artistic style with the elongated neck. This piece was probably part of a sacred necklace that may have been votive, and may have been shamanistic in nature. The stylized horse seen here may have been created as a "spirit" type animal, and this may explain the design. The design of the piece is also an early Geometric Period convention of art, and during this period, animals were designed with legs, tails, and necks that were elongated and thin. This piece also has a hoop seen on the top part of the body that connected this piece to the main body of the necklace by a chain. The hoop seen on the top part of the body may also have been broken in antiquity in order to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece, and consequently, this piece may also have been votive. There were probably several animals and/or amulets connected to this type of necklace in antiquity, and the geometric horse pendant offered here is analogous to a piece that is now seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome (Inventory no. 53438, listed as being found at Palestrina, dated circa 8th-6th century B.C.). The bronze animals seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia example are also approximately one third of the size of the piece offered here. The Museo di Villa Giulia piece is a complete necklace, and has long-necked horse pendants, and small round shields that are individually connected to the necklace by attachment chains. The extremely rare piece offered here has a dark green patina with dark red highlights, and the dark red highlights are due to a high concentration of tin within the mix of metals. This piece is complete, except for the incomplete hoop, and it sits into the grooves of a clear custom plexiglas display stand. (Another rare analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, and was published in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 58, $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: F. Hirsch collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to culture, date, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1407136
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
These two matching East Greek kylix cups date circa mid 6th century B.C., and are approximately 3.1 inches high, by 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle. These two kylix drinking cups are intact, save for some some minor scrapes, minute chips, and surface scuffs. These pieces also have some attractive root marking, seen mostly on the inner surface, and some spotty black mineral deposits. The inner surfaces also have a thick black glaze, and the main body of these pieces have a raised fluted base. These pieces are very esoteric in design, and are derived from "Attic Little Master" cups. These pieces are also classified as being "East Greek" types, and have been classified as being produced in Rhodes and several East Greek cities such as Ephesos. (See "Excavations at Tocra, 1963-1965, The Archaic Deposits I" by John Boardman and John Hayes, Thames and Hudson, pp. 111-116, no. 1219. See attached illustration.) The two pieces offered here are also nearly identical in form, and were certainly produced in the same workshop as well. These two pieces are excellent examples for the type, and have much of their original glaze. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374723
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This scarce piece is a Greek core-formed glass alabastron, and dates circa mid 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is a brilliant cobalt dark blue glass that has added dark yellow trailing glass, and this dark yellow trailing glass is seen as decorative patterns that were applied on the main body of the vessel. These "zig-zag" and "linear" yellow glass patterns were added to the vessel as it was spinning on a heated rod. This piece also has a short neck, a rounded disk at the lip of the vessel, and two small lug handles seen below the shoulder of the vessel. Glass alabastra of this type were containers for perfumed oils, and their flat rounded rims allowed their precious contents to be dispensed easily in small quantities. As the name suggests, these vessels in glass are probably modeled after those made in alabaster. The exceptional piece offered here is in superb to mint quality condition, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece also has some spotty light to dark white calcite deposits, and these form a thin layer in sections of the vessel. There is also some small minute rounded spalls and cracking with mineralization within, which is normal for authentic vessels of this type. Overall, a superb to mint conditioned piece that has a patina and brilliant color that is much better than what is normally seen. (This piece is also classified as: Grose Class II:B; Harden Form 10, Alabastron Form II:4, and is analogous to the examples seen in: "The Toledo Museum of Art, Early Ancient Glass", by Frederick Grose, Hudson Hills Pub., 1989, nos. 132-133.) A custom Plexiglas display stand is included. Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1293208
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This primitive, but esoteric piece is a Chontal culture seated mother goddess that dates circa 300-100 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 3.4 inches wide, by 1.9 inches thick. This piece was carved from a single piece of hard green serpentine stone, and is an attractive dark green, with spotty light brown and black colors. This piece has a nice patina with some calcite deposits seen in some of the minute veins that run on the outer surface of this piece, and there is some minute root marking as well. In addition, this piece was polished in antiquity, and has a bright surface. This piece is also intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a small excavation mark on the back side. This piece is a "mother goddess" type, and is seen seated and holding her hands to her breasts. This attractive piece is also likely a fertility type piece, as this "mother goddess" emphasizes her breasts that are full of "mother's milk". This piece also emphasizes the Chontal culture artistic style which shows coffee bean eyes, double-line lips, square nose, and incised lines for the fingers and toes. This piece also shows the head slightly angled to the left, which offers this piece a more animated appearance. The Chontal culture is also contemporary with the Mezcala culture, and the design of the Chontal figurines have more rounded and defined features than the Mexcala culture, which tend to have very angular lines and features. The type of piece seen here is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself, and simply sits on the included display base. (For the type see: Carlo Gay and Frances Pratt, "Mezcala", Geneva, 1992.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1274546
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Scythian gold rosette plaque that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches in diameter, by .2 inches high at the raised center, and is a large example for the type. This gold rosette has a dotted border, with eight round floral pedal designs that run around the central element of the piece. This central element is a green glass inlay that is supported by a raised gold band. There is also an additional dotted decorative band the runs around the central glass inlay. This piece was also hand punched into a mold, thus forming the raised designs that are seen on the front side of this striking piece. There is also a minute centering central dot seen on the back side, which is a Greek convention of art during the 4th century B.C. This complete and intact piece also has some black mineral deposits where this piece likely attached to a garment that may have been votive. There are also minute black and dark brown spotty mineral deposits, along with minute root marks that are seen in various sections of the piece. This piece is also not thin gold sheeting, and is solid with some tensile strength, and this is an indication that this is not solely a votive type piece, and may have been worn on special occasions as well. This piece is a floral design with the raised central green glass element, and the green glass likely represents the center of a flower. This piece is also likely from the Black Sea region, and is analogous to gold plaques that have been found there that have floral designs. (See attached photo of an analogous Greco-Scythian floral rosette that was found near ancient Kerch, south of the Sea of Azov. This piece is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. This piece was published in "The Splendor of Scythian Art" by M.I. Artamonov, New York, 1969, no. 149.) These floral designs can be explained by the Greek Eleusinian cult that flourished in the Black Sea region, and the worship of Demeter and Persephone which represented the "change of the seasons" and "birth and rebirth", and these concepts were also associated with the growth of flowers and agriculture. The scarce to rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market and has great eye appeal, as this piece has a brilliant color. This piece can also be worn today, as it is a durable solid example, and it can easily be built into a pendant or necklace. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
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This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1368965
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This exceptional and rare mint state (FDC) Roman gold aureus was minted in Rome, and dates circa 145 A.D. This coin is graded FDC/FDC (mint state), is 7.32 g., and is approximately 20mm. The coin also has perfect centering, extremely high relief, and a great deal of eye appeal. This coin features on the obverse, a young Faustina Junior facing left, with FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL around. She is seen wearing detailed drapery, with layers of hair tucked up into a bun with dotted pearls. Her portrait is simply magnificent, and her face conveys a serene expression. The reverse features a walking dove facing right on a ground line, with CONCORDIA around. This magnificent coin was also struck under her father Antoninus Pius, and commemorated the April 145 A.D. marriage of Annia Galeria Faustina Junior to her material cousin Marcus Aurelius. At the time of the engagement, Antoninus also formally adopted Marcus Aurelius as his heir. The dove on the reverse represents harmony for a stable marriage, as the dove is known to be monogamous throughout its lifetime. A magnificent coin that is likely the finest known for its type. References: RIC III 503b; Strack 507; Calico 2044c; Biaggi 922; BMCRE 1090. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 730. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1304062
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This wonderful coin is a Roman silver serrate denarius, circa 79 B.C., Rome mint, and minted by C. Naevius Balbus, who was the mint master in Rome for the period. This coin is in FDC grade (mint state), is 3.78g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin has a serrated edge, and is known as a "Serrate Denarius", and the added edge work was done to insure that the mint was coining near pure silver. One could inspect this coin and see into the inner flan from the serrated edge, and know that the core of this coin was made from silver and was not plated. This type of coin briefly was the norm during the late Roman Republic period. This attractive coin features: Obv; The diademed bust of Venus facing right, with S.C behind, and Rev; A winged Victory driving a three-horse triga right, control number above, and the lettering C.NAE.BALB in the exergue below. This coin also has a beautiful light gray old cabinet patina, and fine detail can be seen with the horse reigns, minute dotted Victory wings, and the hair of Venus. C. Naevius Balbus, Rome's mint master for 79 B.C., was a supporter of Sulla and his use of Venus on the obverse of this coin, was due to the fact that Venus was the patron deity of Sulla; and the reverse type with the winged victory seen on this coin, also commemorates Sulla's victories against Mithridates VI of Pontus. The use of the three-horse triga on Roman Republican coinage is also rare - previously it occurred in 110 B.C. on the coinage of Appius Cladius, who was also consul in 79 B.C. when this coin was minted. The coin offered here is also one of the finest known examples for the type. Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 531. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: