Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has well-defined mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1384480
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek bronze jewelry mold that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .3 inches thick. This complete piece was cast as one solid piece and has a flat back, a single hole for suspension seen below the rounded top, and two extended handles with mounting holes seen on each side of the main body of the piece. This piece was also likely secured with cords through the extended handles to a flat surface, and the artist was then able to apply pressure to the mold. A thin sheet of gold or silver was placed into the mold, and pressure into the mold with a tool formed half of the body of the acorn. Two halves were subsequently joined together to form the complete decorative acorn that were often strung side-by-side into a necklace. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and appears to have some minute wear from use in antiquity. The bronze mold offered here is extremely rare, and offers some insights as to how ancient jewelry was produced. This piece may also have been suspended by a cord with other molds of various sizes in a workshop. This piece also comes with a custom display stand, can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand, and is an extremely rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #12608. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing piece is a Viking bronze buckle that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 3.4 inches in diameter, and is complete save for a small edge chip. This large example has a detailed hand stamped dotted double border, and a raised central boss that has a hole in the center that is approximately .5 inches in diameter. There is a smaller hole, at the side of the central hole, that has a folded pin within that rotates back and forth. This bronze pin also is complete, and is an intact and functional example. Running around the central hole is a raised floral design that has interlocking features. This floral design is a Viking design that may represent the forces of nature, and was a "protector type" symbol. This piece has a lovely dark to light green patina, and there are traces of gold gilt seen in various sections of the piece. This piece may also have doubled as a decorative brooch, and was held in place with a leather strap. This piece is a superb complete example, save for a small rim chip, and is large for the type. Overall, this piece is a solid piece that can be worn today, and can be worked into a modern setting. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338941
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This attractive Egyptian wooden mummy mask dates to the Third Intermediate Period, 21st-24th Dynasty, 1070-715 B.C. This esoteric piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 4.5 inches wide, by 3 inches deep. This piece was likely from the inner coffin lid of a large sarcophagus. This piece is also solid, and has original light red and black paint over stucco that is adhered to the wooden surface on the front side of the piece. The paint and stucco are both very stable, and there is no flaking or recent cracking of the paint and stucco. This piece has no over paint, is all original, and there has not been any repair/restoration to the piece. This piece has a very esoteric artistic style, and is a much more beautiful piece that what is normally seen for a piece of this type for the period. The eyes are almond shaped, and the mouth has a very sensual look and design. The overall face has a serene expression that this piece easily conveys to the viewer. This piece has a flat back side that is slightly oval, and there is an attachment dowel seen at the top back side, and in addition, this dowel attached this facial section to the main part of the mask. This piece also has very high relief, and the nose is completely intact, along with most of the facial features. Egyptian wooden face masks from this period with the exceptional esoteric artistic style that this piece conveys, have sold for very strong prices in todays market. Another analogous example of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities: "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", New York, Dec. 2004, no. 71. ($50,000.00-$70,000.00 estimates. The Pankow example is slightly larger than the piece offered here, and the facial details are very close in design as well. The piece offered here has a very analogous mouth as the Pankow example, along with the delicate designed nose. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a wonderful example for the type, and is difficult to find with this esoteric artistic style. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Ex: Farag Khodary M. El-Gabry, Cairo, circa 1950's. Ex: Dora and George Mathues collection, Philadelphia, circa 1960's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1295159
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,675.00
This rare piece is a Roman bronze figurine that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This impressive piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This complete piece also has an even beautiful dark blue/green patina with spotty red highlights, and is in excellent condition with no noticeable breaks or chips. This piece is seen standing with the full weight on the left leg, and the other leg is slightly bent while the body is seen slightly leaning to the right. This piece also stands by itself, and is placed on a custom stand for added stability. This piece has extremely refined facial detail, and there are other minute details seen on this piece such as the design of the sandals. The figure seen here may also depict Alexander the Great, as it displays many attributes that are known for this dynamic Greek figure from antiquity. Although this piece is a Roman bronze, the Greek features seen on this piece are unmistakable, such as the Greek muscled cuirass which is worn over the Greek knee-length "chiton", the attached cape "chlamys" which falls behind, and the pose of the figure that is seen with the weight on one leg. In addition, this figure has upswept curls above the forehead known as an "anastole" hair style, along with thick locks of leonine hair, deep set eyes, an angular jaw, and a prominent brow which are all facial features of Alexander the Great. This figure is also seen extending his right arm, and the open upturned hand likely held a missing round "phiale", which held wine that was used for sacrificial offerings to the Gods. This military figure also appears to be in the act of offering wine sacrifice to the Gods, and this type of wine sacrifice using a "phiale" was purely a Greek religious rite, rather than a Roman ritual. It's possible that this figurine reminded the owner in Roman times of Alexander's visit to Troy, as he was the new Achilles - the champion of the Greeks and, as Achilles had done 1,000 years before, he sacrificed in the temple of Athena. Wealthy and cultivated Romans would often engage the topic of Alexander's notable personality, his superhuman accomplishments, and the human fate with their philosophical discourses. It would not be surprising to find his image in the intimacy of a domestic villa. The famous Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum contained a whole collection of several bronze busts representing Greek Hellenistic rulers, Greek poets, and philosophers, which serves as an eloquent example of the cultural preferences of the Roman elite. This figurine also appears to be grasping a Roman sword known as a "gladius", which had a rounded pummel as seen here. The Roman general Marcus Antony also favored Greek dress as seen on this figurine, and this piece may also represent a "duality of portraiture", in that it is a combination of Greek and Roman attributes, and may represent more than one famous individual and/or military leader. What is certain relative to this rare figurine, is that this figure is both a military and religious figure, and this combination is best displayed in the figurine offered here. (Another analogous example of a Roman bronze figurine in the guise of Alexander the Great, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. Approximately 3.75 inches high, circa 1st-3rd century A.D., and complete. $47,500.00 fixed price. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre AD 1000 item #1343481
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This superb piece is a Japanese samurai katana sword that dates to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868 A.D. This piece is approximately 36 inches long, from the tip to the end handle cap. The blade is approximately 28-28.5 inches long, as the tang is centered within the handle wrapping, and this is an approximate size due to the tang being wrapped. This piece was also handle rewrapped by the Royal Ontario Museum under the supervision of David Pepper, who was the curator of the Japanese Arms and Armor Department. He also authenticated this piece to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868, as the tang also has the stamped signature of a swordsmith signed Yoshinao, who lived in Seki City in old Mino, Japan. This swordsmith also had many ancestors with his same name that worked in the same city as well, and are well known for producing many swords during during WWII. It's also extremely likely that the piece offered here was subsequently remounted, in addition to the handle being rewrapped in WWII for use in a Military mount, as all Japanese officers were required to wear a sword. The handle wrappings now seen on the impressive piece offered here likely replaced the old military mounts and wrapping. The handle fittings and bronze round hilt guard (tsuba) now seen on this piece also date to the Edo Period, and may have been original to the piece along with the other handle fittings, and were all incorporated into the original and previous military handle wrappings. This may have been done for traditional reasons, as swords of this type were and are regarding as having a "living energy". This piece was originally made for a samurai warrior in feudal Japan, and was designed for battle using two hands. This remarkable piece also has an extremely fine razor sharp blade, which defines this piece as being among the finest cutting weapons in world military history. One truly has to handle this weapon with care, as this blade is still razor sharp and a slight slip would likely result in injury. The Edo Period fittings also feature a scarce gold gilt protector deity face that is seen peeking out of the handle wrappings on Side A, and in addition, there are gold inlayed symbols and/or lettering seen within the Edo Period round bronze hilt guard (tsuba). The bronze end cap has very elaborated designs as well. This piece was also produced by hammering layers of steel with different carbon concentrations, and this process was very labor extensive and involved several people working together in unison. The extensive hammering removed impurities within the metal, and this resulted in a stronger blade. The constant hammering and cooling of the blade with water also resulted in a wavy line seen on the side of the blade that is called the "hamon", which is made more distinct by polishing. Each "hamon" and each smith's style of "hamon" is very distinct, and is in fact analogous to a fingerprint. The blade on the piece offered here was polished into a mirror like finish, and is in superb condition. The blade surface has some minor and light brown age spots that are not very noticeable which show the age of the blade, and one can easily polish the blade to remove these if one wishes to do so. David Pepper also left this patina to show the age of the blade, and his rewrapping of the handle follows traditional Japanese form and construction. This piece also sits on a custom wooded stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a traditional Japanese work of art, and is one of the most distinctive weapons known in the world today. Ex: David Pepper collection, circa 1960's. Exhibited: Royal Ontario Museum, Canada, circa 1980's. Ex: Paul Haig collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1364438
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare ceremonial stone ball is attributed to the Taino culture, and dates circa 1100-1250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.3 inches in diameter, and is a perfect sphere. This piece is a hard sandstone that is native to the Caribbean region where the Taino culture dwelled, and there also have been many ceremonial ball-courts found in Puerto Rico, where the Mesoamerican ballgame was played with a rubber ball. The piece offered here may have been from this region of the Caribbean as well. This interesting piece features many geometric designs that were minutely hand pecked into the stone, and the designs appear to be a mirror image of one another when one rotates the stone. This piece was definitely a "votive-type" piece, and may also have been a trophy for the ball-game itself. The exact ceremonial nature of this piece is unknown, but what is known, is that this piece was definitely connected to the ceremonial ball-game. This game was also believed to have been played by only bumping the ball with the elbows and torso. This piece also has some minute dark black and gray mineral deposits, and some slight wear in various sections of the piece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display ring. Ex: Throckmorton Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1320798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This superb Mayan "orange glazed" bowl with a glyph band dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 5.25 inches high by 7.75 inches in diameter. This piece is intact, and has some heavy root marking, along with some white calcite and spotty minute dark black mineral deposits. This attractive piece has a flat bottom, and has a graceful rounded body which gradually narrows towards the rim. This piece has a bright "orange glaze" with a red and black band seen just below the rim. Below this decorative red and black banded design, a black painted glyph band is seen running around the vessel that consists of fourteen identical glyphs. The detailed glyph band was also painted from right to left, and the beginning and end of the glyph band is seen, as the last glyph painted does not have the added "speech scrolls". The "speech scrolls" were not added to the last painted glyph, because the artist ran out of room within the overall composition, and could not over paint into the first painted glyph. This repeating glyph is also analogous to the glyph seen in "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Books Inc., New York, 2002, p. 146, Fig. 8-11. (See attached photo.) The glyph seen on the vessel offered here, along with the published glyph noted above, both have "speech scrolls" attached at the left side of the rounded main body of the glyph, and these "speech scrolls" represent a "quotative particle" in Mayan iconography, meaning as the term "quotative" indicates, certain particles (glyphs) attribute phrases to individuals as though these were the figure's utterances or actual speech. In the case of the glyph seen here, it is interpreted as "it is his saying", which may also be interpreted as "this vessel belongs to him". It is interesting to note that this glyph repeats again, and again, around the vessel within the glyph band, and in this case, the presence of this glyph tells us that this object belongs to someone. This type of possessive reference is a well-known reference seen in dedicatory Mayan ceramic texts. The piece offered here is as attractive, as it is interesting, and this type of Mayan ceramic is scarce on the market today. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1169806
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large piece is a "Veracruz" culture standing priest, Remojadas type, that dates from the Classic period, circa 450-650 A.D. This piece is approximately 22.5 inches high, and easily stands by itself on a custom wooden stand. This piece is of an artistic style, known as "Remojadas", which is the name of a particular archaeological site, although objects in closely related styles actually come from a number of different sites in Veracruz. The name "Remojadas" thus refers to objects from south-central Veracruz, generally from the Classic-period. This piece is also known as a "Xipe-Toltec" type priest, as he portrays the god in costume. The "Xipe-Toltec" cult flourished along the Gulf Coast of modern day Mexico during the Classic and early Postclassic periods before gaining a prominent place in the Aztec pantheon, probably as a result of the subsequent Aztec domination of the Gulf Coast in the mid-15th century. Most Xipe figures vividly depict a human inside a flayed skin of another man, and this god was known as "Our Lord the Flayed One". According to Charles Phillips in "Aztec and Maya", Lorenz Pub., London, 2007, p. 62: "Victims killed in honour of Xipe Totec, the god of planting and vegetation, were shot with arrows so that their blood flowed into the earth like life-giving waters. Indeed, the Aztecs called human blood "chalchiuatl" (precious water). The corpse was then flayed and a priest would wear the skin in honour of the god. The rite was a celebration of the splitting of seeds that makes possible the growth of new vegetation each spring." Mary Miller and Karl Taube in "Ancient Mexico and the Maya", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1993, p. 188 also add: "At the time of the Conquest the Xipe festival fell during the spring, in our month of March, and much of its imagery suggests agricultural renewal: as a seed germinates, it feeds off the rotting hull around it, finally letting the new shoot emerge. The Xipe impersonators wore the old skins until they were rotten, when the young man once again emerged." The Xipe-Toltec piece offered here displays a priest wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim, as seen with the rolled skin folds seen hanging below the neck, the skin leggings, the skin bundles tied at the back shoulder and the right hip, and the human skin mask. There are black-bitumen painted highlights seen on the headband with medallions, earplugs, lips, and eyes. There are also black-bitumen painted extruded eyeballs that are seen hanging from the eye openings, and the black lips accentuate an open mouth that shows this dramatic figurine chanting in a ritual posture. This expressive figure is also holding a floral designed fan with petals, which may represent the Xipe ritual of regeneration. This piece is made from a light gray terracotta, and has light tan mineral deposits. This complete piece was repaired from several large fragments, which is usually the case for large-scale Veracruz pieces such as this, and this piece is a better example than what is usually seen. The floral fan is an attribute that is seldom seen as well, and this is a principle reason why this large example is a scarce to rare type. The floral fan also indicates that the individual depicted is likely in the act of performing the "Xipe-Toltec" regeneration ceremony, along with the fact that this priest is seen with an open mouth who appears to be chanting in the act of the regeneration ceremony which ensured the planting and growth of the new years crops. The majority of these figurines are seen simply standing in an upright position, and are not seen holding any implements of any sort, but more importantly, the majority of these Veracruz "Xipe-Toltec" figurines do not display a dramatic facial expression such as this example. (Another Veracruz "Remojadas" example of this type and of the same size is offered in Bonhams African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2012, no. 3. $8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates, $10,000.00 realized.) For the type offered here see: "Ancient Art of Veracruz", Ethnic Arts Council of Los Angeles, 1971, no. 31. The piece offered here is definitely ceremonial in nature, and easily conveys this fact to the viewer, which is not often the case relative to figurines of this type. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bonhams Art & Artifacts of the Americas auction, San Francisco, Sept. 2012, no. 1039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385356
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek "Xenon ware" kantharos, and dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Greek Apulian pottery from southern Italy that also has Greek mainland attributes. This attractive piece has a beautiful deep black glaze, a ring base, looped handles, and a dark orange painted box on each side that features various ivy tendrils and wave designs. There is also some nice minute spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on this mint quality vessel that has no repair and/or restoration. This vessel is scarce in this condition, and is a better example that what is usually seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381605
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is a Chancay canteen type vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 9 inches wide, by 4.5 inches thick through the main body of the vessel. This piece is a scarce "black-on-red" Chancay canteen vessel, as the majority of Chancay vessels are "black-on-cream" type vessels, and tend to be rather thin walled. The piece offered here is very durable, as it has thick walls, although it was a mold-made type vessel. This piece has attractive black geometric patterns seen on a red background on both sides of the vessel, and a raised rounded spout at the top, that also has the face and head of a god built into the spout. The face of the god appears to have tattoos, and has a very prominent nose. The handles of the vessel also double as arms, and there appears to be black painted hands seen at the top of each handle where it meets the spout. The god seen here may depict a Chancay "water-god", as this culture existed in a very arid region in ancient Peru. This intact piece is also in superb condition, with no repair and/or restoration, and has vibrant colors. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note this piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1208989
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern bronze roundel, that dates circa 1000-650 B.C. This rare piece is approximately 2.5 inches in diameter, and it has a concave design. This piece was likely attached to a cloth backing such as a garment, as there are some minute attachment holes seen on the outer flat perimeter band. Its quite possible that this piece could have made up a armored object such as a cuirass, a belt, or a quilted protective garment with several of these attached roundels. The concave design, with a protective inner core of leather or wood, would have offered some added strength. The flat outer perimeter band also has a detailed dotted pattern that runs around the piece, and another larger dotted pattern is seen just inside on the inner concave section of this piece. Centered in the middle of this concave section is a cat-like design which likely represents a lion or lioness, as it has a small upturned tail, paws, and feline ears, nose, and eyes. The stylized design of the head is very interesting, as there is an insect design seen within the head of this animal. This insect resembles a bee or an ant, as seen from the perspective of a top view and looking down. This piece may be from the Luristan, Urartian, or Marlik cultures, as the fabric and artistic style of this piece is analogous to other bronze pieces from those cultures. However, the duality of design is not often seen relative to the cultures noted above, and this piece is rare to extremely rare. This piece likely was used as a "protector type" piece, given the symbols seen on this piece, and this also makes perfect sense as a work of arms. The dark green patina of this piece is exceptional, and there is some attractive spotty light brown and reds seen within this piece. This piece has some minor losses seen on the upper outer edge which does not detract from this attractive piece, and this piece has a great deal of eye appeal. This pieces comes with a custom wooden and clear Plexiglas stand, and simply slips down into the stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258851
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two beautiful pieces are two matching solid Greek gold earrings that date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. These two large examples are approximately 1.2 inches in diameter, and are 1/8 wide at the square terminal ends. These pieces weigh approximately 5.1 grams and 7.7 grams, as one piece has a slightly larger rounded inner hoop diameter, and a slightly larger square terminal end. These large and somewhat heavy pieces were worn through pierced ears, and the square terminal ends held them in place, as the main body of these pieces are rounded to easily run through the pieced ears. These pieces are a scarce type, although they are a simple design, and were easy to adjust to the individual. In this case, the slightly larger inner rounded diameter size of one earring may have been custom made for a wealthy lady in antiquity, who may have had a larger pieced ear hole on one ear than the other. The outer width diameter of both pieces is a perfect match with an approximate diameter of 1.2 inches, although the inner rounded diameter sizes are slightly different from one another, with one hoop slightly thicker than the other. This type of construction is a good indication that these pieces were perhaps custom made for one individual. These pieces are also solid, and have fine etched line design seen on all four sides of the square terminal ends. These pieces also have some minute deposits, extremely minute scratches, and a slight oxidized yellowish patina which is consistent with ancient gold pieces. These solid pieces are also in mint to superb condition with no cracks and/or repair, and are in fact solid enough so that they can even be worn today. These beautiful pieces also hang from a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and have a bright yellow color that can be seen at a great distance. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389637
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a black glazed Colima seated shaman that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 10.8 inches high. This pleasing piece has a deep black lustrous glaze over the entire piece, and is scarce as such, as most Colima examples of this type have a red to reddish brown glaze. This seated shaman is seen gesturing with a left upraised arm, and this arm also forms an open spout. This lively shaman is also seen with his right hand placed on his thigh, "coffee-bean" type eyes, an extended nose, and a serene expression. He is also seen wearing a linear patterned lion cloth that is designed with detailed white incised lines, and these incised designs are seen on both sides of the body. In addition, he is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, and a tall "turban-helmet" with a raised horn that also has side straps that are seen falling to the shoulders. This piece was also likely created as a "protector" type piece, and was an individual that had magical powers. This piece is intact, save for a re-attached left leg, and is 100% original. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example, as it has great detail with the incised decorative elements, and the black glaze that is seldom seen. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1989, no. 100. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: