Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1377965
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb vessel is a Chimu/Lambayeque blackware stirrup-vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This intact vessel is approximately 9.8 inches high, by 5.8 inches in diameter, and has a lustrous solid black glaze with some attractive and minor dark brown burnishing. There is also some minute root marking and spotty black mineral deposits, and this intact piece is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This interesting piece shows four boxes on the upper shoulder, and within each impressed box is a standing "Staff God" deity who is seen wearing a "tumi-type" headdress with raised arms. These "Staff God" figures are also seen with a stippled background, which also makes them a prominent feature to the viewer, and they all appear to be holding a staff in the left hand. This staff was also a symbol of sacred rank and authority. There is also a single beaked bird seen on the raised stirrup-handle, and the vessel has a flat bottom with an "X" pattern. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authentication test document from Kotalla Lab, Germany, no. 08R131017, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1304062
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This wonderful coin is a Roman silver serrate denarius, circa 79 B.C., Rome mint, and minted by C. Naevius Balbus, who was the mint master in Rome for the period. This coin is in FDC grade (mint state), is 3.78g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin has a serrated edge, and is known as a "Serrate Denarius", and the added edge work was done to insure that the mint was coining near pure silver. One could inspect this coin and see into the inner flan from the serrated edge, and know that the core of this coin was made from silver and was not plated. This type of coin briefly was the norm during the late Roman Republic period. This attractive coin features: Obv; The diademed bust of Venus facing right, with S.C behind, and Rev; A winged Victory driving a three-horse triga right, control number above, and the lettering C.NAE.BALB in the exergue below. This coin also has a beautiful light gray old cabinet patina, and fine detail can be seen with the horse reigns, minute dotted Victory wings, and the hair of Venus. C. Naevius Balbus, Rome's mint master for 79 B.C., was a supporter of Sulla and his use of Venus on the obverse of this coin, was due to the fact that Venus was the patron deity of Sulla; and the reverse type with the winged victory seen on this coin, also commemorates Sulla's victories against Mithridates VI of Pontus. The use of the three-horse triga on Roman Republican coinage is also rare - previously it occurred in 110 B.C. on the coinage of Appius Cladius, who was also consul in 79 B.C. when this coin was minted. The coin offered here is also one of the finest known examples for the type. Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 531. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1340583
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
These two rare Mayan pieces are two carved longbones that date to the Late Classic Period, circa 600-900 A.D. These pieces are approximately 4.3 and 4.6 inches high, and are approximately 1 inch in diameter at the widest point of each piece. These two pieces are intricately carved, and each feature the profile of a Mayan lord, who is seen wearing large jade earflares and an elaborate headdress. These pieces are also published in "The Face of Ancient America: The Wally and Brenda Zollman Collection of Precolumbian Art", Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1988, no. 84 (See attached photo.), and the following is the description of these rare pieces by John Carlson: "The headdresses contain images of long-lipped monsters. At the top of the bone pictured to the right is the profile face of some mammalian creature, possibly a peccary, which does have sky associations. The exact function of such carved bones in not known. They may have been handles for fans, bloodletter perforators, or even musical instruments. Some may also have been used as smoking tubes such as are usually depicted protruding from the forehead of God K. Schele and Miller have also discussed two fine examples of Mayan incised longbones; one is from a jaguar, and the other is a deer tibia. Both images and texts portray dynastic rites. Three additional bones published by Von Winning also present royal profile portraits, and two clearly show the drilled holes for suspension. These carved bones may have been worn as pectorals or attached to the costume for use in some specific, but as yet incompletely known dynastic function. In any case, all such carved bones are clearly high-status objects". The pieces offered here do not have any drilled holes for suspension, but could have, as there appears to be some of the leading edge missing on both ends of both pieces. These pieces are nearly complete, and are in superb condition for a perishable material such as bone, and are some of the best known published examples for the type. In addition, the carved bones offered here may be animal or human, and that fact was also unknown to the academics of the reference noted above, as the description reads: "Carved bone (human?)". The two sacred pieces offered here certainly had royal associations, and were likely used in some sacred regal ceremony and/or religious ritual. These two pieces also sit on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Wally and Brenda Zollman collection, circa 1970's. Published: "The Face of Ancient America", circa 1988. Exhibited: Indianapolis Museum of Art, circa 1988. Exhibited: Indiana University Art Museum, circa 1989. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1142779
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This esoteric piece is a Greek Thracian bronze ring that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7-7.5, and has an even dark green patina. This cast piece is in superb condition, and can easily be worn today, as the hoop and bezel is very solid. There is some smooth wear on the inside surface which also indicates that this ring was worn for some time. This ring type dates to the Hellenistic period, and the artistic style is very simplistic, as seen with the "line-designed" stylized animal seen on the front face of the ring. This stylized animal was engraved into the front face, and is seen within an engraved circle that is seen near the edge of the front face. There are also engraved lines seen on each outer edge of the ring as well. The stylized animal has four elongated legs, a raised tail, and two ears or possibly horns. This piece was likely worn by a young adult, and the image seems to convey a great deal of animation and movement. This ring is of exceptional quality, and is a scarce example. A custom ring display stand is included, along with a ring box. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: David Liebert collection, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb and flawless condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1351962
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful Greco-Roman marble bust is a portrait of a young god that dates to the late Hellenistic period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, and was once part of a statuette. This piece portrays a young god wearing a Greek Hellenistic "Attic" type helmet, and has a slightly upturned head, along with the head slightly tilted to the left that is also seen bending away form the angled neck. In addition, the eyes are slightly upturned which is a god-like attribute relative to Greek Hellenistic art. The eyes also being deeply inset also draws the viewer to the fleshy lips that are also added features of early Hellenistic Greek period art that was established by Lysippos, who produced striking portraits of Alexander the Great. (For the artistic style related to the portraiture of Alexander the Great that is attributed to Lysippos, see the attached photo from the "Search of Alexander" exhibit catalog, 1980, no. 25. This photo is of a marble bust of Alexander the Great now seen in the Pella Museum, Greece, and was executed in the 2nd century B.C. as a portrait that represented Alexander as a romantic divinity in the late Hellenistic period.) The attractive marble bust offered here also follows this earlier artistic sculptural style, and is very analogous in artistic style to the Pella example noted above. The piece offered here also likely represents the Greek and Roman war gods Ares and Mars, but the likeness seen here of this young warrior god also represents many known portraits of Alexander the Great, and in effect, this piece could have represented and doubled both as a god and Alexander. (For the portrait type see: A. Stewart, "Faces of Power, Alexander's Image and Hellenistic Politics".) This superb piece has some minor losses to the nose and to the lower chin, otherwise it is a complete example. This piece also has some spotty root marking, and a beautiful light brown patina over a bright white Parian type marble. This piece is an attractive example, and is an excellent representation of late Hellenistic period Greek art which also has exceptional artistic style. This exceptional piece is also mounted on a steel pin along with a custom Plexiglas display base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1386486
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,325.00
This beautiful Greek terracotta dates to the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3.8 inches high. This large bust is intact, and is a complete bust of a very large standing terracotta of a goddess such as Persephone, who is the Greek goddess of harvest and fertility. This esoteric bust has exceptional artistic style, as the head is slightly tilted to the left, and the head is slightly uplifted. The hair is also tied upwards into a bun above the forehead, and the face has a slight smile. This very large bust is in it's natural "as found" condition with it's natural earthen deposits, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 5 inches. For the type see "Tanagra Mythe et Archeologie", Louve, Paris, 2004, fig. 107. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328373
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This complete Greek bronze is a bronze oinochoe pendant and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This piece was a "votive" type piece and was used as an offering at a temple or an oracle site such as Delphi or Dodona. This piece is in the form of an oinochoe which was used primarily for pouring wine, and as a sacred offering, this piece may have contained a wine offering as well. This piece has an attached strap type handle, and was cast as one piece. The interior is also hollow, and is not a solid example. There are also incised lines that run around the vessel, and these linear lines are a hallmark design feature for Greek bronzes from the Geometric Period. This solid cast piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece has a dark black/brown patina, and there are spotty dark brown mineral deposits seen on the outer and inner surfaces. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed as it is mounted with clay. An interesting piece, as well as an early Greek bronze. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1044364
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This visually appealing piece is a large Mayan cylinder vessel that dates circa 400-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 6.9 inches in diameter, is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and sits on four legs that are attached to the bottom base. This piece is a bright orange and black-line polychrome ceramic, which has a "square-cubed" geometric pattern that runs around the entire outer surface. This pattern is likely an imitation of a basket weave pattern, or possibly a textile pattern. Mayan artists also relished imitation of one material with another, particularly in painted media that we read as "trompe l' oeil", in which the eye is tricked, and in the case of the piece offered here, the surface was painted in such a way as to make the observer see woven basketry. In addition, and according to Herbert J. Spinden in "A Study of Mayan Art, Its Subject Matter & Historical Development", Dover Pub., New York, 1975, page 147: "Simple basket weavings appear as painted ornamentation on potsherds from the Uloa Valley (Fig. 204). Complicated braided patterns are common as the rim decoration on pottery from this region, and may have had their origin in the imitation of wicker-work basketry. It is probable that basketry was not of much importance as an art among the Maya, owing to the high development of ceramics." This piece has some heavy spotty black manganese deposits and root marking, which is mainly seen on the bottom and at the bottom edge of the vessel. This piece has some minor minute glaze loss, but overall, it is in extremely fine condition. This piece is also from the Salvador/Honduran region, as the orange and black colors are common for the region, but the type of geometric "square-cubed" pattern that is seen running around the entire vessel is not common, and is a scarce design. This large piece is interesting, has a high degree of eye appeal, and is scarce in this condition with its vibrant color. Ex: C.W. Slagle collection, Scottsdale, AZ., circa 1980's. Ex: Private FL. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1363867
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
This superb Greco-Roman bronze piece is an applique that is in the form of a theater mask, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-early 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.3 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide, by .8 inches in relief. This piece has a flat back with a small raised iron knob, and may have been the terminal end of a vessel handle, or may have been fitted into armor such as a cuirass. The latter scenario is more likely, as the raised knob resembles the remnants of an iron pin which would define this piece as a fitting, or a decorative attachment. This piece has a very well-defined face with sharp eyes, and detailed individual hair with hanging curls. The hanging curls are very detailed, and are very realistic in their design. In addition, this piece has a finely sculpted mouth and rounded chin, which is an artistic style that resembles the earlier Greek facing head coinage from Rhodes. The overall image greatly resembles a Greco-Roman theater mask, or it may also be, and double as a protective Medusa. Whatever the case, this piece is a very fine example, with extremely fine artistic style, very high relief, and a beautiful even dark green patina with minute spotty red highlights. This piece is also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C., and is in nearly Extremely Fine to Very Fine condition (VF+/VF+). The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of a young Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus (VF+) grade. This piece is also perfect for a ring or a pendant. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: