Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This powerful piece is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and likely depicts the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This portrait bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right, as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece is likely a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can also be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This portrait bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as also seen in the bronze portrait bust offered here. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights, and sits on a custom display stand. Ex: New York private collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1384803
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality and beautiful Roman glass flask dates circa 4th century A.D., and is approximately 5.4 inches high. This piece is made from a pale blue-green glass, with a spherical body, concave base, and an extended neck that widens up to the rim. There is also an attractive trailing decoration that spirals around a third of the neck, and has developed a striking iridescence. This trailing neck thread decoration was created to provide a "grip" on the neck, and perhaps doubled as a "stopper" for a wax seal around the top opening of the vessel. This piece also has sections of a multi-iridescent patina with hues of peach, lavender, blue, and green. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal. (For the type see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, no. 403. Classified as: "Galilee Fabric".) Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1264405
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman bronze key that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches long, by .75 inches in diameter for the ring seen at the terminal end. This piece has a beautiful light blue to green patina with some spotty red highlights. This piece is in better condition than most examples, and is a mint quality piece with well defined groves seen at the end. This piece may have fit a personal strong box, or possibly a small door. This type of key is also published in "Handwerk und Berfude in der Romischen Stadt', by Rieche & Schalles, Cologne, 1994, pp. 46-47. This nice piece is a complete example of a Roman bronze key that was individually owned by a Roman with some means. This piece also hangs from a custom stand, and can easily be worn today in a necklace. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1405317
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This lovely piece is Greek Apulian bottle that dates circa 350-340 B.C., and is approximately 4.1 inches high. by 2.9 inches in diameter. This piece is also attributed to the "Chevron Painter", who is also classified by A.D. Trendall as being from the "Darius-Underworld" workshop. (See "Red Figure vases of South Italy" by A.D. Trendall, Thames and Hudson, New York, 1989, pp. 89-94.). This piece has a chevron type pattern, seen below the rim and the neck of this vessel, and this hallmark attribute is one of the principle hallmarks of this painter. In addition, the seated woman has thick arms, a yellow dotted necklace and earrings, and a wavy lower ground-line design of her garment which are additional attributes. In her left hand, she is holding a cista (box), and there is also a name seen below her extended right arm. Her left hand also appears to be pointing to this name. This name is likely "DIONE", who was known to the ancient Greeks as an earth-goddess, a consort of Zeus, and the mother of Aphrodite. The backside of this attractive piece has a dark orange/red acanthus pattern, and a small raised ring base. This piece also has very vibrant colors, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. There are also some minute white calcite mineral deposits that are mostly seen on the bottom of the piece. An exceptional and scarce piece that is of a type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Robert Feuer collection, New York, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,075.00
This mint quality little Greek stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this mint quality condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and has a beautiful thick glozzy black glaze. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74 (var.). SNG Copenhagen 1046 (var.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" lidded mug that dates circa 340-320 B.C., and is approximately 8.2 inches high with the lid, by 4.6 inches in diameter. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen in the top center of the lid, and there is a single female bust, along with a detailed floral and acanthus pattern. There is also a large female bust seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with floral patterns, and a large acanthus pattern below the single "double-ribbed" handle. This goddess is also seen wearing a detailed white and yellow sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with a "dotted and cross" pattern, an elaborate earring, and a dainty white dotted necklace. Her facial features are very pleasing, and she also seems to exude serene eternal youth. This portrait type is commonly known as the "Lady-of-Fashion", and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. The Greek myth of Persephone's abduction and return from the underworld gave rise to the belief that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. The piece offered here is a much better example than what is usually seen on the market, due to it's mint quality condition, vibrant colors, and superb artistic style. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and has a nice dark even black glaze. An analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Sept. 2010, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, no. 142. ($4500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The mint quality piece offered here also has superb artistic style, and is not often seen on examples of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Illinois collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Arizona collection. Ex: Private CO. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1339702
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze armor plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 2.2 inches wide at the top, and the high relief of this piece is about .25 inches. This striking piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some spotty light to dark green mineralization seen mostly on the backside of the piece. In addition, this piece has some spotty gilt "tinning" seen in various sections of the front side of the piece. This piece was likely fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and this cuirass likely had duplicate pieces that were also fitted into the cuirass on the other side of the chest. This piece may also have been interwoven into the fabric of the cuirass, and there is a square attachment slot seen at the bottom of the piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and depicts a very muscular standing nude Mars holding a shield on the ground with his left hand, and in the right, he is holding and leaning on a spear. He is also seen wearing a helmet, and has a cloak draped over his arms. The muscular Roman war god Mars is also seen standing over a sea-panther with a coiled tail, and the entire scene is framed by a dotted border. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most plaques are fragmentary, and are not complete and intact as the exceptional piece offered here. In addition, the majority of Roman armor was constructed with several bronze pieces which attached to a leather and/or fabric cuirass, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This piece is also in mint to superb condition, and has no repair/restoration, cracks, or chips. This type of piece is also analogous to another example that depicts the nude Roman war god Mars standing over a sea-panther, and is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 22, no. 87. (See the attached photo of this piece which is a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipemt", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted into a custom Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: