Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383122
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This scarce Greek Attic piece is a vessel stand, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This appealing piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 3.5 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece is made from a light red terracotta, and there are several dark brown and red glazed concentric circles that are seen mostly on the underside, and on the topside of the raised flat top base. This piece also has a well-designed rounded lip that is slightly raised over the flat top base, and this design feature was an aid in securing a vessel that would have been placed on this stand. This piece also has a wide fluted base, and has two small holes near the edge of the base that were designed to suspend this piece from a small cord. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a scarce Greek Attic ceramic type, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1363479
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This sensual Egyptian bronze figurine likely represents Isis, and dates to the Late Period, 26th-30th Dynasty, circa 664-342 B.C. This beautiful piece is approximately 5 inches high, and is mounted on a wooden base that is approximately 1 inch high, and this wooden base dates to the turn of the century. This standing figurine also has very pleasing and well-defined facial features, along with detailed armbands, wristbands, individual hair strands, and feet. The goddess is seen with her hands straight down by her sides, and is seen wearing a long close fitting dress which accentuates the sensual curves of her body. One can also see that she exudes the concept of fertility with her smiling face and well endowed breasts. This clearly is a goddess that represents fertility and the bounty of the Nile, and Isis was thought to be responsible for the yearly inundation of the Nile that developed from her tears that she shed for the loss of Osiris. This goddess is also seen wearing a broad collar, a finely striated tripartite wig that is seen passing behind her ears, and a uraeus with a raised cobra and a diadem of uraei that is surmounted by raised horns and a sun-disk. She is also seen bare-footed and has a smiling mouth with full lips, and large eyes with tapering eyebrows. The overall design of this sensual piece is very striking, and is a classic example of ancient Egyptian art. This esoteric piece also has an even and beautiful dark brown patina, with some spotty minute traces of gold gilt. This piece was also cast as one piece, and is a solid, intact example with no repair/restoration, save for the extreme tip of one raised horn. Ex: Heinrich Ferdinand Karl Brugsch collection, Berlin, Germany, circa 1864. Ex: Archaeologie, Drouot-Richelieu, "Collection Emile Brugsch-Pacha et a Divers Amateurs", Paris, France, Sept. 30th-Oct. 1st, 1996, no. 497. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2015, no. 12. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1331598
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive brownware ceramic is a Mayan carved bowl that dates circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 9.75 inches in diameter, by 3.7 inches high. This powerful looking piece has a flat bottom with gently curved side walls, and this design made it very easy for catching liquids. This piece has detailed deep carving, within three rectangular panels, and this skilled carving is in the form of a head commonly known as a "Long-Lipped Monster", and was described as such in the Sotheby's reference noted below. This type of Mayan image is rare, although it is a known image relative to Mayan iconography. This rare image is designed in glyph form, and is comprised of a scroll eye, upturned snout, bared fangs, smoke scrolls curling at the back, and sections of crosshatched elements. Each of the three rectangular panels are also separated by two smooth petalled-shaped motifs, and the entire bowl thus has a floral-like appearance. The "Long-Lipped Monster" image depicted here may also represent what is known in Mayan iconography as a "Square-Nosed Serpent" image. According to Andrea Stone and Marc Zender in "Reading Maya Art, A Hieroglyphic Guide to Ancient Maya Painting and Sculpture", Thames and Hudson, London, 2011, p. 227: "This logograph combines ophidian and floral elements in the form of a band that makes several 90-degree turns, suggesting the upturned snout of a sinuous serpent. Eye and nose rest atop the band and beneath are several curly fangs and no lower jaw. This 'square' or 'fret-nosed serpent' is a prominent, albeit esoteric, feature of Maya art. It seems to embody a radiant life force, expelled through the mouth, nose, or center of a flower, and dispersed throughout the universe, much like mana in Polynesia." This logograph is also associated with Mayan ceremonial bloodletting, and it is also quite possible that the Mayan bowl offered here was a part of this ceremony, and this bowl is in essence, a Mayan ceremonial offering bowl. This vessel also has a light yellow/brown polychrome slip seen both over the inner and outer surfaces, and each of the three rectangular panels have traces of white stucco and red cinnabar that are seen down within the low relief areas of the deep carvings. The carvings seen within each of the three rectangular panels are nearly identical, and were each carved individually, such was the skill of the artist. In addition, the inner surface has a black band seen at the rim and a black circle applied to the inner flat base, and resembles a target for ceremonial bloodletting into the vessel. It's also interesting to note that the color red also contrasts with black, and is easily seen. There is also some attractive and extensive root marking and dark black/brown burnishing seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and there are also some spotty minute dark black mineral deposits which are normally seen on authentic vessels of this type. This piece is also 100% original, and was repaired from three large fragments. This limited repair also appears to have been done some time ago. The interior of the bowl is smooth, and also has a thin polychrome glaze on both the inner and outer surfaces. Overall, this piece is a fine example of a carved Mayan vessel, and the detailed and deep carving also gives this piece powerful eye appeal. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1995, no. 170. ($2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1362411
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This superb Roman bronze is a portrait bust of the Roman emperor, Marcus Aurelius, and dates circa 170-180 A.D. This mesmerizing piece is approximately 1.35 inches high, by .8 inches wide, and is a complete bust with most of the lower neck. This piece was part of a figurine, and was broken at the lower neckline, and the bust is a complete example, with no cracks and no other noticeable areas of damage. This realistic portrait bust is in superb condition, and has a beautiful light to dark green patina with some minute red spotty highlights. In addition, there are some light green and blue deposits seen mostly on the inner surface of the piece. This piece is classified as a "Type IV" portrait of Marcus Aurelius, as it shows the emperor in an advanced age with a very full beard. The beard is also divided in the center of the chin that also shows parallel locks of hair. This "Type IV" convention of art can easily be seen on this portrait bust, along with the distinctive arc of hair that frames the forehead. The emperor is also seen wearing a diadem crown in the hair which also signifies the wearer as being regal in status. The overall look of the face also conveys the Stoic nature of this emperor-philosopher, and conveys a peaceful ideal. (For the portrait type see: Klaus Fittschen and P. Zanker, "Katalog Der Romischen Portrats in den Capitolinischen Museen und den Anderen Kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom", 3V., Berlin: P. von Zabern, 1983-2010.) Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus ruled from circa 161-180 A.D., along with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from circa 161 until Verus' death in 169. During his reign, the empire defeated a revitalized Parthian empire, and fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmations with success during the Marcomannic Wars, but it was the Germanic tribes that Marcus fought incessantly with during the remaining years of his rule. The realistic portrait bust offered here was likely created during this time, and is likely a provincial portrait, which may also have been in a private shrine where the Roman legions were stationed near Germania along the Danube. Whatever the case, this portrait served a Roman well in the period in which it was created, and is an excellent image of this important emperor. This attractive piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Switzerland. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1182929
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This extremely rare piece is an Egypto-Minoan terracotta jar that dates circa 2nd Millennium B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has some spotty light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of the piece. In addition, there are some minute root marks and fibers that are seen within some earthen deposits that are seen mostly on the stem base of the piece. This piece has a smooth inner surface, and on the outer surface, there are panels of incised lotus leaves that are seen running around the vessel from top to bottom. There are also eight punched holes evenly spaced around the vessel, which served as holes which likely strained liquid from inside the vessel, and this left a heavier mixture of material in the bottom half of the vessel. There is also an applied strap handle that is seen on one side of the piece, and the upper lip of this vessel also has an overhang on the inside, and this allowed one to easily pour and strain more liquid from this piece. This type of vessel may have been used in the production of a beverage such as beer, which required the straining of fermented water. The stem base of this piece is also analogous to both Egyptian and Minoan vessels that were produced circa 1800-1500 B.C. (See "Minoan and Mycenaean Art" by Reynold Higgins, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1971, pp. 38-40, figs. 30,31,32, 74 and 75. See attached photos.) This piece is an extremely rare vessel which also has an Egyptian motif in the form of the incised herringbone lotus leaf design. Ex: International Diamond Corp. Collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1975-1986. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1986-2011. Ex: Superior Galleries, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1326070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This nice Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, by 5.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This rare piece has a dark gray patina with dark brown highlights, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from five separate parts: the main hand beaten body of the piece, two cast handles, a ring base, and a round base tubular extension. The main body of the piece also has an attractive "volute fluted" pattern that runs around the main body of the vessel, and several hand punched dots that are seen running around the base of the rim. This superb piece is intact, and has some limited repair, with only the secure reattachment of the handles and footed base which appears to have been done some time ago. There are three short and visual stress cracks that are seen running down from the upper rim into the main body of the piece that are about .3 inches, but other than that, this piece is a superb example that is intact, and is a solid example. These cracks were likely the result of ground pressure, and also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The overall design of this esoteric Greek vessel is rare, especially with the volute pattern and the "flat handles" that are normally seen on subsequent Roman period vessels. A silver vessel kantharos cup seen in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", by D.E. Strong, London, 1966, p. 114, dating from the second century B.C., has analogous "flat handles" as the vessel offered here, and is described as having two "long horizontal thumb grips". This piece featured by D.E. Strong is now seen in the National Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and is also described as being a "Greek vessel with elaborate ornament". The Greek vessel offered here may also be among the first vessels of this type with a "flat handle" design, and was the Greek prototype for the subsequent Roman period silver kantharos type cups that had this analogous "flat handle" design. The piece offered here not only is a rare example that has an esoteric design, but it also has superb eye appeal and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258851
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two beautiful pieces are two matching solid Greek gold earrings that date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. These two large examples are approximately 1.2 inches in diameter, and are 1/8 wide at the square terminal ends. These pieces weigh approximately 5.1 grams and 7.7 grams, as one piece has a slightly larger rounded inner hoop diameter, and a slightly larger square terminal end. These large and somewhat heavy pieces were worn through pierced ears, and the square terminal ends held them in place, as the main body of these pieces are rounded to easily run through the pieced ears. These pieces are a scarce type, although they are a simple design, and were easy to adjust to the individual. In this case, the slightly larger inner rounded diameter size of one earring may have been custom made for a wealthy lady in antiquity, who may have had a larger pieced ear hole on one ear than the other. The outer width diameter of both pieces is a perfect match with an approximate diameter of 1.2 inches, although the inner rounded diameter sizes are slightly different from one another, with one hoop slightly thicker than the other. This type of construction is a good indication that these pieces were perhaps custom made for one individual. These pieces are also solid, and have fine etched line design seen on all four sides of the square terminal ends. These pieces also have some minute deposits, extremely minute scratches, and a slight oxidized yellowish patina which is consistent with ancient gold pieces. These solid pieces are also in mint to superb condition with no cracks and/or repair, and are in fact solid enough so that they can even be worn today. These beautiful pieces also hang from a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and have a bright yellow color that can be seen at a great distance. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363343
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This lovely piece is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter through the center of the vessel. This piece features an elongated strap handle that is approximately 5.5 inches high, from the top of the handle to where it attaches to the main body of the vessel. This strap handle also has two small, finely worked rivets that attach this handle to the lip of the vessel, and a heart shaped applique, on the other end of the handle, which is attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece has a flat bottom and stands very stable, as this piece is well balanced. This exceptionally well designed piece also has a raised lip that allowed for better control of a precious liquid, such as an oil-based unguent, and this may also have been the primary function of the raised strap handle. This piece likely served as an accessory for a woman's toilet cabinet, and is an extremely rare design. This piece has a beautiful dark and light green patina with dark red highlights, and has some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and the raised strap handle is remarkably intact and complete. An exceptional Greek bronze vessel that is also a rare type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385018
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, weighs 16.9 gms, and grades superb quality (EF+) to (FDC) mint state. This beautiful piece features on the obverse (Obv.) the young bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style that what is normally seen. The young dainty features portray an eternally young goddess, and this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. The entire obverse design also portrays a Macedonian hoplite shield, and the outer rim shows Macedonian royal stars seen within semi-circles. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First Region.). There is also an (A) monogram seen within the framing ivy wreath, and this may refer to Amphipolis. The coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and subsequently, no coinage was struck in the region for another half century. This piece has some mint luster, is in superb condition, and an exceptional artistic style which all make this beautiful coin scarce on the market. An exceptional Greek coin struck under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7; Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362320
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This superb graded ancient Greek coin is a silver didrachm that is attributed to the island of Corcyra (Corfu), and dates circa 229-180 B.C. This coin has an extremely large flan that is approximately 23mm in diameter, weighs 4.7 gms, and is superb condition (EF+/EF+). The obverse (Obv.) features the ivy wreathed bust of a young Dionysus facing right, within a dotted border; and the reverse (Rev.) shows the winged Pegasus flying right, with a ships prow symbol and a (PK) monogram below, and a (APK) monogram above. This coin is also perfectly centered and has an extremely large flan which shows all the elements noted above on the reverse, and this is rarely seen on this scarce issue. This coin may also have been over-struck over another coin, and during the minting process, the flan was hammered several times before being struck, and this may also explain the extremely large size of the flan. This coin also has high relief which is also seldom seen on this issue. This coin was also likely minted shortly after the island surrendered to the Romans circa 229 B.C., and it became a Roman protectorate. Although this coin is classified as being a Greek coin, it technically is a Roman coin, not only because of it's minting technique, but also because of the artistic style of the issue. This coin in fact has very analogous artistic style to many Roman Republic issues. The coin offered here is one of the best recorded examples, and is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition, centering, and extremely large flan. References: HGC 6, 65; Sear 2027. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338758
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This attractive Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This large piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 5.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This scarce piece has a nice even dark gray patina with spotty dark black highlights, and in addition, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from four separate parts: the main "mastos type" cup body, the cast stem base, and the two (2) applied strap handles. The main body is a 'mastos type" cup design, and pieces of this type are often seen and offered on the market as a singular cup. This mastos cup, that doubles as the main body of this vessel, was hand beaten and spun on a lathe into the oval shape that is now seen. The upper lip has an attractive indented surface below the lip that is an esoteric design that took a great deal of skill to produce. The cast stem base was added at the bottom center, and the two applied handles were applied possibly in antiquity some years after this stemmed vessel was produced. It is also possible that the stem base and the two handles were added together in antiquity as well, which produced an elegant table vessel that could stand by itself. The two applied strap handles also have attractive "cross hatching" designs that were hammered into the outer surfaces. This superb piece is intact, and there are some minor scratches, some minor dents, and root marking which is normal for a vessel of this type, and these features also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The "mastos type" body is also defined by D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 107-109, Fig. 24. (The piece offered here is a "deep conical type" as seen in Fig. 24, no. a. See attached photo.) The piece offered here not only is a scarce type that has an esoteric design, but it also has great eye appeal and was expensive to produce in antiquity. A silver vessel of this type could only have been on the table of a wealthy individual. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1246377
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C. This appealing and large scale piece is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, and is mint quality with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a dark brown glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this piece has two lines seen on the body above the raised footed base, and has a dark brown line pattern seen on the upper flat rim. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown glaze seen on the majority of these large scale pieces is mostly worn away. The reason for this, is that the dark brown glaze is very thin, and was applied simply as a "wash type" glaze over the light tan clay before it was fired in the kiln. However, the attractive dark brown glaze, seen on the exceptional piece offered here, is mostly intact. This type of "Messapian" piece is also much rarer than the more common Greek "Apulian" and "Lucanian" column-krater types, and according to A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18: "The shapes used for South Italian vases in the fifth century were largely derived from Attic models (see Glossary of Shapes); later, some local forms were introduced, amoung which the most characteristic are the nestoris or trozzella (in Lucanian, e.g., cat. nos. 4, 10, and 11, and Apulian, e.g., cat. no. 134), which seems to have been of native, probably Messapian origin, and the bail-amphora (in Campanian e.g., cat. no. 90, where it goes back to the black-figure prototypes of the sixth century). Many shapes are common to all fabrics (e.g., bell-and calyx-kraters, lekanides, hydriai, lebetes gamikoi, oinochoai, skyphoi); for others there were decided local preferences. Thus the loutrophoros and phiale (dish) are confined to Apulia; the volute-krater, column-krater, Panathenaic amphora, pelike, kantharos, and rhyton are rarely found outside of Apulia and Lucania; the neck amphora, bottle, and skyphoid pyxis are common only in the western fabrics." The piece offered here is also likely votive, and this also explains it's mint quality condition. The bottom is also closed, and this vessel may have held a votive offering such as grain for use in the afterlife. This piece has some heavy white calcite deposits and some minute root marking, as this attractive column-krater is in mint "as found" condition. This piece is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy near and around ancient Taranto on the Adriatic coast. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery in southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1249809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Attic Sessile Kantharos, that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is also classified as being of the "Saint-Valentin Class". This attractive piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is repaired from several large tight fitting fragments, and is 100% original. What makes this piece better than most examples of this type, is that there is no glaze loss, and the bright glossy glazed surface is seen with a deep black, a bright white, and a vibrant light orange color. This piece has on each side a dotted checker-pattern, a band of laurel in added white, and vertical lines seen above and below. The dotted checker-pattern is very detailed, and is designed in a rectangular box like a tesserae floor mosaic. This piece also has a black dot pattern on the bottom, and a deep black glaze is seen within the vessel. There are also some white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom surface as well. Another analogous vessel of this type and condition is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Morven Collection of Ancient Art", New York, June 2004, no. 362. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here has an exceptional glossy surface with a detailed painted design, is a better example than most pieces of this type, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367222
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This exceptional piece is an X-large Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th century B.C. This beautiful extremely large piece is approximately 16.75 inches high, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the upper shoulder. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and this is also rare for a large-scale vessel such as this, as they are normally broken at the neck. The elongated neck seen on this beautiful piece gracefully extends upward, and this section of the vessel has an attached handle with an open flat-lipped spout. There is also a very small hole in the body, seen centered below where the handle attaches to the main body of the vessel, and this was added in order to speed and control the flow of liquid from the vessel, due to it's large size and the small opening through the elongated neck. It's quite possible that this small hole was added during a funeral ceremony in antiquity, as vessels of this type were used to pour votive libations. This piece also has a great deal of original white-ground material that was applied to the main body of the vessel, and in addition, there are spotty black mineral deposits mixed with this material, and these deposits are also seen on various sections of the vessel. The main body of this attractive piece also gradually tapers down in diameter, from the upper shoulder to the bottom round ring base, and this gives this piece a very elegant shape. This piece also has a flat bottom and this vessel stands very solid as well. Greek Attic white-ground lekythos of this type were used primarily for funeral rites, and often had fine-line figural design over the white-ground surface. These vessels were often placed in the tomb as a votive offering, and were often brought to the tomb as votive offerings by the family of the deceased. The fact that the small hole was added to the vessel is also a good indication that this piece was actually used in a funeral rite, and was then left as a votive offering. The vessel offered here is much larger than what is normally seen, and is rare not only for it's size, but also for it's intact condition. This Greek Attic ceramic also has a high degree of eye appeal, and is extremely graceful on display. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #905917
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This dramatic piece is from the La Tolita culture that is from northern Ecuador, Esmeraldas region. The La Tolita culture takes its name from a famous site that is located on an island at the mouth of the Santiago River. This superb piece dates circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., is a light brown terracotta, and is approximately 3.75 inches high by 4 inches wide. This piece is a mask that depicts a simian and/or shaman, and the expression is quite dramatic, as the fine detail of the teeth and nose is easily seen. What makes this mask so interesting is that this mask may represent a simian in a state of transformation, from animal to man, or vice-versa, and it may also represent a shaman with a mask who is seen representing this state of being. This transformation may also have been drug induced, as this culure was known to have used drugs in ceremony. This mask is also votive, and may have served as a spirit mask for a mummy bundle or effigy. There are several holes that run around the edge of this piece that may have been used for attachment. This piece is intact, and has no repair/restoration. There is also some original light white paint that is seen in some of the sections of this piece, along with some spotty dark black/brown mineral deposits. This piece is better than most examples that have been on the market, and is analogous to the example seen in the Museo Arqueologico y Galerias de Arte del Banco Central de Ecuador, Quito. (See "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, p. 432, no. 573.) This piece comes with a custom black plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed, as the mask simply hangs from a pin. Ex: Peter Hacintos collection, New York. Ex: Private Florida collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: