Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1237476
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,625.00
This animated piece is a squatting figurine that is from the Nazca-Wari culture, circa Middle Horizon, 600-700 A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 5 inches high, and has a flat bottom base. This figurine likely represents a squatting male who is seen holding a ball upwards with his right hand, and his left hand is also raised to his left ear lobe which appears to be bleeding. This blood is also seen running down his left arm, and his facial expression is very animated with his crooked mouth. This crooked mouth may also be a representation from his injury to the left side of his head, which also may represent a stroke and/or a cranial injury. The figurine is also seen wearing a cloak with geometric patterns, and it may be that the person depicted here may also have been a ballplayer. The raising of the ball in his right hand may also be a sign of victory in the ancient Mesoamerican ballgame, and this may depict the point of victory in the game. This piece is also a ceremonial whistle vessel, and makes a high pitched noise when one blows into the bottom opening seen at the back side of this piece. There is also an opening for the whistle seen at the back side, and also two openings for the missing stirrup spout. This piece may also have been ceremoniously broken when it was buried, with the stirrup spout discarded, and perhaps this was linked to the fact that this piece may have portrayed an actual person. This piece was also collected by Dr. Ernst J. Fischer who collected Pre-Columbian ceramics that displayed medical related diseases and/or conditions. The condition of this piece is also superb to mint quality, and is intact save for the missing stirrup handle. The white, gray, light red, and black colors are very vibrant, and have a high degree of eye appeal. This piece was also one of the favorite pieces of Dr. Fischer, and is one of the rare examples of Andean Pre-Columbian art that likely displays a medical condition such as an injury and/or stroke of an individual. In addition, the injury depicted here may have been self inflicted and/or initiated to relieve the condition of stroke, but it is more likely that this injury was the result of playing in the ballgame. It is also interesting to note that the face of this individual is divided into two parts, with one half of the face depicted in light red, and the other half, in light gray. This piece is also a rare medical related type of ceramic, and is seldom seen on the market. An analogous piece from this culture was offered at Sotheby's African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 2014, no. 203. (See attached photo. This complete open-topped vessel is approximately 5.5 inches high, and has analogous colors/design relative to the tunic and bilaterally colored face. $10,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates, $68,750.00 realized.) Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1989, no. 337. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Contemporary item #817549
Apolonia Ancient Art
Price as ordered. Kindle version available at: http://www.amazon.com!
If you are a neophyte or an advanced collector of ancient art, "Into the Antiquities Trade" by Kevin R. Cheek is a valuable resource and a "must read" for every collector. This book defines and explains the political situation relative to the trade, as seen in the chapter "Who's Who", and clarifies the "pro" and "con" positions that the three different camps take regading the trade. This book also offers the collector a refreshing viewpoint that "there is no better preserver of ancient art than the private collector". This book also has a chapter "Some Things to Look For" that is useful for many collectors, especially when they are considering a purchase of ancient art. In addition, this chapter has information relative to the testing of ancient works of art for authenticity, and the detection of forgeries. This chapter also helps to explain market pricing, and the use of descriptions/terms such as "repair", "as found", and "restoration". The Kindle version can be found at: www.amazon.com! This book is also offered in both soft and hard cover, and can be ordered online at: http://www.amazon.com. This book can also be ordered at your local bookstore, including additional bookstores found through Google. ISBN Hardcover: 1-4134-3194-1. ISBN Softcover: 1-4134-3193-3. You may also order a signed copy direct from the author, Kevin R. Cheek, by calling 305-785-5315 or 303-321-7351, or email: apoloniaco@aol.com.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1304062
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This wonderful coin is a Roman silver serrate denarius, circa 79 B.C., Rome mint, and minted by C. Naevius Balbus, who was the mint master in Rome for the period. This coin is in FDC grade (mint state), is 3.78g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin has a serrated edge, and is known as a "Serrate Denarius", and the added edge work was done to insure that the mint was coining near pure silver. One could inspect this coin and see into the inner flan from the serrated edge, and know that the core of this coin was made from silver and was not plated. This type of coin briefly was the norm during the late Roman Republic period. This attractive coin features: Obv; The diademed bust of Venus facing right, with S.C behind, and Rev; A winged Victory driving a three-horse triga right, control number above, and the lettering C.NAE.BALB in the exergue below. This coin also has a beautiful light gray old cabinet patina, and fine detail can be seen with the horse reigns, minute dotted Victory wings, and the hair of Venus. C. Naevius Balbus, Rome's mint master for 79 B.C., was a supporter of Sulla and his use of Venus on the obverse of this coin, was due to the fact that Venus was the patron deity of Sulla; and the reverse type with the winged victory seen on this coin, also commemorates Sulla's victories against Mithridates VI of Pontus. The use of the three-horse triga on Roman Republican coinage is also rare - previously it occurred in 110 B.C. on the coinage of Appius Cladius, who was also consul in 79 B.C. when this coin was minted. The coin offered here is also one of the finest known examples for the type. Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 531. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce piece is a Colima effigy deer vessel that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.5 inches long, by 6.5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This exceptional Colima vessel depicts a standing deer, with the sides of the body decorated with incised panels that frame two doubled-headed spiders. In addition, there is an incised diamond pattern seen on the frontal shoulders below the raised neck. The head is designed with a pointed nose and peaked ears, and there is a broad spout that forms the tail. This piece has a thin reddish-brown glaze, and some minute tan earthen deposits. This type of vessel is scarce to rare, as it depicts a standing deer, rather than the usual Colima dog types. (For the type see: "Fine Pre-Columbian Art from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Wray, Harmer Rooke galleries, Oct. 9, 1984-Jan. 1985, no. 112.) The piece offered here may also represent a sacred "protector type" piece that was made for the after-life. Ex: Private Florida collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1991, New York, no. 365. ($1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates, $1,100.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the Sotheby's information that describes this piece as an "effigy deer figurine".) .I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. This solid piece can also be modified with a modern clasp, and can easily be worn today. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
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This attractive Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is extra large in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #824649
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This interesting piece is from the Jama-Coaque culture that lived in the tropical forest coast region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River. This area is also the region where the Spaniards first encountered the native South Americans. The piece offered here is approximately 10 inches high, dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is intact, save for some missing coffee bean ends seen on the headdress and a very small section of the headdress behind the right ear, and this may have been done as this piece was a burial offering. These breaks appear to be very old, as there is wear in the break areas with burial deposits, and this may have been done to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece for burial. The seated figurine may be a shaman that is seen wearing a headdress, shirt, earrings, and nose ring that are decorated with coffee bean symbols. He also has coffee bean designed eyes and is seen holding a lime pot in his right hand and in his left, a coca pod. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) There are traces of painted designs seen on the lower legs, headdress, and skirt. This piece has spotty black mineral deposits and some minute root marking. An example and type that is now scarce on the market. Ex: Private Arizona collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1404947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This intact piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.2 inches high. This piece has an attractive dark green patina, and some spotty light mineral deposits. This piece was cast as one solid piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods are seen wearing the winged cap known as a "petasus". The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. The figurine seen here is also seen holding a money bag in his extended right hand, and this was to offer the owner of this piece fortune in commerce. This piece also has a square built-in base, and this piece stands by itself. The piece offered here is very simple in design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's also very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a temple or shrine. This piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364381
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This group of twenty Greek and Roman gold beads and fittings date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd century B.C., to the late Roman Imperial Period, circa 3rd century A.D. This group ranges in size from approximately .1mm in diameter, to 12mm in diameter for the larger round beads. All of the gold pieces together weigh approximately 9.1 grams. The pieces in this group all have an attachment hole for the stringing of a necklace, or possibly for a bracelet in antiquity. Some of the beads and fittings have minute detail, and would make an excellent addition to a modern work of jewelry, or an ancient gold display. A nice group of ancient jewelry with many shapes and sizes. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398232
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This complete and interesting piece is an Egyptian-Phoenician carved hard stone beetle scarab that dates to the 25th-27th Dynasties, circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches long, by .8 inches wide, by .5 inches high, and is a complete and solid example. This piece was carved from a hard stone, and has a light brown/yellow patina with some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and has clear carved lines relative to the body of the beetle seen on the top side, and the images seen on the flat back side. The flat back side has a carved winged dotted disk seen above, a horned animal at each side, a rabbit below, and a horned ram's head at the center. These animals may also represent reproduction and the continuance of life, and for the ancient Egyptians, the scarab beetle represented rebirth and regeneration. This type of piece was also copied by the Phoenicians who used this type of piece in jewelry. This piece has a bow-drilled hole that runs through the center, and this piece may have been part of a necklace, and may also have served as a votive burial object. Objects of this type for this period were usually made from faience, and were not carved from a hard stone as this fine example. This piece also has a custom display stand, and one can turn this piece to show both sides as well. For the type see: John Boardman, "Classical Phoenician Scarabs: A Catalog and Study", Archaeopress, 2003. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394012
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This intact and x-large piece is a Colima standing shaman/priest that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 17.8 inches high. This powerful piece has a dark red glaze that covers the entire piece, and has some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits, along with some attractive root marking. This figure is seen holding a rattle in his left hand, and a curved implement in his right which may be a ceremonial knife. He is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, short trunks, and a domed helmet/headdress that also has a spout emerging from the top of the head. His upper torso is also completely nude, save for the shell pectoral that is seen in the center of his chest. This powerful looking figure is also seen with a drug induced trance-like expression, and has narrow "coffee bean" type eyes that enhance his look. This figure appears to be conducting a religious drug induced ceremony, and this figure is likely a shaman/priest. This piece also stands very solidly, and is somewhat heavy, as it is a thick walled ceramic. A scarce piece for the culture, as it is also in intact condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1989, no. 105. ($1,500-$2,000.00 estimates, $2,860.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: