Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,800.00
This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338941
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This attractive Egyptian wooden mummy mask dates to the Third Intermediate Period, 21st-24th Dynasty, 1070-715 B.C. This esoteric piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 4.5 inches wide, by 3 inches deep. This piece was likely from the inner coffin lid of a large sarcophagus. This piece is also solid, and has original light red and black paint over stucco that is adhered to the wooden surface on the front side of the piece. The paint and stucco are both very stable, and there is no flaking or recent cracking of the paint and stucco. This piece has no over paint, is all original, and there has not been any repair/restoration to the piece. This piece has a very esoteric artistic style, and is a much more beautiful piece that what is normally seen for a piece of this type for the period. The eyes are almond shaped, and the mouth has a very sensual look and design. The overall face has a serene expression that this piece easily conveys to the viewer. This piece has a flat back side that is slightly oval, and there is an attachment dowel seen at the top back side, and in addition, this dowel attached this facial section to the main part of the mask. This piece also has very high relief, and the nose is completely intact, along with most of the facial features. Egyptian wooden face masks from this period with the exceptional esoteric artistic style that this piece conveys, have sold for very strong prices in todays market. Another analogous example of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities: "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", New York, Dec. 2004, no. 71. ($50,000.00-$70,000.00 estimates. The Pankow example is slightly larger than the piece offered here, and the facial details are very close in design as well. The piece offered here has a very analogous mouth as the Pankow example, along with the delicate designed nose. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a wonderful example for the type, and is difficult to find with this esoteric artistic style. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Ex: Farag Khodary M. El-Gabry, Cairo, circa 1950's. Ex: Dora and George Mathues collection, Philadelphia, circa 1960's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363891
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek silver cup that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.9 inches high, by 4.65 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This beautiful piece has a flat bottom, and easily stands by itself. This attractive piece also has a slightly flared rim, and graduates in size down to the flat base, and overall, this piece has a very esoteric shape and a high degree of eye appeal. This vessel also has a light to dark gray patina with some attractive spotty light gray mineral deposits. These attractive mineral deposits are not only a mark of authenticity, but they also show that this piece has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. There is also some minute root marking and scratches, which is normal for a vessel of this type, and there is no repair/restoration. This piece may also have been produced in ancient Thrace, and may also have been produced for the Scythian market. For the type see: D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 84-86. The piece offered here is scarce to rare, and overall, is a superb example seldom seen in this condition on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1382661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek terracotta applique of a god, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide, and is a complete example that was mounted on the wall of a ceramic or a handle. On the custom Plexiglas display stand, this piece has a total height of approximately 6 inches high. The wall of the ceramic and/or handle is seen on the backside of the piece, and this piece was mold made, and then was subsequently applied to the vessel. This complete piece has no restoration and/or repair, and has some minute earthen deposits. This powerful piece is a nice applique portrait of a god who is likely a young Herakles, as he is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress, has upturned curled hair, and a young face. The portrait may also double for a young Alexander the Great, as there are many representations from antiquity of Alexander that are of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1181942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This interesting and lively Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This mint quality piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and minute root marking seen on the upper end of the spout and near the lower base of the vessel. This piece has a lively running deer, seen on each side of the vessel, and each deer faces a central dividing "double-bar" symbol which is seen at the front of the piece. This "double-bar" symbol may also represent a sacrificial "tumi", but more likely it simply is a "tie symbol", with a rope and/or cloth tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated Figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or scarifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". The dark red lively running deer are seen against a cream background, and are vibrantly portrayed with an upturned tail, a "floral-leaf" designed ear, an antler reaching forward at the top of the head, and a protruding hanging tongue. This piece also has a conical projection from the the top of the vessel, along with a seated frog that is seen centered at the top within a red fineline petal design, and the conical projection has an attached red stirrup handle seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial sacrificial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb I, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp. 96-97, fig. 10. See attached photo.) The ceremonial sacrificial club also is associated with the "tie symbol" and the lively running deer seen on this vessel, as they may represent deer that are portrayed as being part of a Moche ceremonial deer hunt. According to Christopher Donnan in "Deer Hunting and Combat", seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru", Thames and Hudson, 1997, p. 54-55: "Deer are known to run with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. No other animal in Moche art is shown in this way. Deer are known to run with their tongues out when they are winded or tired, and the artists may have intended to show them in this state. Moreover, when a deer is killed, the tongue will often drop out the side of the mouth through a gap that exists between the deer's incisor and molor teeth. In Moche deer hunting scenes, hunters consistently wear elaborate clothing, headdresses, and ornaments-attire that is altogether unsuited to the stalking and killing of deer. To understand why they are dressed this way, it is useful to consider the ethnohistoric records describing the great hunts practiced by the Inca. The best account is of a hunt held by the Inca ruler, Manco Inca, near the valley of Jauja in honor of Francisco Pizarro around 1536. On that occasion, 10,000 Indians formed a ring around an area 30 to 60 miles in circumference. They then closed toward the center, driving all the animals in the area before them, and forming several concentric rings as their circle grew smaller. When the circle was small enough, designated hunters entered it and killed as many animals as was desired." It's also quite possible that the deer seen on this vessel are portrayed at the point when they were ceremoniously killed, and that they were killed primarily for their blood for it's use in ceremony. In addition, the "floral-leaf" designed ear may also represent a deer's ear that has been engorged with blood from stressed running. The Moche placed a great deal of importance to the deer hunt, and the piece offered here shows artistic features that point to this fact. This mint quality piece is a scarce example of Moche fineline ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 279006, dated July 6th, 1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374571
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This brilliant Roman glass flask dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high. This piece is mint quality, and has no cracks and/or chips. This piece is a dark orange-brown amber colored glass, and has an extended flat lip with a folded rim, along with an elongated neck. This piece is also relatively "thick-walled", and has a very durable compact design. This vessel's globular body, with a wide elongated neck that is a third of the vessel's height, is also a hallmark design of early Roman Imperial Period glass. This piece has an exceptional brilliant "reddish-gold" multi-iridescent patina, and there is a thin silvery iridescent film patina layer seen on various sections of the vessel. This attractive silvery layer also fills into some heavy root marking as well. This type of Roman glass vessel is also classified as being "mid 1st century A.D." by John Hayes in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, pp. 34-35, no. 101. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv. #P33-059-012614a. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1357890
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete and detailed piece is a Roman bronze eagle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is a standing Roman eagle that is seen looking left, and has very realistic features. This piece has very detailed feathers seen on the outstretched wings, and well-defined dotted eyes. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This ceremonial piece was likely in a private Roman shrine known as a "lararium", and may also have been worshipped by a Roman legionnaire, as the Roman eagle represented Rome itself and was the symbol of the Roman military. This realistic piece also stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1224537
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This cute little piece is a pendant from the Zapotec culture that dates circa 200 B.C.-200 A.D. (Monte Alban II period). This piece has earlier Mezcala artistic influence, and a myriad of small monkey/squirrel pendants of this type were produced as early as 300 B.C. in western Mexico by the Mezcala culture. This complete piece is approximately 1.9 inches high by 2 inches long, and stands upright on its own, which also points to the skill of the artist, as most of these examples do not stand on their own. This piece is carved from an attractive green serpentine (green diorite) which has several light brown and white inclusions, and some minute stress cracks within the stone. This piece has Zapotec artistic style as seen with the extended thin lips, Roman style nose, and incised line work on the upper head. This piece is also a "transformation" type piece, as the seated monkey has humanoid anthropomorphic facial features. This piece also has a small bow-drilled suspension hole seen between the back and raised tail, and this piece likely served as a "protector" type pendant. This piece has bow-drilled eyes, and were likely inlaid with a colored stone. There are heavy white calcite and black mineral deposits seen within the two eyes, and the small suspension hole. In addition, there is some dark brown mineralization seen deep within some of the minute stress cracks of the stone. There is also a light brown patina seen on the outer surface, and some traces of red cinnabar seen on the low relief areas of the piece. A lively piece with a great deal of eye appeal with an exceptional patina, and is a scarce type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) This piece also sits on a custom black/Plexiglas stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1377885
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb vessel is a Chimu/Lambayeque blackware stirrup-vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This intact vessel is approximately 8.5 inches high, and has a solid black lustrous glaze with some attractive dark brown burnishing. There is some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and this intact piece is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece shows a bust of a god with projecting serpent heads on each side of the central spout, four panels on the upper shoulder with facing nobles with collars and crested "tumi-type" headdresses, and a single handle with two attached prone adoration figures that are facing one another. The god bust has fine incised facial details, and may represent the legendary Lambayeque king "Naymlap". The two facing prone figures seen on the handle may be depicted as "riding" or "flying" on the handle, which also refers to the myth of "Naymlap", who was thought to have flown into the sky. This vessel may also be a "ceremonial type" vessel that was used for libations, and the vessel offered here has exceptional surfaces, and is more detailed than other vessels of this type. Another analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 244. ($500.00-$700.00 estimates, $460.00 realized. See attached description/photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360699
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF) condition, weighs 4.8 grams, and is approximately 22 mm in diameter. This coin also has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer the the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of this rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1278878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern red steatite kohl vessel, that dates circa 2nd-3rd Millenium B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a complete intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This interesting piece is rectangular shaped, and is in the shape of a tower. There is a circular opening seen at the top, along with four raised corners, and there is a hollow core that runs down into the center of the vessel. This vessel is also decorated with notches and bow-drilled "recessed concentric circle" designs on all four sides. There are also nine (9) "recessed concentric circle" designs seen on each side, and some of these "recessed concentric circle" designs are more deeply drilled than others. This vessel, besides being a very attractive architectural type piece, is a "kohl vessel" which contained compacted material (grayish-black or white powder). The grayish-black material was known as "kohl", which was used to protect and heal the eyes in a desert and/or an arid enviroment. The white powder, which is sometimes found in this type of vessel, was used to coat the face and served as a sun block. There are also remains of a grayish-black "kohl" material found in the vessel offered here as well. This vessel was also usually fitted with a bronze stick that served to remove and apply the product. This piece also has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections of this piece, and has some attractive deep black colored veins that run throughout this hard red steatite stone. This type of vessel was widespread in the ancient Near East and Mesopotamia, as well as the Iranian plateau, Margiana, and Greek Bactria. However, the red steatite material seen with this vessel is scarce to rare, and was highly prized in antiquity, and there are very few recorded examples of this type made from this beautiful dark red stone. This piece is an attractive scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12955. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383260
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This intact piece is an attractive Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C., and is approximately 4.35 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a graceful bowl with a flared rim and an added ring base, and has looping strap handles that were solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece also has a reddish-tan reserve at the bottom, along with a black centered dot. The interior of the vessel also has a thick, lustrous black glaze that is also an indication that this vessel was specifically made for holding liquids such as wine. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests an Attic manufacture, and/or is the product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (See "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913.) The piece offered here is superb to mint quality with no repair and/or restoration, and is in "as found" condition, as it has numerous root marks and spotty light brown and white calcite deposits. In addition, this piece has an attractive multi-colored iridescent patina, and is a better example than what is normally seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362275
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,685.00
This extremely detailed figurine is a Greco-Roman bronze wild boar that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This cute piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.2 inches high, and is a complete example with no repair/restoration. This piece is also a solid example, as it was cast as one piece, and it also stands by itself. This piece has extremely detailed features, with scaled skin, realistic facial features, an incised and raised hair neck ridge, and a tightly curled tail. This piece also has an exceptional and even dark green patina, with some minute spotty light red highlights. This piece is very analogous in design to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, London, "A Peaceable Kingdom, The Leo Mildenberg Collection of Ancient Animals", Oct. 2004, no. 211. ($1,800.00-$2,700.00 estimates, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D., and nearly identical in size. See attached photo.) The wild boar was very important to the Greek Hellenistic culture, as it was the ancient boar hunt that defined the passage of a boy to a man. The wild boar was one of the most dangerous beasts that roamed the ancient countryside, and ancient hunting expeditions often assumed mythic proportions, such as the famous Calydonian boar hunt. A nice complete example that has a great deal of eye appeal. A custom display stand is also included, and the piece sits down into the grooves of the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Concordia Art, Las Vegas, NV., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: