Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288546
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Greek gold diadem wreath that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 13 inches long by 1.4 inches high, and is a complete example. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, and is 100% original. This piece has eight large leaves, with four on each side that meet at the front center of the piece. The eight leaves are each attached to a band with attachment tabs, and these tabs are punched through the band and are folded back on the back side of the piece. There are two hooks at each end, and they simply tied this piece together at the back of the head. The overall construction of this piece is rather simple, but this also provided for a piece that has a great deal of eye appeal, as the leaves are easily seen on the crown of the head. This piece was also likely made for a young woman or child, and could have been worn during special events or in the grave. This piece is also a type that first appeared in the Hellenistic Period, and was popular throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece has some strength, and stays in a fixed position on it's custom display stand. This piece can also easily be removed from it's custom display stand, and once removed, can also be displayed on it's own, as it solidly put together. This piece also has some light brown deposits, some minute black dotted mineral deposits seen in various sections, and some spotty minute root marking. The color of this piece also is a brilliant gold, and has a beautiful faint multi-colored iridescent patina. One of the best examples for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1249809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Attic Sessile Kantharos, that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is also classified as being of the "Saint-Valentin Class". This attractive piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is repaired from several large tight fitting fragments, and is 100% original. What makes this piece better than most examples of this type, is that there is no glaze loss, and the bright glossy glazed surface is seen with a deep black, a bright white, and a vibrant light orange color. This piece has on each side a dotted checker-pattern, a band of laurel in added white, and vertical lines seen above and below. The dotted checker-pattern is very detailed, and is designed in a rectangular box like a tesserae floor mosaic. This piece also has a black dot pattern on the bottom, and a deep black glaze is seen within the vessel. There are also some white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom surface as well. Another analogous vessel of this type and condition is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Morven Collection of Ancient Art", New York, June 2004, no. 362. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here has an exceptional glossy surface with a detailed painted design, is a better example than most pieces of this type, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1382661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek terracotta applique of a god, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide, and is a complete example that was mounted on the wall of a ceramic or a handle. On the custom Plexiglas display stand, this piece has a total height of approximately 6 inches high. The wall of the ceramic and/or handle is seen on the backside of the piece, and this piece was mold made, and then was subsequently applied to the vessel. This complete piece has no restoration and/or repair, and has some minute earthen deposits. This powerful piece is a nice applique portrait of a god who is likely a young Herakles, as he is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress, has upturned curled hair, and a young face. The portrait may also double for a young Alexander the Great, as there are many representations from antiquity of Alexander that are of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This rare Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at sacred shrines such as Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb and flawless condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1404824
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,875.00
This extremely rare Greek bronze dates to the Geometric Period, circa late 8th-7th century B.C., and is approximately 3.9 inches high. This piece is a votive bronze warrior, and was likely offered to a shrine such as Dodona or Delphi. In addition, this type is known as a "ithyphallic type" figurine, as this figurine displays a large phallus, and is a symbol of strength and fertility, along with the cult of Dionysus. This piece also has a bent lower right leg, and was intentionally bent so that the spirit of the warrior would not spiritually leave the shrine. This piece also has a single belt seen around the waist, has incised facial details, and outstretched stubby arms. The head also has an angular jaw and large almond eyes that are artistic hallmarks of the Greek "Geometric Period". This piece has a beautiful light blue patina with dark brown/green highlights, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also very analogous, and nearly identical to an example found at the Greek sacred shrine of Dodona, and is now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, Greece, no. 4905. (For a view of this piece, see the attached photo from the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, and at Wikimedia: https://commons.wikimedia.org). The piece offered here is about the same size as the piece noted above, and both pieces were cast as a single piece. The piece noted above also has three belt rings seen around the waist, and the piece offered here has a single belt ring. This belt ring may also signify the rank of the warrior, and these warriors are completely nude save for these waist belt rings. There is also a strong possibility that the Museum of Ioannina piece noted above, and the piece offered here, were both made at the same workshop. This piece is also analogous to a larger Greek Bronze Warrior that was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2014, no. 7 ($40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $43,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) The extremely rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market, as there are only a handful of recorded examples, and the majority of bronze figurines of this design are Italic in origin and date circa 625-600 B.C. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1960's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1208989
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,235.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern bronze roundel, that dates circa 1000-650 B.C. This rare piece is approximately 2.5 inches in diameter, and it has a concave design. This piece was likely attached to a cloth backing such as a garment, as there are some minute attachment holes seen on the outer flat perimeter band. Its quite possible that this piece could have made up a armored object such as a cuirass, a belt, or a quilted protective garment with several of these attached roundels. The concave design, with a protective inner core of leather or wood, would have offered some added strength. The flat outer perimeter band also has a detailed dotted pattern that runs around the piece, and another larger dotted pattern is seen just inside on the inner concave section of this piece. Centered in the middle of this concave section is a cat-like design which likely represents a lion or lioness, as it has a small upturned tail, paws, and feline ears, nose, and eyes. The stylized design of the head is very interesting, as there is an insect design seen within the head of this animal. This insect resembles a bee or an ant, as seen from the perspective of a top view and looking down. This piece may be from the Luristan, Urartian, or Marlik cultures, as the fabric and artistic style of this piece is analogous to other bronze pieces from those cultures. However, the duality of design is not often seen relative to the cultures noted above, and this piece is rare to extremely rare. This piece likely was used as a "protector type" piece, given the symbols seen on this piece, and this also makes perfect sense as a work of arms. The dark green patina of this piece is exceptional, and there is some attractive spotty light brown and reds seen within this piece. This piece has some minor losses seen on the upper outer edge which does not detract from this attractive piece, and this piece has a great deal of eye appeal. This pieces comes with a custom wooden and clear Plexiglas stand, and simply slips down into the stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402708
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 gms, and is approximately 22mm in diameter. This coin has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin features on the obverse (Obv.), a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse (Rev.) features: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The standing eagle is also a symbol of Zeus, and was a messenger of the gods. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer to the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of the rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG COP 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1409968
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare Greco-Roman bronze depicts Alexander the Great's war horse Bucephalus, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This lively piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 2.75 inches high, and is a rare type that is designed with a square base plate. This piece easily stands by itself, and has a beautiful emerald dark green patina. This piece has a very lively designed head that is seen slightly tilted to the left, along with a slight turn of the neck to the left as well. In combination, this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is also seldom depicted in subsequent Roman works of art. In addition, the mouth is slightly open, and the body appears to be prancing, as the left front leg is raised, but Bucephalus also appears to be depicted with no motion, and the horse's musculature and facial features indicate the end of "a tremendous exertion". This horse also has a main that is parted at the crest of the neck, and appears to have been cut. This is also an additional Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is also seen on the marble horse fragments now seen in the British Museum that are thought to have been attributed to the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, circa 353-350 B.C. (See "Fourth-Century Styles in Greek Sculpture" by Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway, University of Wisconsin Press, 1997, pp. 111-130, pl. 29. See attached photo.) It may be that the piece offered here was possibly modeled after these fragments and the building noted above. Bucephalus is also seen wearing a regal lion's skin, and the head of the lion is seen draped over the front of the chest. There is also a raised chevron seen between the ears that also resembles a raised horn, and this is also a regal symbol. Bucephalus meaning "ox-head", was reported to have been a massive creature with a large head, and was described as having a black coat and a large white star on his brow. He was thought to have been in the major battles of Issus and Guagamela, and finally succumbed to injuries after the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 B.C., and is thought to have been buried in Jalalpur Sharif, Punjab, Pakistan. This piece is completely intact, save for an old repair to the tail, and has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. The lively and rare piece offered here was likely owned by a wealthy individual who may have been in a horse related business, or the military. The "Cult of Bucephalus" was also very strong down into the Roman period, especially in the eastern Roman provinces. The piece offered here with these Greek Hellenistic conventions of art is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example. This piece also has a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1328301
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This piece is a superb example of an Italic bronze "Kouros" figurine, and is an early Etruscan example that dates to the Archaic Period, circa 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches high, by .72 inches wide. This complete and intact bronze is in the form of a nude standing male "Kouros", which is a Greek convention of art design that was derived from earlier Egyptian statuary, and was geometric in design, rather than realistic in form. This standing piece is also very analogous to the standing figural Greek "Kouros" and "Korai" type of statuary which was produced in the 7th-6th century B.C. This piece was cast as one solid figure, and was then hand stamped with round circles for the eyes, nipples, and navel. This piece also has earlier "Geometric Period" artistic style with squared angled shoulders and jaw, arms straight down at the sides, and a serene face which looks alive with the large round eyes. There are also incised lines on the hands and feet which define fingers and toes. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece has an analogous artistic style as the piece seen in "The Etruscans", Mario Torelli ed., Rizzoli Pub. 2000, page 591. This piece can also stand by itself, as it has extended feet which forms a solid base. This piece has a custom Plexiglas display stand as well. This scarce and superb piece has better detail that what is usually seen on pieces of this type, as it has very little wear because it was a "votive" type piece. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 174. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) Ex: New York private collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1309661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 9.8 inches in diameter by 2.25 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this beautiful vessel has an attractive bust of a young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. Her facial features also have a better artistic style than what is normally seen on Apulian pieces of this type, and one can easily see that the simple facial lines convey the look of a young woman. There is also a dotted plate seen at the front of the bust, and a white and yellow fan behind. This piece also displays a thick white stroke seen above the forehead, and a white comb above, which are hallmark attributes of the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. There is also a dark orange wave pattern, a white floral-leaf pattern, and a single red line that frames the bust of the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a lustrous black painted reserve at the bottom, along with a raised footed base. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking. This piece is also analogous to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. For the type attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter see A.D Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: