Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this complete piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This solid piece can also be easily mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece as it was done in antiquity. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304124
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is a silver Greco-European "spectacle fibula" that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1.4 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece was made from one hammered strand of silver, and was made by creating a wire spiral that begins and ends at the center of each spiral. This piece is also very solid, as the diameter of the silver strand is about 1/16 inch on the average. The area between both spirals forms a clip that likely held rolls of hair in place, so this piece served as a functional, as well as a decorative type of piece. This piece has an attractive light gray patina, along with some minute spotty dark green mineral deposits seen mostly on "Side B" of the piece. (An analogous example was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2012, no. 218, 500-600 Pound estimates.) Silver examples of this type are relatively scarce on the market, especially in the intact condition offered here. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$305.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,625.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1309661
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C., and is approximately 9.8 inches in diameter by 2.25 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this beautiful vessel has an attractive bust of a young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. Her facial features also have a better artistic style than what is normally seen on Apulian pieces of this type, and one can easily see that the simple facial lines convey the look of a young woman. There is also a dotted plate seen at the front of the bust, and a white and yellow fan behind. This piece also displays a thick white stroke seen above the forehead, and a white comb above, which are hallmark attributes of the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. There is also a dark orange wave pattern, a white floral-leaf pattern, and a single red line that frames the bust of the young woman. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", but may represent Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. This renewal of life was also connected to the departed, as this piece was a votive vessel. This piece also has a lustrous black painted reserve at the bottom, along with a raised footed base. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking. This piece is also analogous to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 201. For the type attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter see A.D Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 227, no. 1. A custom plate stand is also included with this piece. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1384480
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek bronze jewelry mold that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .3 inches thick. This complete piece was cast as one solid piece and has a flat back, a single hole for suspension seen below the rounded top, and two extended handles with mounting holes seen on each side of the main body of the piece. This piece was also likely secured with cords through the extended handles to a flat surface, and the artist was then able to apply pressure to the mold. A thin sheet of gold or silver was placed into the mold, and pressure into the mold with a tool formed half of the body of the acorn. Two halves were subsequently joined together to form the complete decorative acorn that were often strung side-by-side into a necklace. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and appears to have some minute wear from use in antiquity. The bronze mold offered here is extremely rare, and offers some insights as to how ancient jewelry was produced. This piece may also have been suspended by a cord with other molds of various sizes in a workshop. This piece also comes with a custom display stand, can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand, and is an extremely rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #12608. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is superb to mint quality "as found" condition, save for some minor glaze loss on one outer section of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Roman silver miniature eagle is extremely detailed, is a masterpiece of roman engraving, and dates circa 1st century B.C.- 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1401878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze bull's head oil lamp cover that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches long, by 1.1 inches wide from ear to ear, by .3 inches high. This piece is complete with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast into a mold and was then finished with hammered details. The head of the bull seen here has very detailed eyes, snout, and horns, and is a superb example for the type. This piece also has a very attractive dark brown patina with light green and blue highlights which are also heavier on the inside surface of the piece. This piece likely served as a cover for a bronze oil lamp, and was simply placed over the central filler hole. Roman oil lamp lids of this type are also scarce, as Roman bronze oil lamps usually had lids that were attached to the lamp with a swinging type hinge. There is also no indication that this piece was attached to a hinge as well. Overall, a nice Roman bronze with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338257
Apolonia Ancient Art
$935.00
This piece is an Egyptian necklace that is made of 84 individual beads and amulets that date circa 1070-712 B.C., Third Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 19 inches long, and has an added modern 18k gold clasp that makes this piece very wearable. The majority of the beads and amulets are mold made with a light blue glaze, and are faience type beads that have nice minute detail. The smaller beads likely represent small floral seeds, and there are two (2) closed floral amulets, three (3) grape cluster amulets, three (3) closed fist amulets, two (2) small carved white bone Horus Falcon bead amulets, and one (1) central light purple molded lapis lazuli phallic amulet that is a scarce example. These amulets are not only "protector type", but they are also "fertility type" amulets that promote fertility and the cycle of life. The ancient Egyptians always wore and offered amulets to a deity, because he or she believed that it would magically bestow a particular form of protective power. The necklace offered here is made from elements of beads and amulets that were also worn in antiquity, and/or were votive. For an explanation of all the elements and amulets seen in this attractive necklace see; "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. All of the elements and amulets are intact in superb condition, and have no repair and/or restoration. This necklace also has nice eye appeal, has detailed features, and can easily be seen from a distance. This piece also has a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
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This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398684
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This attractive and complete piece is a Roman bronze hanging lamp that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This two-part piece is approximately 4.7 inches long, by 1 inch high for the main body of the lamp; and 4 inches long, by 2 inches high for the hanging nail hook. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with dark red highlights, and is in superb "as found" condition; as the hanging chain is complete, the hanging nail hook is intact, and the attachment lanyards on the lamp are intact. This piece was also cast as one piece, and the main body of the lamp has raised round circles at the bottom base which diffused heat. This lamp also has a double spout, and the hanging nail hook allowed this lamp to be extremely portable, and there is a distinct possibility that this lamp was made for a Roman legion that was on the move. It's also important to note that the chain, the hanging nail hook, and the main body of the piece are also contiguous, as evidenced by the matching patina seen on all of these pieces. A superb and complete hanging lamp not often seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1386486
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek terracotta dates to the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3.8 inches high. This large bust is intact, and is a complete bust of a very large standing terracotta of a goddess such as Persephone, who is the Greek goddess of harvest and fertility. This esoteric bust has exceptional artistic style, as the head is slightly tilted to the left, and the head is slightly uplifted. The hair is also tied upwards into a bun above the forehead, and the face has a slight smile. This very large bust is in it's natural "as found" condition with it's natural earthen deposits, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 5 inches. For the type see "Tanagra Mythe et Archeologie", Louve, Paris, 2004, fig. 107. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1264405
Apolonia Ancient Art
$485.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman bronze key that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches long, by .75 inches in diameter for the ring seen at the terminal end. This piece has a beautiful light blue to green patina with some spotty red highlights. This piece is in better condition than most examples, and is a mint quality piece with well defined groves seen at the end. This piece may have fit a personal strong box, or possibly a small door. This type of key is also published in "Handwerk und Berfude in der Romischen Stadt', by Rieche & Schalles, Cologne, 1994, pp. 46-47. This nice piece is a complete example of a Roman bronze key that was individually owned by a Roman with some means. This piece also hangs from a custom stand, and can easily be worn today in a necklace. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: