Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1379967
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This powerful looking piece is an Egyptian faience amulet torso of Pataikos that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide from shoulder to shoulder. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god "Pataikos", and was ceremoniously broken with the removal of the head and legs. This piece was worn as a "protector" type amulet, as the missing head had a suspension hoop attached at the back. "Pataikos" was a popular naked dwarf god who strangled snakes, and protected craftsman, children, and everyday working people. The muscular torso seen here has a fine dark green glaze, and very detailed features. The powerful and muscular torso seen here appears to be ready to act as a strong "protector" god, hence the muscular design. This piece is also in superb condition, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. (An example of the same size, but not having a large muscular torso, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXIX, 2018, no. 175 for $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Contemporary item #821957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
La Collezione Archeologica Del Banco Di Sicilia is a boxed two volume set that was printed in 1992 by Edizioni Guida Pub. in Palermo, Italy. This beautiful two volume set is virtually unobtainable in the US, and is a superb corpus of ancient Greek ceramics that were produced in Magna Graecia (Southern Italy). If you are a collector of ancient Greek ceramics, this book is an excellent reference, as there are 648 pieces listed with B&W photos in Vol.1, and Vol.2 has line drawings, detailed descriptions, maps, and lavish color photos of the pieces listed in Vol. 1. Vol.1 is organized with sections such as: Vasi Preistorici, Terrecotte, Ceramica Figurata, Corinthian, Attica, Apulia, Siceliota, and Gnathian. Vol. 2 also groups these pieces into double page color fold outs, with catagories such as Fantastic Animals, Female Divinities, Nike Divinities, War Scenes, and Sport Scenes. This edition was printed as a limited edition and has not been re-printed, and is one of the most comprehensive references for ancient Greek ceramics outside the works produced by A.D. Trendall. All of the text is in Italian, and all the pieces have sizes listed, museum inventory numbers, and dates. The condition of this boxed two volume set is mint, save for some wear on the bottom side of the outer box. This is a very valuable reference for the collector, and one that has many pieces listed.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1359591
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This exceptional piece is a Greek silver fibula that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2.2 inches long, by 1.6 inches wide. This piece also has a beautiful light gray patina, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This finely detailed piece is a solid example, and was made in sections, and was also designed with an acanthus design seen at one terminal end. The other terminal end has two raised knobs with a hoop between, and this raised hoop likely held a leather tie so that this fibula would not have been lost by the wearer. This piece was expensive in antiquity, and was worn only by a wealthy individual. This piece also displays five "paddle wheel" decorative elements, and each of these decorative elements have six raised knobs. The overall design of this attractive piece is very intricate, which also lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This type of piece was also used in place of a button to fasten the sleeves of the Greek chiton. (For the type and use see: "Greek Jewellery, 6,000 Years of Tradition", 1997, Athens, no. 78.) Another near identical example is also seen in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Inventory no. 52.36. The exceptional piece offered here is one of the finest recorded examples, and is complete, save for the missing ultra-thin attachment pin. This piece is also attached to a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1341167
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This superb Olmec seated figurine dates to the Intermediate Olmec Period, circa 900-600 B.C., and is approximately 3.6 inches high, by 1.9 inches wide, by 1.75 inches deep. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and was carved from a light to dark green serpentine stone. This piece also has some spotty light black to dark green dotted inclusions seen within the stone, and a light brown patina seen in the deep recesses of the figurine. There is also some spotty minute root marking, and some faint traces of red cinnabar. This piece likely depicts a shaman seen in the seated position, and it is a complete carved figure that is finished in the round. This attractive piece also sits upright without falling over, as this piece also has a flat to slightly outward curved underside that provides a solid base. The arms and hands are seen resting on the knees of the crossed legs, and the oval shaped head is seen slightly tilted to the left. The entire body appears to be nude, as are most Olmec figurines of this type, and the facial expression also features the typical downward turned thick lips and horizontal deep carved eyes. The mouth design with the thick lips that are downturned, is also known as the "Olmec jaguar mouth", and is the prominent design feature of the piece offered here. The "jaguar mouth" seen on this piece is also thrust forward towards the viewer, and was an intentional design of the artist, and one can easily see this design feature as one looks at this figurine from the side in profile. The slight tilt of the head also accentuates the design of the face, and gives this piece a great deal of expression. The wide nose has two small bow drilled holes for the nostrils, and in addition, there are two bow drilled holes seen at each end of each eye. The overall face design is one that is seen as a "transformation" type face, from human to jaguar, or vice-versa. The seated and/or kneeling pose of this figurine is also known as the "transformation shaman pose", which is associated with Olmec figurines that are thought to depict a shaman in various stages of transformation from human to jaguar, and vice-versa. (See "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", by F. Kent Reilly III, Princeton University, Abrams Pub., 1995, pp. 27-45.) The superb Olmec figurine offered here is an excellent example of Olmec "transformational" type art, and is seldom offered on the market in this condition. This piece also has an extensive authentication examination report from Stoetzer, Inc., Miami, FL., report #010514.1, dated 02/09/2014; and was also authenticated by Robert Sonin, New York, c/o Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Edmund Budde Collection, circa 1950's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the authentication examination report noted above.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1375947
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These pieces are nineteen (19) Egyptian faience glazed amulets that are from the Amarna-Period, Late New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, circa 1350 B.C., and also date to the reign of Akhenaten and Tutankhamun. These interesting and attractive pieces range in size from approximately .9 to .25 inches high, and are all intact, save one plaque amulet that has a chip on one side. Nine (9) of the amulets have a minute suspension hoop at the top, and were likely strung together on a necklace or interwoven into a garment. The remaining amulets were likely interwoven and/or wrapped into a garment, and may have also been interwoven into the wrappings of a mummy, as this was likely the case for all of the amulets offered here. The amulets vary in type, glaze color, and size which makes them a very interesting study group. A lotus flower, a palmette, a Wedjat-eye, a seated Sekhmet, and a Hes-Vase represent some of the examples offered here. Many of these amulet types are seen in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. The mold made amulets offered here also range in color from a bright blue glaze to a dark purple-blue color. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : References : Fine Art : Contemporary item #1010631
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This "Pre-Columbian Art of Mexico and Central America" book by Hasso von Winning is in mint condition, and is a "must have" reference book for collectors, museum curators, and art history students of Pre-Columbian art from Mexico and central America. This crisp, mint first edition is lavishly illustrated with superb examples from all the primary cultures of the entire Central American and Mexican region. This book is organized first by geographic area, and within that area, the primary cultural groups are classified in chronological order. There is a brief overview of the archaeology of each primary geographical area, and then a discussion of the highlights of the artifacts in that area all by chronological order. Each object is photographed in the book, many in beautiful color, and by professional art photographers. In addition, each object is accurately described with its date and dimension. Many of the objects were published for the first time in this book, and many of the objects are from private collections from around the world. It is important to note that this book was published prior to the US and UNESCO patrimony regulations. This book is also utilized by the major auction houses such as Sotheby's, Christies, and Bonhams as a primary reference for objects represented at auction. This book is also the companion book for "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner. The book offered here was published in January 1968 by Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 388 pages with text, 595 illustrations, 175 photos in full color and many are mounted. Hardbound with dust jacket, including the clear protective cover for the dust jacket. ISBN: 0810904233.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
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This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is has a Lambayeque Valley, Peru, type of design, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has silver with added copper metal plate. This piece also has a thin applied coat of original spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #1242679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This scarce piece is a Chimu/Inka culture silver mask that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This piece is approximately 8 inches wide by 6.9 inches high by 1 inch deep. This appealing designed piece is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the lower nose section, and is complete with no restoration/repair. This piece has a nice dark gray patina with some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and thick dark/light brown mineral deposits are seen on the back side of this piece. This piece was also hand beaten from a single silver sheet, and there are punched cheek, nose, and mouth details. There are also two punched horizontal shaped eye holes, and two holes on each side which were used to tie this powerfully primitive designed piece to a textile shrouded mummy bundle. This piece also has very little bend, and also served as a solid cover for the mummy bundle. The primitive design of this piece may also have been designed to represent the departed in the spirit world, and also served to protect the mummy. This piece is also the normal size for a piece of this type, and another scarce piece of this type classified as Chimu culture is seen in "Peru, Durch Die Jahrtausende", Verlag Aurel Bongers KG, Recklinghausen 1984, Austria, Kat.-Nr. 11.67, Linden-Museum, Stuttgart, Museum no. M 31 059. (The Stuttgart example is approximately 8 inches high and has analogous punched out eye holes, and punched nose and facial details. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a powerfully primitive designed facial image that defines the essence of Pre-Columbian Andean art. This striking piece also comes with a custom shadow box, and can easily be removed, as it is mounted within with removable plastic tabs. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 149, Lot 371, Zurich, circa 1990. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1404947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This intact piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.2 inches high. This piece has an attractive dark green patina, and some spotty light mineral deposits. This piece was cast as one solid piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods are seen wearing the winged cap known as a "petasus". The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. The figurine seen here is also seen holding a money bag in his extended right hand, and this was to offer the owner of this piece fortune in commerce. This piece also has a square built-in base, and this piece stands by itself. The piece offered here is very simple in design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's also very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a temple or shrine. This piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1399734
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extra large and impressive piece is a Mayan brownware ceremonial tripod vessel that dates to the Early Classic Period, circa 450-650 A.D., and is approximately 13 inches in diameter, by 9 inches high. This impressive piece is a thick walled light to dark brown terracotta ceramic, that has three "slab type" legs attached to the flat base. This tripod bowl vessel is also somewhat heavy, and the three attached "slab type" legs have identical decorative architectural elements molded onto the outer surface of each leg. There are also three separate impressed panels with decorative elements that are seen on the outer surface of the bowl, and these panels are also identical, as they were made with a stamp that was rolled onto the outer surface of the bowl. These decorative elements show a two-part scene that is divided with a column, and to the right of the column, there is an elaborately attired standing figure with outstretched arms holding implements. The left side of the column shows a "central glyph medallion" flanked by winged motifs and stylized birds seen in profile. The "central glyph medallion" has three dots seen in the center, and this resembles the Mayan glyph meaning "moon". This "central glyph medallion" also appears to be attached to a raised stela that is also seen with three dots at the top. The stylized birds seen in profile at each side of the "central glyph medallion" are also of a raptor type with a hooked beak, and may represent either an eagle of a vulture which were both sacred to the Maya. There is also a stylized wavy band seen below. This type of heavy tripod bowl has strong Teotihuacan influence, and is a type of vessel that the Mayan produced in the Early Classic Period. This piece was often used in ceremony, and likely held an offering such as an agricultural commodity, or even a sacrificial head. A thick black glaze was also added at the bottom of this bowl in order to control a liquid, and this is the only glaze seen on this piece. The number "three" is seen multiple times on this piece with the three separate panels, the three "slab type" legs, the three dots seen within the "central glyph medallion", and the three dots seen at the top of the raised stela; and seen in combination, may have some other hidden ceremonial meaning. This impressive Mayan piece is complete, is 100% original, and has been repaired from several large fragments, as most "large scale" Mayan ceramics of this type have. There is also some minute root marking seen on the inside bottom of the bowl and some spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of the entire piece. An impressive "large scale" ceremonial type vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Palm Beach Atlantic College, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May, 1989, no. 377. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1407413
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience offering cup with the cartouche of Merenptah dates to the New Kingdom Period, circa 1213-1203 B.C., and is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 1.7 inches in diameter at the rim. This example is in flawless mint quality condition, and has an attractive light blue/green faience glaze, both on the inside and outside surfaces. There are also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and the faience glaze is rather even over the entire piece. In addition, there is a black glazed cartouche of the pharaoh Merenptah, and above, a hieroglyphic inscription meaning "Lord of the Lands". On the inside of this large offering cup, there are the preserved remnants of a calcified light brown material that is in the bottom half inch of the cup. This esoteric piece also has a gracefully designed flared upper lip, and a matching flared bottom base ring. The bottom of this piece is flat, and this piece easily stands upright. There is also an old inventory number "7B", seen inscribed on the flat bottom as well. The pharaoh Merenptah was the son of Ramses II, and was 60 years of age at his accession in about 1213 B.C. He was known for defeating a large force of invaders known as the "Sea Peoples", who are thought to have destroyed much of the Mycenaean palaces and cities. Egypt was one of the few great civilizations that survived through those turbulent times, and Merenptah, and his father Ramses II, are credited with saving Egypt. The rare offering cup offered here is an excellent example from the period, and clearly displays the name of the pharaoh. (Offering cups attributed to the pharaoh Merenptah are rare, and one of the few examples was offered by Royal-Athena Galleries, "Art of the Ancient World", 2015, no. 225. Approximately 1.6 inches high. $6,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: Anthony Drexel collection, Philadelphia, circa 1895-1970's. Ex: Dr. Bensen Harer Jr. collection, Seattle, circa 1970's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1376342
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This rare piece is a Greek attic black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.4 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This attractive piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and is in superb to flawless condition, save for some minor glaze loss on the upper spout section. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. There is also an impressed "egg-and-dart" motif design seen at the edge of the upper shoulder, and an effigy bull's head that is built into the spout design, which also has a horn on each side of the handle. In addition, this piece has a flat bottom with a collector tag reading "no. 34". This piece also has a lustrous black glaze with dark brown burnishing seen in sections of the vessel, with an unglazed reserve at the bottom of the vessel. This type of vessel was also created in precious metals, and although there is the possibility that this piece was created for everyday use, it may also have been created solely as a "votive" type piece. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. see attached photo.) For the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: