Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374395
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This complete and intact piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Demeter that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, and is an intact and complete example that has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and was designed with a square base and a circular vent hole seen at the back. This nice piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece represents Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton, along with a himation that is draped over her shoulders. She is also seen holding a piglet to her chest with both hands, and is standing with her left knee slightly forward. She has a slight smile, and has a very serene overall look, as she is seen simply standing and facing the viewer. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and also depicts the animal offering (piglet) that was offered in a religious ceremony to a shrine or a temple. This piece by itself may also have served as a votive offering substitute as well. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2000. no. 84 for another analogous example of this type.) The piece offered here is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also attached to a custom wooden display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369191
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay child and crib textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 10.25 inches long, by 4.25 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. This piece is a young child seen lying within an elongated crib that is tightly wrapped with a white colored textile. The child is also tightly attached to the crib, and is seen wearing a multi-colored garment. The young child has long dark brown hair tied at the back of the head into a loose bun, and cascades over the side of the crib. The nose, eyes, and mouth are made from woven textiles, and appears to be very serene little girl. The short red woven hands are tightly woven, and resemble a "stick figure" with extended fingers and toes. The piece is also made with numerous textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and these Chancay textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, as they promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. This piece also has outer garments that were custom made for this child figure, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. One of the best recorded examples of this type, as it is mint quality, and complete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
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This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360510
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This nice Egyptian swivel ring dates to the Second Intermediate Period, circa 1650-1549 B.C., and is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter and was made for an adult male. This piece is in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. The stone has no cracks or chips, and the overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality. This piece has an attractive green-black steatite stone that swivels around a wire that runs through the piece. This piece has a clever design, in that the wire that runs through the extremely dense steatite stone, is wrapped around a bronze hoop at each end of the stone. The overall design of the ring is very esoteric, and the ring with the raised steatite stone is very noticeable on one's finger. The bronze hoop also has a pleasing dark brown-green patina with some minute red highlights. The attractive green-black steatite stone was highly polished in antiquity, and it still retains a great deal of it's brilliant luster. The stone also has a thin multi-colored iridescence that is seen on both the upper rounded side, and the flat bottom side. This ring is durable enough that it can easily be worn today, and the stone also swivels freely around the inner wire. A nice Egyptian ring that is a high quality example. A black ring display stand is also included. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private new York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce extremely large piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact, and is in mint condition with no repair/restoration. The surface of this exceptional piece also has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina, along with a rich glossy black glaze, and in addition, there is some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel that features a vibrant facing Silenus head that was mold made, and has very high relief, as it is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type usually do not have this added design feature. This large piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. An intact and scarce x-large vessel that is seldom seen the market, and is one of the best recorded examples for he type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1260877
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This scarce piece is a Mayan ceramic that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 4.5 inches high, and is in superb intact condition with only a few minute abrasions. This piece also has an attractive orange and light brown polychrome glaze, with some heavy and spotty black mineral deposits. This interesting vessel is in the form of a sitting rabbit, and has all four legs tucked under the body. There is also a single rattle that is built into the animated hollow head, and rattles of this type are normally seen in the rounded hollow legs of select Mayan tripod vessels. This appealing vessel is designed to sit horizontally as a rabbit would be at rest, and also upright, as if the rabbit is raised up on it's hind legs. In addition, there are three suspension holes, one under each front leg, and one that runs through the head. This allowed one to control a liquid that could then be poured from the raised hole that is seen on the upper back of the rabbit. This piece also has a black Mayan mat symbol which is painted on the belly of the rabbit. The rabbit, for the Maya, was a deity associated with scribal or artistic roles, and was the patron god of the Mayan scribe. According to Michael Coe in "The Art of the Maya Scribe", Abrams Pub., New York, 1998, p. 110: "The much illustrated little Rabbit God writing a codex on the Princeton Vase makes only one showing as a scribe in the art of the classic Maya. He must be the same rabbit that the Maya saw on the face of the moon, and is iconographically linked with the Moon Goddess, who often is depicted holding him in her arms." The piece offered here may represent a scribe as a rabbit, but more likely it represents the "Rabbit God" himself, who also doubles as the patron god of the Mayan scribes. This vessel may also have been a "paint pot" for a Mayan scribe and/or it may also have been a votive vessel for an important individual such as a Mayan scribe. The artistic style of the painted black Mayan mat seen on this piece, is also analogous to the painted mats seen on "Copador" type vessels. The name "Copador" is a contraction of Copan and El Salvador, and refers to the zone of distribution for this type of vessel. This piece may also refer to the 13th ruler of Copan, "18 Rabbit", who acceded to the throne circa 695 A.D., and ruled for 43 years. Under his rule in Copan, Copan's population was growing as never before, and the "Copador" polychrome ware was being manufactured and distributed over a wide area in the Mayan world. This energetic ruler erected many monuments, including one of the largest ballcourts (Ballcourt A-III), which was second only to the Great Court at Chichen Itza. Linda Schele also felt that this ruler was also the greatest single patron of the arts in Copan's history, based on the number of works and the high-relief style of carving. (See "Scribes, Warriors, and Kings", by William Fash, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1991, p. 125.) Hence, it's quite possible that the vessel offered here also referred to this ruler of Copan, in addition to representing the "Rabbit God" of the Mayan scribes. This piece is a rare intact Mayan vessel designed in animal form, and full bodied Mayan "animal form" type ceramics are seldom seen on the market. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1031929
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This mint quality piece is a Greek pyxis vessel that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.2 inches high by 4.25 inches in diameter, and is made of two sections, with a top section that sits on top of the bottom half. This rare Greek ceramic also has inner and outer walls that are very thin, as this piece was fired at a high temperature. Consequently, this ceramic is very durable and the thin walls are very strong, and this suits this piece very well as it was designed to hold precious cosmetics and/or items such as jewelry. This piece was likely used by a woman of some means, as it was an expensive piece in antiquity, and it may have also been used as a votive grave offering in order to be used in the afterlife as well. This piece is analogous to many "Attic" type examples, and is known as a "West Slope" type, as this type of ceramic was found on the west side of the Parthenon in Athens. This type of pyxis can also be seen in several Greek museums, including the Pella Museum in Greece. The piece offered here has a very attractive yellow ivy leaf and white berry band, which is a hallmark design of the Athenian ceramic industry, and many of these pieces were made for export. There are also two white decorative circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and a mold pressed roundel medallion that is seen at the top center of the upper lid section. Within this mold pressed medallion, are two standing figures of two lovers embracing, and a standing figure of Eros looking on. (A similar scene is seen on a Canosan terracotta pyxis, circa 3rd century B.C., which is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1987, no.276. See attached photo.) The intact piece offered here has no minute cracks, has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking, and is in mint "as found" condition. This vessel also has very vibrant colors, has great eye appeal, and is a rare example. Ex: Ulla Lindner collection, Switzerland. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This attractive piece is a silver bowl that is Greco-Thracian, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 9.1 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece is intact, and is a complete example that has a nice dark gray patina with some spotty dark black deposits. In addition, there is some minute root marking and an attractive multi-colored iridescence that can be seen on various sections of the piece. This piece has a hand beaten "floral pattern" seen on the outer side, and the negative image of this design can also be seen on the inside inner surface. The "floral pattern" has a circular roundel center, and the tips of the individual pedals have semi-circular curves that were each hand stamped with a punch. This piece also has a rolled edge that folds towards the inside, and was heat sealed. There is also an attached single silver "ring handle" that is seen on one side near the top rim of the vessel. This single silver "ring handle" has a round attachment plate that has a decorative stamped semi-circular pattern as well. The silver ring itself is very durable, and is very thick which is a strong indicator that this piece was meant to have been hung, and may have been hung and used in a private home, on a wagon, or a horse. The ancient Thracians and Scythians valued vessels made from precious metals, and were also a mobile culture. This piece may have been produced in one of the Greek Thracian coastal cities, and was sold or traded to the interior, but the artistic style of this piece points to the region that runs around the eastern and northern coasts of the Black Sea. ( A silver bottle with an analogous floral pedal design and construction technique is seen in "Scythian Art" by Georges Charriere, Alpine Fine Arts Pub., 1979, no. 349. This silver bottle is attributed to the 4th century B.C., and is from modern day southern Ukraine. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare example, and large silver vessels of this type are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Michael Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1237476
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,625.00
This animated piece is a squatting figurine that is from the Nazca-Wari culture, circa Middle Horizon, 600-700 A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 5 inches high, and has a flat bottom base. This figurine likely represents a squatting male who is seen holding a ball upwards with his right hand, and his left hand is also raised to his left ear lobe which appears to be bleeding. This blood is also seen running down his left arm, and his facial expression is very animated with his crooked mouth. This crooked mouth may also be a representation from his injury to the left side of his head, which also may represent a stroke and/or a cranial injury. The figurine is also seen wearing a cloak with geometric patterns, and it may be that the person depicted here may also have been a ballplayer. The raising of the ball in his right hand may also be a sign of victory in the ancient Mesoamerican ballgame, and this may depict the point of victory in the game. This piece is also a ceremonial whistle vessel, and makes a high pitched noise when one blows into the bottom opening seen at the back side of this piece. There is also an opening for the whistle seen at the back side, and also two openings for the missing stirrup spout. This piece may also have been ceremoniously broken when it was buried, with the stirrup spout discarded, and perhaps this was linked to the fact that this piece may have portrayed an actual person. This piece was also collected by Dr. Ernst J. Fischer who collected Pre-Columbian ceramics that displayed medical related diseases and/or conditions. The condition of this piece is also superb to mint quality, and is intact save for the missing stirrup handle. The white, gray, light red, and black colors are very vibrant, and have a high degree of eye appeal. This piece was also one of the favorite pieces of Dr. Fischer, and is one of the rare examples of Andean Pre-Columbian art that likely displays a medical condition such as an injury and/or stroke of an individual. In addition, the injury depicted here may have been self inflicted and/or initiated to relieve the condition of stroke, but it is more likely that this injury was the result of playing in the ballgame. It is also interesting to note that the face of this individual is divided into two parts, with one half of the face depicted in light red, and the other half, in light gray. This piece is also a rare medical related type of ceramic, and is seldom seen on the market. An analogous piece from this culture was offered at Sotheby's African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 2014, no. 203. (See attached photo. This complete open-topped vessel is approximately 5.5 inches high, and has analogous colors/design relative to the tunic and bilaterally colored face. $10,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates, $68,750.00 realized.) Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1989, no. 337. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek coin is a Superb grade (EF+/EF), Achaian League silver triobol/hemidrachm, that dates circa 196-146 B.C. This superbly graded piece is well centered, is approximately 18 mm wide, and weighs 2.49 grams. This coin shows the bearded bust of Zeus facing right (Obv.) within a dotted border, and the Achaian League monogram (Rev.) within a wreath, with a club of Herakles above, and minute lettering (IY) seen to the left. This coin has exceptional artistic style, as the bust of Zeus has very fine detail with realistic features. This coin may also have been minted in Argos, which was one of the many cities that comprised the Achaian league in the northern and central Peloponnese. The League was also the foremost state in Greece after the eclipse of Macedonian power, and in 146 B.C., the League declared war on Rome, which resulted in the complete destruction of the League and the sack of Corinth, it's chief city. The coin offered here is rare in this grade, as most examples are Very Fine (VF) in condition. Ex: Frank Kovaks collection, San Francisco, CA., circa 1980's. References: Sear 2984. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1040039
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek pitcher that dates to the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high by 8.5 inches in diameter. This attractive piece is a light gray terracotta, and is intact with no noticeable chips and/or abrasions which are usually associated with ceramics of this type. This attractive piece also has nice light to dark brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. There is a single strap handle and trefoil mouth which allowed water and/or wine to be poured in a controlled manner. This piece also sits on a ring base that stabilizes this vessel a great deal, and together with the trefoil spout, are design innovations that represent a huge leap in ancient Greek ceramic design/production. This piece is scarce in this size and flawless condition, and is a very attractive early Greek light gray ceramic. Another analogous example nearly the same size is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1991, no.245. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1352271
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare ceramic is a Moche culture piece that dates to the Moche Period IV, circa 400-600 A.D. This erotic piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7.8 inches wide, and is in intact mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece also has superb surfaces with some attractive spotty dark black deposits, and some dark brown burnishing. This piece is a Moche "stirrup type" vessel, and has a dark red spout, along with two attached figures that is a seated woman wearing a dark orange/brown hooded cloak, and necklace; and a seated spirit figurine that is also seen wearing a cream colored cloak, ear flares, and a decorative hat with a tie that runs under the chin. The decorative hat also has some dark red "line design" features, and is of the type depicted on Moche "portrait type" vessels. The seated woman appears to be expressionless, and has one hand on her abdomen, and the other arm is seen grasping the back of the seated spirit figure. The seated spirit figure also has one arm behind the back of the seated woman, and the other hand is tucked under the cloak of the seated woman and appears to be engaged in the act of masturbating the woman's genital organs. The woman also appears to have an open eyed serene, but transfixed expression. The spirit figure also has a wide smile with his tongue extended out, and in addition to the narrowing almond eyes, these facial features convey a very powerful and licentious expression. The facial expressions of both figures seen on this piece, together portray an erotic image that is so well executed, one could easily label this piece a masterpiece of Moche erotic and pre-Columbian art. The face of this spiritual being is also humanoid, as the extended lower jaw and mouth have primate features. This piece truly conveys Moche erotic art at it's height, and in the Moche mind, the erotic composition of this vessel may have simply referred to the human nature of reproduction and the joy of sex, which in their mind, was a gift from their gods. The exceptional piece offered here is extremely rare, and the only other known recorded example of this type is seen in the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, Peru. (This Museo Larco Museum piece is also published in "Checan: Essays on Erotic Elements in Peruvian Art", by Rafael Larco Hoyle, Nagel Pub., 1965, p. 121. This piece was also likely produced from the same molds as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another reason why Moche erotic vessels of this type are extremely rare, is that the Spanish colonizers who uncovered Moche erotic vessels regarded these pieces as manifestations of something sinful. The Spanish were scandalized by the ceramic's graphic detailing of sex between humans, skeletons, animals, and Moche anthropomorphic deities; and according to Northwestern professor of Anthropology and Sexuality Studies Mary Weismantel: "Moche sex pottery is the largest and most graphic and explicit of all pre-Columbian cultures." The colonial Spanish were shaken to their Catholic core, and over the years, they smashed numerous and rare examples of Moche erotic pottery to bits, and even criminalized the ownership of such pottery, as these Moche erotic ceramics often depicted premarital and non-reproductive sex acts. Even today, the erotic collection of Moche pottery seen at the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, is kept in a secluded separate room. A few years ago they were kept under lock and key at the bottom of the Museum of Archaeology, reserved for only the most educated of eyes; those of social scientists and scholors, and for the rest of the population, the erotic pottery was deemed far too provocative. It's also interesting to note that this piece shows no nudity relative to both of the figures seen on this powerful piece, as they are both fully clothed, but yet, it is the provocative nature of this piece that truly defines this piece as a masterpiece of pre-Columbian art. This extremely rare piece also has a TL Authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 03250811. Ex: Dr. Gottfried Freiherr von Marienfels collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document noted above, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373047
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce Roman bronze lamp dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long, by 1.1 inches high. This piece is complete, has no breaks and/or chips, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two openings, one in the top center for filling oil, and the other at the end of the vessel that would hold the wick. The other end of the vessel has an attachment hoop for a chain, or a cord, and could have been hung as a votive offering pendant. This piece also has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself. This piece not only was likely made as a votive offering, but it was also likely functional as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with dark red highlights, and has some heavy dark brown mineral deposits on the inside of the vessel. This piece comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,875.00
These two rare and superb carved wooden panels are French, and date to the late Gothic period, circa 1590-1680 A.D. These pieces are a matching pair, although they have slight differences. Both of these carved panels are approximately 7.8 inches wide by 17.75 inches high, and are mounted in frames that are approximately 11.75 inches wide by 28 inches high. These outer frames date circa 1800-1850, and were the mounting for the inner carved panels. The two panels offered here, along with several additional panels, are also thought to have been originally set into a private manor house in Normandy. The bulk of these panels were sold at auction in San Francisco, CA., by Butterfield & Butterfield Co. in June 1996. Many of these panels, which were religious in nature, were identified as being produced by artisans who were employed in the area of Coutances, France, where the massive 13th century Gothic cathedral of Notre Dame was built. The panels seen here were finely carved and have great detail, and the condition of both panels offered here is exceptional. These two panels each display two caryatids that are seen back to back, and are carved in high relief. The caryatids were known in antiquity as the priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, and were often seen as a draped female figure that supported an entablature. The figures seen on these two panels are part lion, with the lion's paw feet, part bird, with the detailed feathered wings, and part woman, with the female breasts and faces. The raised hair comb and luxuriant wavy hair is very detailed as well, and is an excellent mark that the artist that carved these pieces was very skilled. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1930's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: