Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1385777
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This complete piece is a Roman bronze oil lamp cover in the form of a facing Medusa head, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches in diameter, by .28 inches high in relief. This piece was cast as one solid piece, and has a concave back side and the front side has the facing head of Medusa with long flowing hair. The face is extremely rounded with no facial expression, and has a cloak tie seen below the chin. In addition, there is an indented hole at the top with a bar which served as an opening for a swivel attachment. This piece covered a hole in a bronze oil lamp, and moved up and down over the hole. This piece has a lovely dark green patina, and has very sharp detail, especially with the eyes that have raised hollow pupils that are very noticeable. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a large example for the type. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and also can be worn as a pendant. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278504
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Roman iron javelin head that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, and is a complete example. This piece has a barbed "spiked tang" head at the end, and a rounded lead weight attached to the shaft about 3.5 inches from the end of this formable weapon. This piece has an exceptional dark brown patina, is in superb condition, and is preserved with a wax sealant which has preserved the iron shaft. There are also some spotty dark brown and white calcite mineral deposits seen mostly on the lead weight. This weapon was also known as a "hasta plumbata", meaning "leaded spear", or as referred to by the ancient source Vegetius, as a "martiobarbalus", meaning "Mars-barb". (See Vegetius, "Epitoma Rei Militaris", translated by N.P. Milner, Liverpool University Press, 1993.) Another ancient source, the "De Rebus Bellicus", M.W.C. Hassall and R.T. Ireland (eds), 1979, Oxford, describes the "plumbata Mamillata", meaning "breasted javelin", as a javelin with a lead weight and a pointed iron head, with flights attached to the opposite end of the shaft. The epithet 'breasted' likely refers to the bulbous lead weight. This lead weight was also molded onto and around the iron shaft, and was solidly attached to the shaft. This type of weapon is rare, as only a few examples have been recovered from the British Isles, notably Wroxeter; and even fewer examples have been found in Germany, notably Augst and Castell Weissenberg, and Lorch, Austria. However, the ancient source Vegetius, (1.17), does state that two Illyrican legions were renamed "Martiobarbuli Ioviani" and "Martiobarbuli Herculiani" by the joint emperors Diocletian and Maximianus because of their proficiency with this weapon. He further states that five "plumbatae" were carried by a soldier in the concavity of his shield, and they were thrown at first charge, or used to defend with the reserves and could penetrate the body or foot of the assailant. This weapon was also thought to easily penetrate shields because of the lead weight, and could be thrown at great distance. Vegetius, (1.17), further states that soldiers using the "plumbata" take the place of archers, "for they wound both the men and the horses of the enemy before they come within reach of the common missle weapons". This weapon was truly an innovation in Roman battle tactics, and is a weapon that is seldom seen on the market today, as it was made from iron which easily deteriorates in mineralized soils. Another rare piece of this type is seen in "The Late Roman Army" by Pat Southern and Karen Dixon, Yale University Press, 1996, p. 114, Fig. 46. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1384803
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality and beautiful Roman glass flask dates circa 4th century A.D., and is approximately 5.4 inches high. This piece is made from a pale blue-green glass, with a spherical body, concave base, and an extended neck that widens up to the rim. There is also an attractive trailing decoration that spirals around a third of the neck, and has developed a striking iridescence. This trailing neck thread decoration was created to provide a "grip" on the neck, and perhaps doubled as a "stopper" for a wax seal around the top opening of the vessel. This piece also has sections of a multi-iridescent patina with hues of peach, lavender, blue, and green. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal. (For the type see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, no. 403. Classified as: "Galilee Fabric".) Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1389309
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This scarce piece is an Etruscan Black Ware bucchero vessel stand that dates to the mid 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches in diameter at the top rim, and is 2.8 inches high. This interesting ceramic also has a deep lustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, and is known as a "bucchero" type ceramic. This piece has an indented round depression seen at the top, and this likely held a glass vessel, or a vessel such as an aryballos with a rounded bottom. This piece also has a raised stem on a round flat base, and the entire piece is very durable, as it is thick-walled. This vessel also has an old inventory tag attached to the bottom showing the "No. 38", and "Orvieto", which was one of the major Etruscan cities from antiquity. This piece is intact, and has exceptional surfaces with some minute root marking and spotty white mineral deposits. A scarce type vessel not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388453
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta bust that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high. This large bust is intact, save a small edge chip around the vent hole hole rim seen at the back of the head, and is a terracotta that likely represents a goddess such as Demeter. This goddess is also seen wearing an elaborate and thick diadem, and has a very serene face. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some spotty earthen and mineral deposits. This piece is a pleasing example for the type, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 4.7 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This pleasing piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C., and is approximately .75 inches high. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, who was a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsman. This piece had a suspension hoop at the backside, and was worn as a "protector" type amulet. The piece offered here has a thick dark green glaze, and has a detailed face with a serene smile. Ptah is also seen wearing a skull cap, although he appears to be bald. This superb conditioned bust is complete, save for the missing left ear, and has a realistic and better facial expression that most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369191
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay child and crib textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 10.25 inches long, by 4.25 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. This piece is a young child seen lying within an elongated crib that is tightly wrapped with a white colored textile. The child is also tightly attached to the crib, and is seen wearing a multi-colored garment. The young child has long dark brown hair tied at the back of the head into a loose bun, and cascades over the side of the crib. The nose, eyes, and mouth are made from woven textiles, and appears to be very serene little girl. The short red woven hands are tightly woven, and resemble a "stick figure" with extended fingers and toes. The piece is also made with numerous textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and these Chancay textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, as they promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. This piece also has outer garments that were custom made for this child figure, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. One of the best recorded examples of this type, as it is mint quality, and complete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide rim seen on this vessel allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid, and served as a palette for the liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1367435
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This lovely Aztec/Mixtec tripod dates to the Late Postclassic Period, circa 1000-1450 A.D., and is approximately 4.2 inches high, with a diameter at the rim of 5.5 inches. This piece is intact, with no noticeable repair/restoration, and has a light polychrome slip in black, cream, and light red colors. This piece is a tripod bowl with flat plank extended legs that also extend past the outer diameter of the bowl, and because this design, this piece is very stable sitting on a flat surface. This piece also has an attractive black and red "line-designed" geometric pattern that runs around the outer edge of the bowl, and are likely spiritual in nature. In addition, there are raised "line-designed" symbols seen on the inner surface of the bowl, and these symbols are likely sacred as well. These symbols are also completely intact, and this is rare for vessels such as this, as the raised lines are often broken and have missing sections. This piece was also produced by the Mixteca people for the Aztec nobility who preferred these vessels for their food service vessels. It's also unknown whether these vessels were used to grind or abrade a foodstuff or other organic substance, or weather they served a solely ritual, service function. An interesting intact vessel that is becoming scarce in today's market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328068
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive Greek bronze is a complete relief plaque that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, by 1.3 inches thick which is also an extremely high relief. This piece shows a striding panther that is walking left, and is seen looking back at it's handler which is a nude walking Eros. The nude walking Eros is also seen pulling a rope that is secured around the neck of the panther, and the walking Eros also has wings that are seen behind his back. The panther is seen with his head facing the viewer, and the body of the Eros is twisted with an open chest towards the viewer as well. The entire scene is framed by a Greek acanthus pattern at the top, and scrolls to the left and right. This plaque likely was an applique that was attached to a bronze hydria or a bronze vessel of some type, and is a scarce example. The panther was sacred to Dionysus, and the Eros may be a representative of Dionysus as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece also hangs from a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Published: Royal-Athena Galleries: "Gods and Mortals", 1989, no. 13. ($3,750.00 fixed price.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which are not very noticeable, and overall, this piece is a solid example that can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372973
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter. This attractive little piece has three palmette pattern designs seen at the front side, and the back side has a single strap handle attached to the extended neck and the upper shoulder of the vessel. A black band is seen on the outer edge of the upper lip, and also above the "disk-shaped" base. There is a linear "ray-pattern" seen on the upper shoulder, and all of the design elements seen on this attractive vessel lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and is in near mint condition, save for some minor and minute scuff marks seen on the back side of the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the base disk. A nice "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece that is better than most examples. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381928
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This piece is a Chimu blackware feline aryballos that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high, by 5.5 inches wide from ear to ear, and is in flawless intact condition with no repair and/or restoration. This mold made ceramic has a nice deep even black glaze over the entire outer surface, and some spotty white calcite deposits. The black glaze also has some thicker added glaze that forms some linear designs of the feline, and one such design appears to be cat whiskers. This piece has a powerful feline bust that is formed from the main body of the vessel, and the face appears to be snarling at the viewer with a toothy open mouth. This feline likely represents a jaguar, and this vessel is also a "protector" type vessel. The ears are also seen extended from each side, and there is a raised spout seen rising up from the center of the vessel, which defines this vessel type as an "aryballos". This type of vessel was also subsequently produced by the Chimu/Inka, and was their most common vessel type. The ears also have a hole centered within, and this vessel was also likely a "suspension" type vessel, and this along with the raised spout, easily controlled the flow of a liquid such as "chicha". This piece also has a slightly rounded bottom, and easily stands by itself. A ring base is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This rare Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at sacred shrines such as Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Export Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402052
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This piece is a scarce Etruscan black glazed-ware kernos that dates circa 5th-4rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.9 inches high, by 3.1 inches wide. This interesting vessel has three raised interconnected containers that all have a base ring and a flared rim. There is a suspension ring seen at the center, and the black glaze is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of the vessel. This type of vessel is known as a "Kernos" vessel, meaning "a vase for multiple offerings", and was used in religious ceremonies such as the Eleusinian Mysteries. These sacred vessels were made to contain ritual ingredients such as wheat, barley, honey, and wine. The "Duenos Inscription", one of the earliest known "Old Latin" texts, dated to the 7th-5th century B.C., was also found inscribed around a small Etruscan "kernos" vessel as the type offered here. (See Arthur Gordon, "Notes on the Duenos-Vase Inscription in Berlin", California Studies in Classical Antiquity, Vol. 8, 1975, pp. 53-72.) These sacred religious vessels were also used in the cults of Demeter and Cybele, as this type of vessel was specifically made for religious ceremonies. This scarce and intact vessel has no repair and/or restoration, some spotty light brown mineral deposits, some minor light brown burnishing, minor root marking, and is a superb little vessel for the type. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299352
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful x-large Greek Apulian ceramic is a knob-handled patera plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 18.2 inches wide from handle to handle, by 6.5 inches high, and is attributed to the Ganymede Painter. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, and is a superb intact example that is 100% original. The overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, save for some minor glaze checkering on the inside surface, and some minor and minute stress cracks which are all normal for an ancient Greek ceramic of this size. This piece also has some minute root marking seen mostly on the bottom base stem, and attractive heavy spotty white calcite deposits that are seen on various sections of the vessel. This piece has not been over-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition, which is scarce for a vessel of this size; and in addition, what is also not often seen is that this piece also has very vibrant black, dark orange, yellow, and white colors. This piece has two decorative black raised handles attached on each side of the raised flat rim, and in addition, there are four raised knobs attached to the flat rim which are seen on each side of each handle. There is an additional knob seen in the top middle of each handle as well. These knobs are also very decorative, and may have served in antiquity as an additional hand grip on the vessel, as this type of vessel was typically used to pour libations. The center of this beautiful plate has a draped seated woman seen seated on a rock, and is holding a plate and floral garland. She is facing a standing nude youth that is seen showing an open box, and is holding a wreath in his right hand. The drapery seen on her body is very detailed and translucent, which lends this figure an erotic look. The entire scene is also balanced with each figure holding an object away from the center of the scene, and in this case, the standing nude youth is seen holding a wreath, and the draped seated woman is holding a garland which balance the scene of the overall composition. Both figures are seen on a "dot-and-egg" pattern band that is seen below a minute "dotted" ground line, and the entire scene is seen within a sacred white olive-leaf wreath that frames the entire scene. The underside of this beautiful plate has a black reserve, with a raised footed base. The Ganymede painter was one of the best accomplished Greek Apulian artists during the second half of the 4th century B.C., and according to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, London, 1989, p. 96: "His drawing is more fluid and his youths have a softer look. He is fond of figures holding fans, open boxes and cistae, divided by two diagonal lines." The piece offered here is a fine example of the Ganymede Painter, and knob-handled patera by this painter are scarce to rare. This piece has a very high degree of eye appeal and is scarce to rare on the market, due to it's condition, esoteric design, and that it has been attributed to the Ganymede Painter, which is rarer than the scarce examples by the Darius-Underworld and the White Sakkos Painters. (A recent example was sold by Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2014, for 9373.00 Pounds/$15,591.00 USD realized. Attributed to the Darius-Underworld Painter, circa 330 B.C., 14.75 inches diameter, 8,000.00-12,000.00 Pounds estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze knife handle in the shape of an amphora, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches high, by .75 inches wide, by .2 inches thick. This piece is a solid example and was cast as one piece, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is in the shape of a wine amphora, which has two handles attached to the upper shoulder, a fluted neck, and a wide rim. In addition, the lower body of the amphora displays a knobbed base. This piece is also decorated with several "punched concentric circles", which are also seen on both sides of the piece. This decorative element is a hallmark design of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on many bronzes from the period that display flat surfaces. There are also incised lines that cross over the body of the amphora. This attractive piece also served as a knife handle, and iron filling from the missing iron blade can still be seen within the opening at the top of the piece. This piece was likely a shaving razor, or perhaps held a punch tool extension. This piece also has an attractive light to dark green patina, with some spotty dark blue highlights. This piece also fits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. This piece can also be worn and fitted as a pendant, and this may also have been the case in antiquity. Ex: Fortuna Fine arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1366326
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Moche stirrup vessel depicting a lucuma fruit dates to the Moche IV Period, circa 400-600 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, by 4.25 inches in diameter, and has vibrant orange, dark red, black, and cream colors. This piece has a stirrup handle rising up from the center of the vessel, and the main body of the vessel depicts a very realistic opened lucuma fruit showing the dark reddish/brown seed within. The depiction of the lucuma fruit is very realistic in form, as well as with the color of the reddish/brown seed which in reality, is a glossy brown color. This piece is a votive ceramic, and likely was made to provide sustenance for the deceased in the afterlife. The Moche culture is also well known for it's realistic ceramic portraiture of actual individuals. The piece offered here is one of the best recorded examples of the lucuma fruit and is mint quality, with no repair/restoration. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1339482
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce piece is a Moche ceramic finial in the form of a moving snake, and dates circa 100-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches wide for the width of the head. This powerful piece has a nice dark to light gray polychrome glaze, with some attractive dark brown to black burnishing. There is also some spotty dark black mineral deposits, and this piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration. This powerful piece displays a snake in the act of coiling for a strike, and one can see the open mouth with the bared teeth. The head is very detailed with some incised linear markings, refined raised eyes, and a well-defined boney head. The overall piece looks very realistic, and this is an artistic style hallmark of Moche ceramics. The snake closely resembles an anaconda or a boa with the flat nose and open and raised eye design. This piece was also made from molds, and one other analogous example of this type was on the market several years ago, and this piece may have been made as a pair for a bier or as a support for a canopy. Another theory is that this piece was made for a wooden ceremonial wooden staff, and the snake for the Moche shaman, was thought to demonstrate his power by controlling opposing forces in the supernatural world, and this in turn, would allow the shaman to become a living god able to cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. For this discussion relative to the powers of Moche shaman see: "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California Press, 1978, p. 139. This "power-type" piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it really looks alive, and it sits somewhat upright on a custom metal stand. Ex: Dr. Baker collection, NM, circa 1980's. Ex: Splendors of The World, HI, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362061
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek coin is a Superb grade (EF+/EF), Achaian League silver triobol/hemidrachm, that dates circa 196-146 B.C. This superbly graded piece is well centered, is approximately 18 mm wide, and weighs 2.49 grams. This coin shows the bearded bust of Zeus facing right (Obv.) within a dotted border, and the Achaian League monogram (Rev.) within a wreath, with a club of Herakles above, and minute lettering (IY) seen to the left. This coin has exceptional artistic style, as the bust of Zeus has very fine detail with realistic features. This coin may also have been minted in Argos, which was one of the many cities that comprised the Achaian league in the northern and central Peloponnese. The League was also the foremost state in Greece after the eclipse of Macedonian power, and in 146 B.C., the League declared war on Rome, which resulted in the complete destruction of the League and the sack of Corinth, it's chief city. The coin offered here is rare in this grade, as most examples are Very Fine (VF) in condition. Ex: Frank Kovaks collection, San Francisco, CA., circa 1980's. References: Sear 2984. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369176
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay mother and child textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 12 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. Their blending of textiles with feathers is also readily evident with this piece, as there are colorful dark orange feathers that are woven into the dress of the standing woman. The face of this standing woman is also very likely, and conveys a realistic expression with it's woven nose, eyes, and mouth. This mint quality piece also has several types of textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and there are extremely detailed woven red feet and hands that resemble a "stick figurine", with extended fingers and toes. There are also individual strands of textiles that represent long hair seen on both the mother and child. The child is seen being carried at the right-hand chest of the woman, and likely represents a woman and her child in the afterlife. The woman's outer dress garment is also very detailed, and has additional textile decorative elements in addition to the attached feathers. The outer garments of this figurine were also custom made, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. These textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, and promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. One of the best recorded examples, and compete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market, and are rarely seen in this intact mint condition. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1399107
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare and extremely large Cycladic "Stargazer" Kilia type marble head dates circa 3300-2500 B.C., and is approximately 3.75 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high. This piece was once part of a complete standing idol, and the dating of these idols is difficult, although it is clear that they belong to the late Chalcolithic Period. This piece is an extremely large example, as most examples are less than half the size of the piece offered here, and as such, is a rare to extremely rare example. This piece was broken at the top of the neck, and has a break at the back of the head, and is a head that is approximately 80% complete. The popular name of "stargazer" comes from the obvious backward tilt of the head, and the small bulging eyes are set rather high. Most of the extremely rare complete idols have been broken across the neck, as seen here, suggesting that these sculptures were ritually "killed" at the time of burial. The exact function of these idols is unknown, but the design of these pieces do evoke a sense of modern design with a simplistic artistic style. This piece has a very defined raised nose, and there is small flat section at the base of this bust where it was attached to the neck of the figure. This piece also has spotty and heavy dark gray mineral deposits; and at the break at the back of the head, along with the neck break at the base of the head, the marble is crystallized with some light gray deposits. The patina seen on the break at the back of the head is also an indication that this extremely large piece was not only broken away at the neck, but is was also ritually "killed" with an extra break at the back of the head. This esoteric piece has a custom display stand which shows this piece as it would have looked attached to the main body of the piece. (For the type see: Takaoglu, Turan. "A Chalcolithic Marble Workshop at Kulaksizlar in Western Anatolia: An Analysis of Production and Craft Specialization", BAR International Series 1358, Oxford Archaeopress, 2005.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb Greek vessel is a silver plate and/or shallow bowl that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, by 7 inches in diameter, by 1/16th inch thick on the average. This scarce piece has a dark gray patina, with some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits that are seen on both sides of the vessel, and in addition, is an intact mint quality vessel in "as found" condition. This piece is a solid, thick, and heavy silver plate and/or shallow bowl that has a beaded hammered edge, and has a slightly oval form. There is also a single attached silver ring handle that easily moves up and down within it's flat "leaf-shaped" mount. This allowed this plate and/or bowl to be hung either in a room, or in a mobile fashion from a wagon or horse. This piece was hammered over a mold, and has very minute micro marks and root marking. The overall design of this vessel is rare, especially with the added ring handle which appears to be original with this vessel. Greek silver vessels of this type with the added ring handle are also thought to be Greco-Thracian, and were often produced in Greek coastal centers for export. An analogous example is seen in "Silver for the Gods", Toledo Museum exhibition catalog, 1977, p. 82, no. 45. This piece is an exceptional heavy example for the type, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388383
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This attractive Greek terracotta dates to the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3.75 inches high. This large bust is intact to just below the jaw line where it is broken at the neck, and is a bust of a goddess such as Demeter. This esoteric bust has exceptional artistic style, as the portriat is of a more mature goddess with a vibrant face with a slight smile. She is also seen wearing a diadem with perhaps agricultural stalks that are seen within the diadem. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of the seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This attractive large bust is also in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some minor earthen and mineral deposits. An exceptional example with an intact face and a high degree of eye appeal. This piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 5.3 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383326
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This piece is a Greek blackware kylix that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 10 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a deep lustrous black glaze on the inner and outer surfaces, save for the bottom of the raised ring base that has an unglazed section known as the "reserve" section, and this is a light red terracotta. This attractive piece has an impressed "star pattern" with four acanthus leaves in the bottom center of the bowl, along with two curved handles that are solidly attached to the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits with a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, and overall, is in it's natural "as found" condition. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. This solid piece can also be modified with a modern clasp, and can easily be worn today. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325706
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This very rare coin is a silver diobol attributed to the city mint of Kebren, Troas, in Asia Minor. This coin is dated circa 480-450 B.C., and is in about extremely fine condition (EF-/EF). This coin is approximately 1.3 gms, is 8mm in diameter, and has a dark gray patina. This coin features a bust of a female goddess facing left, and has "Archaic Period" type artistic style with a slight smile and braded hair. The reverse features a bust of a ram facing left, within an incuse punch square. The female bust on the obverse has been attributed as representing Apollo, but this image is likely a "Korai", as this bust is seen with earrings along with the long braded hair. The "Korai" were also female goddess that were prominently displayed in ancient Athens with the analogous female smiling faces as seen on this coin. Another example of this extremely rare coin was offered by Numismatica Ars Classica AG, Zurich, Switzerland, May 2017, Auction 100, no. 1119. (500 Swiss Francs estimate. This coin is also graded Very Fine Plus. VF+.) The attractive coin offered here is not only an extremely rare coin seldom seen on the market in this condition, but it is also a rare depiction of a "Korai" goddess. References: SNG von Aulock 1546; Rosen 534. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This mint quality piece is a very large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This large-scale piece in intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in it's natural mint quality "as found" condition. This piece has a dark brown body glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this large-scale piece has two lines seen on the lower body above the raised footed base, and triangular cream and dark brown patterns seen on the upper flat handle rims. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown body glaze seen on the majority of these "Messapian" pieces is normally worn away. The reason for this is that the dark brown body glaze is usually very thin, as it was generally applied simply as a "wash type" glaze. However, the dark brown body glaze seen on this exceptional example is somewhat thicker, and the overall condition of this piece is also better than most ceramics attributed to this culture. The "Messapian" culture was also a native Greek culture from southern Italy, and their vessels were largely derived from imported Attic models", as cited by A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and are especially thicker under the raised footed base, and in addition, the piece offered here is also likely a votive example, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery from southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is x-rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date,culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1363649
Apolonia Ancient Art
$375.00
This rare Byzantine bronze coin is a "double-follis" attributed to Basil II, circa 976-1025 A.D., and is likely Constantinople mint. This rare coin is approximately 35mm wide, weighs approximately 22.1 gms, and is in extremely fine/extremely fine (EF/EF) condition. This coin was minted at the height of the Byzantine Empire under Basil II, and is approximately twice the weight of a "single follis", as the average weight of a "single follis" is approximately 9.54-10.25 grams. This rare coin is a denomination seldom seen on the market, as it was produced with dies that were used for a "single follis", along with a flan that is simply twice the weight of a "single follis". This coin type is also classified as a "medallion", and Byzantine "medallions" were only minted on special occasions. The obverse (Obv.) features the bust of Christ Pantokrator with long hair, along with the image of a halo and cross behind, and within each limb of the cross, there are five dots. There are also two dots seen to the right of the bust, all within a dotted border. The reverse (Rev.) features three lines of lettering that also name Basil II. This superb Byzantine bronze also has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is not only a nice example of a Byzantine bronze coin, but it is also a Christian artifact in this large size. References: Sear 1813 (follis); Berk 948 (follis). Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373047
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce Roman bronze lamp dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long, by 1.1 inches high. This piece is complete, has no breaks and/or chips, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two openings, one in the top center for filling oil, and the other at the end of the vessel that would hold the wick. The other end of the vessel has an attachment hoop for a chain, or a cord, and could have been hung as a votive offering pendant. This piece also has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself. This piece not only was likely made as a votive offering, but it was also likely functional as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with dark red highlights, and has some heavy dark brown mineral deposits on the inside of the vessel. This piece comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #599095
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This superb Roman bronze piece is an applique with the image of Silenus. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., and is in the form of a facing head, with an attached peg that extends about 1.5 inches from the back side of the applique. This piece was probably mounted in an object such as a furniture piece, or a bronze and wooden door, or a composite work or arms such as a Roman shield. A piece with this type of design, with the extended peg, could have fit in a number of objects. The Sileni were native not to Greece, but to Phrygia in Roman Asia, and personified the genii of springs and rivers. Unlike the Satyrs who derive chiefly from the he-goat, the Sileni derive rather from the horse, whose tail hooves, and even ears they possess. This piece clearly shows the horse ears and shows Silenus as a fat old man, snub-nosed, always drunk, who was in the retinue of Dionysus. Silenus was the tutor of Dionysus and had helped him form his character, and the bust seen here is a very powerful and intense image of Silenus. The diameter of this piece is approximately 1.4 inches and the length is approximately 2 inches. This piece has a dark green patina with red highlights and the detail is superb. There are also some heavy dark green mineral deposits seen on the extended peg. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom black/plexiglas base and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Greek bronze coin is a Tarsos (AE 26mm), and dates circa 164-27 B.C. This coin is approximately 27 mm wide, weighs 16.3 gms, and is in very fine/good very fine condition (VF/VF+). This coin is also scarce regardless of grade, and overall, this coin is a better example than what is usually seen, and in addition, this coin has a beautiful even dark green patina. The obverse (Obv.) features a seated Tyche on a chair facing right, holding a grain ear, and below, the river god Kydnos is swimming right. The reverse (Rev.) features Zeus Nikephoros seated on a throne facing left, and is holding a Nike with a magistrates legend seen below the extended arm. The Greek legend (TARSOS) is also seen behind the detailed throne. The design of the seated Zeus and throne also copies the earlier coins of Alexander the Great, and the seated Tyche seen on the obverse is also a scarce depiction in ancient Greek coinage. Tyche was the patron goddess of Tarsos, and was easily recognized in antiquity as such, and this is also an explanation why this coin has no obverse legend. A nice Greek bronze with a beautiful dark green patina. References: Sear 5674; SNG Levante 979. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385018
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, weighs 16.9 gms, and grades superb quality (EF+) to (FDC) mint state. This beautiful piece features on the obverse (Obv.) the young bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style that what is normally seen. The young dainty features portray an eternally young goddess, and this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. The entire obverse design also portrays a Macedonian hoplite shield, and the outer rim shows Macedonian royal stars seen within semi-circles. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First Region.). There is also an (A) monogram seen within the framing ivy wreath, and this may refer to Amphipolis. The coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and subsequently, no coinage was struck in the region for another half century. This piece has some mint luster, is in superb condition, and an exceptional artistic style which all make this beautiful coin scarce on the market. An exceptional Greek coin struck under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7; Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385356
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek "Xenon ware" kantharos, and dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Greek Apulian pottery from southern Italy that also has Greek mainland attributes. This attractive piece has a beautiful deep black glaze, a ring base, looped handles, and a dark orange painted box on each side that features various ivy tendrils and wave designs. There is also some nice minute spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on this mint quality vessel that has no repair and/or restoration. This vessel is scarce in this condition, and is a better example that what is usually seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1260877
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Mayan ceramic that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 4.5 inches high, and is in superb intact condition with only a few minute abrasions. This piece also has an attractive orange and light brown polychrome glaze, with some heavy and spotty black mineral deposits. This interesting vessel is in the form of a sitting rabbit, and has all four legs tucked under the body. There is also a single rattle that is built into the animated hollow head, and rattles of this type are normally seen in the rounded hollow legs of select Mayan tripod vessels. This appealing vessel is designed to sit horizontally as a rabbit would be at rest, and also upright, as if the rabbit is raised up on it's hind legs. In addition, there are three suspension holes, one under each front leg, and one that runs through the head. This allowed one to control a liquid that could then be poured from the raised hole that is seen on the upper back of the rabbit. This piece also has a black Mayan mat symbol which is painted on the belly of the rabbit. The rabbit, for the Maya, was a deity associated with scribal or artistic roles, and was the patron god of the Mayan scribe. According to Michael Coe in "The Art of the Maya Scribe", Abrams Pub., New York, 1998, p. 110: "The much illustrated little Rabbit God writing a codex on the Princeton Vase makes only one showing as a scribe in the art of the classic Maya. He must be the same rabbit that the Maya saw on the face of the moon, and is iconographically linked with the Moon Goddess, who often is depicted holding him in her arms." The piece offered here may represent a scribe as a rabbit, but more likely it represents the "Rabbit God" himself, who also doubles as the patron god of the Mayan scribes. This vessel may also have been a "paint pot" for a Mayan scribe and/or it may also have been a votive vessel for an important individual such as a Mayan scribe. The artistic style of the painted black Mayan mat seen on this piece, is also analogous to the painted mats seen on "Copador" type vessels. The name "Copador" is a contraction of Copan and El Salvador, and refers to the zone of distribution for this type of vessel. This piece may also refer to the 13th ruler of Copan, "18 Rabbit", who acceded to the throne circa 695 A.D., and ruled for 43 years. Under his rule in Copan, Copan's population was growing as never before, and the "Copador" polychrome ware was being manufactured and distributed over a wide area in the Mayan world. This energetic ruler erected many monuments, including one of the largest ballcourts (Ballcourt A-III), which was second only to the Great Court at Chichen Itza. Linda Schele also felt that this ruler was also the greatest single patron of the arts in Copan's history, based on the number of works and the high-relief style of carving. (See "Scribes, Warriors, and Kings", by William Fash, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1991, p. 125.) Hence, it's quite possible that the vessel offered here also referred to this ruler of Copan, in addition to representing the "Rabbit God" of the Mayan scribes. This piece is a rare intact Mayan vessel designed in animal form, and full bodied Mayan "animal form" type ceramics are seldom seen on the market. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1400499
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce example is a Bactrian alabaster chalice that dates to the late 3rd-early 2nd Millennium B.C., circa 2100-1700 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 5.8 inches in diameter at the upper rim, and has a beautiful dark honey brown patina, with some heavy to light dark brown mineral deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece has a flat upper rim, elongated stemmed base, a flared upper body, and a low capacity bowl that has an inner rounded bottom. The carving is exceptional for a vessel such as this, as there are graceful curves and flared edges that are seen within the overall design of this vessel. This piece was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel, as the inner bowl has a low capacity for precious liquids, and in addition, this piece is rather heavy and takes two hands to comfortably handle. This esoteric piece was produced by a culture known as the "Bactria-Margiana" culture, and/or the "Oxus Civilization" culture, and was spread across an area encompassing Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Northern Afghanistan. This piece was carved from a fine white-veined alabaster, and vessels of this type were made for the ruling class and aristocratic elites. This complete piece has some limited repair seen mostly with the elongated stemmed base, and is an exceptional example for the type, as it is a complete example with a natural patina that has not been over cleaned as most examples have. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, December 2000, no. 681. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $3,290.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338480
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb quality Greek bronze coin (17mm) was minted in Pherai, and dates to the circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is graded EF+/EF+ (Superb quality), is approximately 17mm in diameter, and is scarce in this grade. This piece has on the obverse, the goddess Hekate facing right, wearing a laurel wreath and earring. The image of Hekate on ancient Greek coinage is rare, and is seldom seen. Hekate was called the daughter of Demeter or Pheraea, and was associated with the fertility of the ground. The ancient city of Pherai was also named after Pheraea as well. The reverse has a detailed head of a lion facing right with an open mouth, and the Greek lettering of PH-ERAI seen around the head of the lion. There is also water seen flowing forth from the lion's open mouth, and the image of the lion seen on this coinage may represent a public and/or sacred fountain. This piece also has an attractive even dark green patina, with some light dark green surface deposits. Pherai was a city located west of Mt. Pelion in Thessaly, and was the second largest city in ancient Thessaly after Larissa. Reference: Sear 2207. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398684
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive and complete piece is a Roman bronze hanging lamp that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This two-part piece is approximately 4.7 inches long, by 1 inch high for the main body of the lamp; and 4 inches long, by 2 inches high for the hanging nail hook. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with dark red highlights, and is in superb "as found" condition; as the hanging chain is complete, the hanging nail hook is intact, and the attachment lanyards on the lamp are intact. This piece was also cast as one piece, and the main body of the lamp has raised round circles at the bottom base which diffused heat. This lamp also has a double spout, and the hanging nail hook allowed this lamp to be extremely portable, and there is a distinct possibility that this lamp was made for a Roman legion that was on the move. It's also important to note that the chain, the hanging nail hook, and the main body of the piece are also contiguous, as evidenced by the matching patina seen on all of these pieces. A superb and complete hanging lamp not often seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1399734
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extra large and impressive piece is a Mayan brownware ceremonial tripod vessel that dates to the Early Classic Period, circa 450-650 A.D., and is approximately 13 inches in diameter, by 9 inches high. This impressive piece is a thick walled light to dark brown terracotta ceramic, that has three "slab type" legs attached to the flat base. This tripod bowl vessel is also somewhat heavy, and the three attached "slab type" legs have identical decorative architectural elements molded onto the outer surface of each leg. There are also three separate impressed panels with decorative elements that are seen on the outer surface of the bowl, and these panels are also identical, as they were made with a stamp that was rolled onto the outer surface of the bowl. These decorative elements show a two-part scene that is divided with a column, and to the right of the column, there is an elaborately attired standing figure with outstretched arms holding implements. The left side of the column shows a "central glyph medallion" flanked by winged motifs and stylized birds seen in profile. The "central glyph medallion" has three dots seen in the center, and this resembles the Mayan glyph meaning "moon". This "central glyph medallion" also appears to be attached to a raised stela that is also seen with three dots at the top. The stylized birds seen in profile at each side of the "central glyph medallion" are also of a raptor type with a hooked beak, and may represent either an eagle of a vulture which were both sacred to the Maya. There is also a stylized wavy band seen below. This type of heavy tripod bowl has strong Teotihuacan influence, and is a type of vessel that the Mayan produced in the Early Classic Period. This piece was often used in ceremony, and likely held an offering such as an agricultural commodity, or even a sacrificial head. A thick black glaze was also added at the bottom of this bowl in order to control a liquid, and this is the only glaze seen on this piece. The number "three" is seen multiple times on this piece with the three separate panels, the three "slab type" legs, the three dots seen within the "central glyph medallion", and the three dots seen at the top of the raised stela; and seen in combination, may have some other hidden ceremonial meaning. This impressive Mayan piece is complete, is 100% original, and has been repaired from several large fragments, as most "large scale" Mayan ceramics of this type have. There is also some minute root marking seen on the inside bottom of the bowl and some spotty mineral deposits seen in sections of the entire piece. An impressive "large scale" ceremonial type vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Palm Beach Atlantic College, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May, 1989, no. 377. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1088689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,800.00
This extremely rare piece is an attractive canteen type vessel that has been classified as Nazca culture, circa 500-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches high by 8.75 inches wide, has a small raised opening, and is heart shaped. This piece also stands by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and is very easy to handle with both hands due to it's "V-shaped" design. This esoteric "V-shaped" piece has a beautiful and even dark red glaze, and may have been designed to represent a human heart. In addition, this piece has a small extended central top spout, which somewhat resembles a blood vessel for a heart. This piece also has two lug handles, seen on each side of the vessel, and these handles were made in order to suspend the vessel. The suspension of this vessel acted as an aid for one in the careful pouring of a liquid, and as such, this vessel was probably created for ceremonial use. It is also possible that, given the heart shape, the handle design, and the dark red color of this esoteric piece, the liquid contained within this vessel may have been human blood which was used for ceremony. This piece was also lavishly published with a full page color photo in "Art of the Andes, Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections" by Paul Clifford and Elizabeth Benson, The Arthur M. Sackler Foundation and The AMS Foundation for the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, Washington D.C. publishers, 1983, no. 143. (See attached photo.) The following description of this piece is seen in the above publication on page 268: "The widest area of this kidney-shaped canteen is at the top. Its short spout has a thickened rim, and loop handles are attached to the sides just below the shoulder. The entire vessel is painted with a red slip. Such a vessel shape does not appear in any of the literature, but there is a similar piece in a New York collection known to the author. (The following is a footnote relative to the New York example: "Seen while on loan to the Duke University Museum.") The surface color and finish are comparable to the Nazca panpipes in Number 142 (See attached photo.), and the bottle is therefore included with the Nazca material, although actual provenance is not known. The minimum age indicated in the thermoluminescence analysis indicates that the piece was fired in antiquity, but does not provide any basis of dating beyond that minimum age. Further technical measurements, such as trace element analysis of the clay and analysis of the slip with which the vessel was painted may, in the future, provide a method for establishing provenance, if comparisons can be made with similar analysis of other objects". (The following is a footnote regarding the two thermoluminescence (TL) tests that were performed on this piece by the Sackler Foundation: "OX-TL reference no. 381f1, 02/08/83 and 05/26/83 estimates that the sample tested has a minimum age of 470 years according to results of two TL tests, one to analyze fading.") The bottom of the piece has an inventory no. N-110, and there are two minute holes which indicate where the two above TL tests were taken. This intact piece is also in mint condition, and has an even glaze that is a brilliant deep red color. This extremely rare piece is also one of the top esoteric vessels, if not the most esoteric vessel offered by the Sackler Foundation. This piece is extremely rare, and so much so, it has also been labeled as "Teotino culture" by some pre-Columbian experts. In addition, this piece has been published as "Nazca (?) culture" by the Sakler Foundation, and has had extensive academic research and testing by their pre-Columbian academics, including Elizabeth Benson and Paul Clifford. The description of this published piece offered here, therefore follows the Sakler academic description as: Nasca (?), Peru, South Coast. Ex: Arthur M. Sackler collection, circa 1970's, accession no. N-110. Published: "Art of the Andes", (As noted above), 1983, no. 143. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1313512
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek Hellenistic period bronze torso of a striding Herakles, and dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This piece shows a striding nude Herakles who is seen wearing his lion's skin cloak draped over his left shoulder and arm, and this cloak is attached by a round fibula seen on his right shoulder. This lion's skin cloak is also designed with a stippled dotted design, which denotes this garment as being made from an animal skin. This torso has an intact left arm, and this Herakles figurine appears to be holding a round patera or possibly a vessel of some sort. This figurine also has both muscular legs, with the right leg seen striding forward, and the movement of this powerfully muscular body is easily seen. The torso is very well defined, and displays a very high degree of art, and is much better than most figurines of this type. This attractive piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and is evenly seen around the entire piece. This piece is an exceptional Greek bronze torso with an equally exceptional patina, and is scarce on today's market in this condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that dates, Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glossy black glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck, as is seen with this vessel. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1262216
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a complete Greek bronze mitra piece that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.1 inches high by 7.25 inches wide, is intact with no repair/restoration, and is complete save for a small missing tip of one side. This piece was designed to be suspended from a belt, and likely hung below the rim of a bronze bell corselet. The shape of this piece also suggests that it protected the stomach and lower abdomen, and perhaps each side of the hips as well, with more than one piece attached to a leather belt. There are two holes seen at each end of the central stem which likely held rings that attached to the leather belt. This method of attachment allowed this piece to freely move at the bottom, and allowed the warrior ease of movement as this piece was able to move with the body. According to Herbert Hoffmann in "Early Cretan Armorers", Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 9-10: "The Cretan mitra was designed to be suspended from a belt and to hang below the rim of the bell corselet. The total absence from the find of anything that might be identified as part of a metal belt suggests that the mitrai were worn from a belt of perishable material. Most examples are semicircular sheets of bronze 5 to 7.5mm thick, varying in height from 12.5 to 18 cms. and in breadth from 21.5 to 29.5 cms. The edges of their wide flat rims are sometimes rolled over a bronze wire, the straight upper edge being rolled outward and the edge of the crescent inward. Three holes are punched in the sheet metal near the top edge, one at the center and one at each end, to accommodate rings from which the mitra was suspended. The function of these bronze plates as stomach protectors was recognized by Furtwangler when he published the first examples discovered at Olympia. F. Poulsen gave them the Homeric name 'mitra' in his publication of the specimen from Rethymnon, and the term has had archaeological respectability ever since (although what sort of body armor Homer meant is highly debatable). In endeavoring to define the role played by mitrai in Greek combat we must take into account their geographical distribution. This form of armor is to date documented only from Crete, Thrace, and Etruria - three regions of the ancient world noted for their archers. It seems likely that mitrai were meant to protect their wearers against arrows, i.e. that they were worn by hoplites frequently exposed to archery attack." (An example published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, pl. 40, no. 3, is slightly larger than the example offered here, has three suspension rings, and has a half crescent shape. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has a slightly different design than the known examples published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, and the design of this piece may point to Cyprus, and if this is the case, the piece offered here may be one of the earliest examples of it's type, and pre-dates the published Hoffmann examples that date circa mid to late 7th century B.C. The inside of the exceptional piece offered here also likely had a leather liner, and/or had a thick leather pad which attached to the additional perimeter holes seen on this piece. This piece also has fine workmanship, as there are raised punched round knobs that are seen running around the perimeter of the piece. These knobs, besides being very decorative, also add strength to the overall piece. This piece has a beautiful light green patina with some heavy dark green and blue mineralization, along with some white calcite deposits, and the patina and mineral deposits are also heavier on the backside of this piece. Greek armor from this early period is extremely rare, and even fragments from this period are seldom seen on the market. This piece is attached to a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: