Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1319158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two scarce bronze pieces are from the Urnfield culture, and date late Bronze Age, circa 13th-10th century B.C. These two matching detailed pieces are each approximately 4 to 3.6 inches in diameter, as they are elliptical in shape. They each have an opening that is approximately 1.22 inches wide, and these were made to fit on the upper or lower arm. Each piece also has an incised "line-and-herringbone" design that is seen running around the entire outer edge of each piece, and runs from each terminal end to terminal end. This incised design is very detailed, and can easily be seen some distance from each piece. These pieces are in mint "as found" condition, and have no repair/restoration. They also have an even and beautiful dark blue to dark green patina that is exceptional. It is also more likely that these pieces were votive, and were not intended to be worn every day, but it may also be possible that these pieces were worn for special ceremonial events. This type of piece has also been found in votive hoard offerings, and the pieces offered here could also have been created entirely for this purpose, as bronze was extremely valuable at the time that these pieces were created. The Urnfield Culture, circa 1300 B.C.-750 B.C., was a late Bronze Age culture of central Europe, and it's name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields. The Urnfield culture followed the Tumulus culture and was succeeded by the Hallstatt culture. Linguistic evidence and continuity with the subsequent Hallstatt culture suggests that the people of this area spoke an early form of celtic, perhaps originally proto-Celtic. It's also notable that the early Urnfield period, circa 1300 B.C., was a time when the warriors of central Europe were often heavily armored with body armor, helmets, and shields all made of bronze. The Urnfield culture has votive weapons, bronze pins, and bracelets such as the pieces offered here, that often have been found in warrior's graves. This prolific amount of bronze weapons and objects, attributed to this culture, likely borrowed the idea and burial customs from Mycenaean Greece. These pieces also hang from an included custom display stand. These solid pieces have a great deal of eye appeal and can easily be worn today. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1286571
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce to rare piece is a Mayan terracotta model of a throne, which dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 6.4 inches long, by 3.2 inches wide. This piece is made from four molded pieces, and the details and images seen on this piece were mold pressed into the terracotta. The front side of this piece shows a facing god figure, who also appears to be supporting the weight of the upper panel. The upper panel also shows two square "mat designs" which each show twelve boxes with a "spiral" symbol within. This "spiral" symbol is likely depicted as meaning "CH'ICH", meaning "blood", and/or "blood offering". This symbol also makes perfect sense for this piece, as this piece may also portray an offering altar, as well as portraying a throne that may have supported a seated figurine. The two holes seen at the top may be for pins to help support a seated figurine, but they may also represent holes that were used to drain the blood from the two panels, and this blood would then drip down below the altar and to the underworld gods below. According to the Mayan belief of blood offerings, each drop of blood would nourish the gods and the earth, ensuring a new abundant maize harvest that would feed the people and provide wealth for the court. If this was the case regarding this piece, then this piece likely is a votive representation of an offering altar where bloody offerings were placed for the gods, and this type of altar may also have doubled as a sacred throne for a Mayan royal personage. The emerging facing god seen at the front of this piece, may be a frontal version of the "War Serpent God", otherwise known as the "Jaguar-Serpent-Bird God". This composite image is primarily associated with warfare, and was a popular image with the Maya at Piedras Negras and Chichen Itza. The image seen on this piece also has feathers above each extened arm, jaguar-paw hands, a double necklace, large round ear-flares, and a nose guard attachment. (For the type of god seen here, see "The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya" by Mary Miller and Karl Taube, Thames and Hudson1993, pp. 104-105.) This complete piece is 100% original, and was repaired from four large fragments. There are also minute black spotty mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece. This type of votive piece is seldom seen on the market, and also displays a Mayan god that is seldom seen. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323957
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb to extremely fine coin is a Greek silver drachm attributed to Philip III, and was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-319 B.C., is in superb to extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), is approximately 17 mm in diameter, weighs 4.2 gms, has nice centering, and a light gray patina. The obverse shows Herakles wearing a lion's skin headdress facing right, all within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, holding a standing eagle to the front, with a Greek monogram seen at the front and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering seen behind, all within a dotted border. This coin was minted in the name of Philip III Arridaeus, half brother of Alexander the Great, who was slated to share power with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king Alexander the Great. The real power still lay behind the generals - Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolomy and others - who were all biding their time for power. The coin offered here was likely minted by Antigonos, who had control of the bulk of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. This coin is also attributed to the mint of "Magnesia ad Maeandrum", and "minted circa 323-319 B.C." by Martin Price, who also noted that this mint was also controlled by Antigonos at the time this coin was minted. A nice coin with historical merit, and a nice quality example. References: Sear no. 6750; Price no. P56a. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288894
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek silver straining spoon that dates circa 3rd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This rare piece is approximately 4.9 inches long, by .9 inches in diameter at the bowl. This piece was hand beaten into shape, and the bowl was formed over a mold and attached to the shaft. There are five holes seen in the base of the bowl, and this piece likely served as a rare spice strainer at the table of a wealthy individual. There is also a curled hoop at the end, and this likely was hung in an ancient kitchen/household. This piece may also have served in a commercial capacity, and may also have been used to measure out a valuable "powder" type commodity. This specialized silver piece is seldom seen on the market, as it has fine construction and is seldom found as an individual type find. This piece also is somewhat analogous to the late Hellenistic silver spoon that is known as a "cochleare", as this type of piece also has a small rounded bowl which is attached to a shaft with a pointed terminal end. This type of "cochleare" spoon does not have any holes in the bottom of the bowl, and is thought to have been used for eating eggs and shellfish. For the "cochleare" type see: "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate" by D.E. Strong, Methuen & CO., Ltd., 1966, p. 155. The complete piece offered here also has an attractive dark gray patina, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This dainty little piece is an exceptional example of Greek silver plate, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363343
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This lovely piece is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter through the center of the vessel. This piece features an elongated strap handle that is approximately 5.5 inches high, from the top of the handle to where it attaches to the main body of the vessel. This strap handle also has two small, finely worked rivets that attach this handle to the lip of the vessel, and a heart shaped applique, on the other end of the handle, which is attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece has a flat bottom and stands very stable, as this piece is well balanced. This exceptionally well designed piece also has a raised lip that allowed for better control of a precious liquid, such as an oil-based unguent, and this may also have been the primary function of the raised elongated strap handle. This piece likely served as an accessory for a woman's toilet cabinet, and is an extremely rare to rare design with this elongated handle. This piece has a beautiful dark and light green patina with dark red highlights, and has some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and the raised strap handle is remarkably intact and complete. An exceptional Greek bronze vessel that is also a rare type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Export Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398614
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze military horse saddle cinch handle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 3.3 inches long, by 2.7 inches wide at the terminal end, by 1.7 inches high at the ring attachment. This piece is a scarce to rare example with no repair and/or restoration, and was mounted on a leather strap that was fitted to a Roman saddle. There are two holes seen at one end that held rivets for the leather strap, and the terminal end has two flaring dotted ends that allowed one to firmly grip this handle. There is also a raised ring that locked this handle in place with another strap. This entire piece was also made to firmly wrap around the attached leather strap which tucked deeply into the handle. The overall design of this piece is very practical, and is a scarce Roman military cavalry piece not often seen on the market. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits. For the type of a Roman military cavalry saddle see: "The Roman Cavalry" by Karen Dixon and Pat Southern, Barnes and Noble Books Pub., 2000. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383122
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This scarce Greek Attic piece is a vessel stand, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This appealing piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 3.5 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece is made from a light red terracotta, and there are several dark brown and red glazed concentric circles that are seen mostly on the underside, and on the topside of the raised flat top base. This piece also has a well-designed rounded lip that is slightly raised over the flat top base, and this design feature was an aid in securing a vessel that would have been placed on this stand. This piece also has a wide fluted base, and has two small holes near the edge of the base that were designed to suspend this piece from a small cord. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a scarce Greek Attic ceramic type, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This mint quality and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. The facial features of this appealing piece have fine detail, and also have a rather haunting and mysterious look. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339561
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These two fine designed pieces are two matching Viking bronze bracelets that date, circa 9th-10th century A.D. These two Viking culture pieces are approximately 3 inches long, by 2.6 inches in diameter for one bracelet; and the other bracelet is slightly larger and is approximately 3.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches in diameter. Both of these beautiful examples have matching hand stamped intricate pattern design work, and they were made from a single sheet of bronze, hand stamped, then folded into the form seen today. These pieces still retain some flexibility, and in antiquity, they were able to easily flex for the wearer of these bracelets who was likely a young woman. These pieces have a lovely dark green patina, with some attractive spotty dark blue azurite mineral deposits seen in various outer and inner sections of both bracelets. These pieces both display a hand stamped "triangular symbol", with three dots within, that are designed interlocking and are seen running around the perimeter within a double dotted border. There are also two raised bars that run through the middle, and there is a minute and detailed "interwoven cable pattern" seen between, and this "interwoven cable pattern" is seen again on each side of the bracelets. There are also four raised dots with a dotted border that may solar symbols, and extensive minute dotted line work is seen in various sections of the bracelets. The overall hand stamped design seen on both bracelets is very finely done, and the composition of the design work seen on both bracelets match. Only a skilled artist for the period could have produced the matching hand stamped composition seen on both pieces. Both of these nice examples are 100% original, and are intact, save for the slightly larger example that has two strengthened and repaired stress cracks which is normal for very thin bronze metal pieces such as these. These pieces are scarce with the high degree of workmanship seen on these two beautiful pieces, and fine high quality minute Viking hand stamped work is not often seen on the market. These pieces sit on a custom display stand, and can easily removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399232
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Roman bronze cherub that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This exceptional piece is intact, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute light green mineral deposits. This attractive piece also has some gold gilt seen on the toga that is seen draped over one shoulder and is tied at the waist. This cute cherub is very animated, and is seen looking up and appears to be holding a plate or some other object that may have held an offering. His open palms likely balanced a plate on one shoulder, and his toga also padded the weight. He is seen looking up with a slightly smiling open mouth, and his fine straight hair falls behind his tilted head. This cherub has a chubby type body and is seen completely nude from behind. This piece is intact, is in near mint "as found" condition, and is a scarce example. This exceptional Roman bronze may also have been part of another vessel of some sort, as there are remnants of a round mounting pin seen under the left leg. This piece has a custom display stand, and is a wonderful little Roman bronze. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: