Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369176
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay mother and child textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 12 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. Their blending of textiles with feathers is also readily evident with this piece, as there are colorful dark orange feathers that are woven into the dress of the standing woman. The face of this standing woman is also very likely, and conveys a realistic expression with it's woven nose, eyes, and mouth. This mint quality piece also has several types of textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and there are extremely detailed woven red feet and hands that resemble a "stick figurine", with extended fingers and toes. There are also individual strands of textiles that represent long hair seen on both the mother and child. The child is seen being carried at the right-hand chest of the woman, and likely represents a woman and her child in the afterlife. The woman's outer dress garment is also very detailed, and has additional textile decorative elements in addition to the attached feathers. The outer garments of this figurine were also custom made, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. These textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, and promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. One of the best recorded examples, and compete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market, and are rarely seen in this intact mint condition. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1249675
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche seated man that is Moche IV Period, circa 450-550 A.D., and is approximately 8.3 inches high. This interesting piece is intact, save for a minute filled stress crack in the upper stirrup-handle, and is in superb condition with vibrant dark red, light brown, and cream colors. This piece is a seated Moche man who is dressed with regal ear flares, a wrapped headdress, a dark red back sack, and a cream colored tunic. The individual portrayed here does appear to have some social status in a regal or religious context, as he is seen finely dressed, and he is also seen holding a ceramic in each hand which may point to a ceremonial activity. This individual displays a pronounced facial deformity, which was also held in high regard by the Moche, as this was thought to be a sign from the gods. Special status and sacredness may have been accorded to those who suffered diseases and other physical handicaps. The pronounced deformed face of this individual has skin drawn tight over the bones, and is likely the result of a tropical disease. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture, and the piece offered here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture. Moche ceramics that are medical related, and depict individuals with diseases and/or deformities such as this piece, are rare to extremely rare. Another analogous example that portrays a deformed face is seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrara", Thames and Hudson Pub., by Kathlenn Berrin, San Francisco, 1997, no. 69. (See attached photo. This portrait-head type vessel seen in the Larco Herrara Museum may also be a portrait of the same individual as seen on the ceramic offered here. Both pieces have analogous features and are both Moche IV Period.) The individual seen here with the deformed face and diminutive nose was likely caused by a tropical disease known as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symtoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasel septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring. (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) The piece seen here likely displays the disease noted above, rather than a battle injury, or a ritualistic mutilation, but whatever the case, this interesting piece is an extremely rare Moche vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381605
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is a Chancay canteen type vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 9 inches wide, by 4.5 inches thick through the main body of the vessel. This piece is a scarce "black-on-red" Chancay canteen vessel, as the majority of Chancay vessels are "black-on-cream" type vessels, and tend to be rather thin walled. The piece offered here is very durable, as it has thick walls, although it was a mold-made type vessel. This piece has attractive black geometric patterns seen on a red background on both sides of the vessel, and a raised rounded spout at the top, that also has the face and head of a god built into the spout. The face of the god appears to have tattoos, and has a very prominent nose. The handles of the vessel also double as arms, and there appears to be black painted hands seen at the top of each handle where it meets the spout. The god seen here may depict a Chancay "water-god", as this culture existed in a very arid region in ancient Peru. This intact piece is also in superb condition, with no repair and/or restoration, and has vibrant colors. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note this piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Greek bronze coin is a Tarsos (AE 26mm), and dates circa 164-27 B.C. This coin is approximately 27 mm wide, weighs 16.3 gms, and is in very fine/good very fine condition (VF/VF+). This coin is also scarce regardless of grade, and overall, this coin is a better example than what is usually seen, and in addition, this coin has a beautiful even dark green patina. The obverse (Obv.) features a seated Tyche on a chair facing right, holding a grain ear, and below, the river god Kydnos is swimming right. The reverse (Rev.) features Zeus Nikephoros seated on a throne facing left, and is holding a Nike with a magistrates legend seen below the extended arm. The Greek legend (TARSOS) is also seen behind the detailed throne. The design of the seated Zeus and throne also copies the earlier coins of Alexander the Great, and the seated Tyche seen on the obverse is also a scarce depiction in ancient Greek coinage. Tyche was the patron goddess of Tarsos, and was easily recognized in antiquity as such, and this is also an explanation why this coin has no obverse legend. A nice Greek bronze with a beautiful dark green patina. References: Sear 5674; SNG Levante 979. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367222
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This exceptional piece is an X-large Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th century B.C. This beautiful extremely large piece is approximately 16.75 inches high, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the upper shoulder. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and this is also rare for a large-scale vessel such as this, as they are normally broken at the neck. The elongated neck seen on this beautiful piece gracefully extends upward, and this section of the vessel has an attached handle with an open flat-lipped spout. There is also a very small hole in the body, seen centered below where the handle attaches to the main body of the vessel, and this was added in order to speed and control the flow of liquid from the vessel, due to it's large size and the small opening through the elongated neck. It's quite possible that this small hole was added during a funeral ceremony in antiquity, as vessels of this type were used to pour votive libations. This piece also has a great deal of original white-ground material that was applied to the main body of the vessel, and in addition, there are spotty black mineral deposits mixed with this material, and these deposits are also seen on various sections of the vessel. The main body of this attractive piece also gradually tapers down in diameter, from the upper shoulder to the bottom round ring base, and this gives this piece a very elegant shape. This piece also has a flat bottom and this vessel stands very solid as well. Greek Attic white-ground lekythos of this type were used primarily for funeral rites, and often had fine-line figural design over the white-ground surface. These vessels were often placed in the tomb as a votive offering, and were often brought to the tomb as votive offerings by the family of the deceased. The fact that the small hole was added to the vessel is also a good indication that this piece was actually used in a funeral rite, and was then left as a votive offering. The vessel offered here is much larger than what is normally seen, and is rare not only for it's size, but also for it's intact condition. This Greek Attic ceramic also has a high degree of eye appeal, and is extremely graceful on display. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1320798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This superb Mayan "orange glazed" bowl with a glyph band dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 5.25 inches high by 7.75 inches in diameter. This piece is intact, and has some heavy root marking, along with some white calcite and spotty minute dark black mineral deposits. This attractive piece has a flat bottom, and has a graceful rounded body which gradually narrows towards the rim. This piece has a bright "orange glaze" with a red and black band seen just below the rim. Below this decorative red and black banded design, a black painted glyph band is seen running around the vessel that consists of fourteen identical glyphs. The detailed glyph band was also painted from right to left, and the beginning and end of the glyph band is seen, as the last glyph painted does not have the added "speech scrolls". The "speech scrolls" were not added to the last painted glyph, because the artist ran out of room within the overall composition, and could not over paint into the first painted glyph. This repeating glyph is also analogous to the glyph seen in "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Books Inc., New York, 2002, p. 146, Fig. 8-11. (See attached photo.) The glyph seen on the vessel offered here, along with the published glyph noted above, both have "speech scrolls" attached at the left side of the rounded main body of the glyph, and these "speech scrolls" represent a "quotative particle" in Mayan iconography, meaning as the term "quotative" indicates, certain particles (glyphs) attribute phrases to individuals as though these were the figure's utterances or actual speech. In the case of the glyph seen here, it is interpreted as "it is his saying", which may also be interpreted as "this vessel belongs to him". It is interesting to note that this glyph repeats again, and again, around the vessel within the glyph band, and in this case, the presence of this glyph tells us that this object belongs to someone. This type of possessive reference is a well-known reference seen in dedicatory Mayan ceramic texts. The piece offered here is as attractive, as it is interesting, and this type of Mayan ceramic is scarce on the market today. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385957
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This pleasing piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C., and is approximately .75 inches high. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, who was a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsman. This piece had a suspension hoop at the backside, and was worn as a "protector" type amulet. The piece offered here has a thick dark green glaze, and has a detailed face with a serene smile. Ptah is also seen wearing a skull cap, although he appears to be bald. This superb conditioned bust is complete, save for the missing left ear, and has a realistic and better facial expression that most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1184568
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb vessel is a Moche fineline ceramic that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This vibrant piece is approximately 12.2 inches high by 6.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with bright dark red and cream colors. This complete piece has no repair/restoration, some attractive light brown burnishing with some minute spotty light brown mineral deposits. There is a small probe hole seen near the base on one side which is also commonly seen on many authentic Moche ceramics. This piece also has a flat bottom and two lively running serpent warriors facing left, which are carrying shields/maces in an extended arm, and are seen with a bended extended leg. The fineline painting, along with the "wave motifs" seen on the raised stirrup, are painted in a vibrant dark red slip. This piece is one of only a few recorded examples that was likely painted by the same hand of a singular master painter, and is very analogous to the example seen in the Sackler collection. (See "Art of the Andes: Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections", Arthur M. Sackler Foundation Pub., Washington, D.C., p. 181, no. 58. See attached photo.) These serpent warrior examples are also thought to have been found in one geographic location, i.e Chimbote in the Santa Valley, and this theory also supports the premise that this piece was painted by an individual master painter. (This theory is also mentioned by Paul Clifford in the Sackler reference noted above.) The Sackler example and the superb example offered here, both show a coiled serpent body which conveys movement, a lively open mouth, dotted eye, and dark red trefoil body spots. This serpent warrior anthropomorphic composition conveys not only movement, but also a lively expression, which in combination makes this piece a master Moche composition. The anthropomorphic running serpent warriors composition also is a representation seen within the Moche spirit world, and may represnt the resurrection of a Moche warrior. This piece is a rare to scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 3821027., dated Nov. 27th, 1982, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1404824
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,875.00
This extremely rare Greek bronze dates to the Geometric Period, circa late 8th-7th century B.C., and is approximately 3.9 inches high. This piece is a votive bronze warrior, and was likely offered to a shrine such as Dodona or Delphi. In addition, this type is known as a "ithyphallic type" figurine, as this figurine displays a large phallus, and is a symbol of strength and fertility, along with the cult of Dionysus. This piece also has a bent lower right leg, and was intentionally bent so that the spirit of the warrior would not spiritually leave the shrine. This piece also has a single belt seen around the waist, has incised facial details, and outstretched stubby arms. The head also has an angular jaw and large almond eyes that are artistic hallmarks of the Greek "Geometric Period". This piece has a beautiful light blue patina with dark brown/green highlights, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also very analogous, and nearly identical to an example found at the Greek sacred shrine of Dodona, and is now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, Greece, no. 4905. (For a view of this piece, see the attached photo from the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, and at Wikimedia: https://commons.wikimedia.org). The piece offered here is about the same size as the piece noted above, and both pieces were cast as a single piece. The piece noted above also has three belt rings seen around the waist, and the piece offered here has a single belt ring. This belt ring may also signify the rank of the warrior, and these warriors are completely nude save for these waist belt rings. There is also a strong possibility that the Museum of Ioannina piece noted above, and the piece offered here, were both made at the same workshop. This piece is also analogous to a larger Greek Bronze Warrior that was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2014, no. 7 ($40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $43,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) The extremely rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market, as there are only a handful of recorded examples, and the majority of bronze figurines of this design are Italic in origin and date circa 625-600 B.C. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1960's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323858
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Greek/Gnathian baby feeder and strainer. This piece dates to the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high by 6.25 inches long. This piece is also in superb condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. There are also some spotty white calcite deposits mostly seen on the inner surface and bottom of the vessel, and some attractive root marking. This piece has an applied strap handle on one side of the main body of the vessel, in addition to a closed ended extension that has an open top. This extension allowed one to carefully pour the contents of the vessel into another vessel. The extension also slopes slightly upwards, which also allowed for an even flow with a great deal of control. There are several small holes in the main body of the vessel which acted as a strainer for a liquid that ran from the main body of the vessel into the open topped extension. This piece with this type of extension is commonly known as a "baby feeder", as this type of extension is often seen designed with Roman glass vessels with this description, but this piece was more likely used to filter a liquid such as olive oil. This interesting piece is rare, if not unique, and is a type that I have not seen on the market. This piece also represents the last phase of Apulian ceramic production in southern Italy, as it is a blend with the Gnathian culture. This attractive vessel also has a nice even black lustrous glaze on the outer and inner surfaces of this vessel, and a delicate white painted "vine and ivy leaf" tendril design that is seen running around the lower rim which has incised stems, white leaves, and berries. (For an Apulian/Gnathian ceramic with this analogous ivy vine design see "The Art of South Italy, Vases From Magna Graecia" by Margaret Mayo and Kenneth Hamma, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Pub., 1982, no. 137.) An extremely rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Gunther Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1119679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare ancient Greek coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted by Seleukos I, circa 305-290 B.C., weighs approximately 15.8 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/Good Very Fine condition (EF/VF+). Seleukos I was a general under Alexander the Great, and established his capital in Babylon circa 305 B.C. Seleukos was subsequently able to recover the Asian possessions of Alexander by winning military victories over some of the other former generals of Alexander the Great. The obverse of the rare coin offered here has the head of Herakles facing right, seen wearing a lion's skin head dress; and the reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle. The name of Seleukos is seen behind the seated Zeus, and before, is the forepart of a horse and an anchor symbol which are both mint marks of Seluekos I. This coin was minted in Ecbatana, which was the summer residence of the Persian kings, and is modern day Hamadan in western Iran. This coin was classified in "Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton", by Arthur Houghton, American Numismatic Society, New York, 1983, as being from the Ecbatana mint and minted within the same series as nos. 1128 & 1129, Pl. 67. The coin type seen here is a continuation of the "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage of Alexander the Great which had been inaugurated during his lifetime, and Seleukos I simply substituted his name from that of Alexander, and added his mint mark symbols. One added difference is that the head of Herakles seen on the obverse, may be a deified portrait of Alexander who died in Babylon circa 323 B.C., as the eye clearly is designed in an upturned manner, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of portraiture that is intended to show a deified god. In addition, the obverse shows a slight fleshy lump above the nose and lower forehead which Alexander was thought to have developed in the latter stages of his life. The choice of Seleukos continuing the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type of coinage, also tied Seleukos I closer to Alexander, and helped to legitimize his rule in Asia. This coin is a rare type, as classified in the "Celebrated Collection of Coins formed by the late Richard C. Lockett, Greek, Part IV, Glendining & Co., London, 1961, no. 2548, Pl. XV. This coin is very different than the bulk of the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage, because rather than portraying Herakles on the obverse, this coin type portrays not only Herakles, but also Alexander the Great as a god. There are very few obverse dies that show Herakles with the upturned eye as well, and this was a development in ancient Greek Hellenistic coinage that is seen only after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C. Ex: Spink & Son, London, circa 1960's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: