Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre AD 1000 item #661705
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This superb red sandstone fragment is from central India and dates to the Post-Gupta period, circa 8th-9th Century A.D. This piece is approximately 16 inches high and is mounted on a custom metal stand. This piece may originally have been part of a stele and/or a temple. There is a section on the right side of this piece that is flat, and this side may have been the inner part of a doorway. There are also four smiling Nagas seen on this piece with intertwined serpent tails and cobra hoods above their heads. Their raised clasped hands are seen in the Anjali Mudra position, and they are positioned at an angle so that they view the person that would pass through the doorway. There is also an elaborate foliage pattern seen on the edge, and the overall design of this piece is very esoteric. There is an analogous piece that is seen in the Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Ullman Collection and is published in "Art of the Indian Subcontinent From Los Angeles Collections", Ward Ritchie Press, 1968. This piece may be a part of the same building and/or stele, as this piece also forms part of a door jam. This piece, and the piece offered here, are both extremely fine examples of ancient Indian art and are in superb condition with clear detailed carving. These carvings are highly spiritual, and were intended to protect the viewer, as this was the reason for the depiction of the Nagas. A nice heavy piece with a high degree of spiritual feeling. Ex: Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art", March, 1990. Ex: Private Los Angeles collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is superb to mint quality "as found" condition, save for some minor glaze loss on one outer section of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1274546
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Scythian gold rosette plaque that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches in diameter, by .2 inches high at the raised center, and is a large example for the type. This gold rosette has a dotted border, with eight round floral pedal designs that run around the central element of the piece. This central element is a green glass inlay that is supported by a raised gold band. There is also an additional dotted decorative band the runs around the central glass inlay. This piece was also hand punched into a mold, thus forming the raised designs that are seen on the front side of this striking piece. There is also a minute centering central dot seen on the back side, which is a Greek convention of art during the 4th century B.C. This complete and intact piece also has some black mineral deposits where this piece likely attached to a garment that may have been votive. There are also minute black and dark brown spotty mineral deposits, along with minute root marks that are seen in various sections of the piece. This piece is also not thin gold sheeting, and is solid with some tensile strength, and this is an indication that this is not solely a votive type piece, and may have been worn on special occasions as well. This piece is a floral design with the raised central green glass element, and the green glass likely represents the center of a flower. This piece is also likely from the Black Sea region, and is analogous to gold plaques that have been found there that have floral designs. (See attached photo of an analogous Greco-Scythian floral rosette that was found near ancient Kerch, south of the Sea of Azov. This piece is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. This piece was published in "The Splendor of Scythian Art" by M.I. Artamonov, New York, 1969, no. 149.) These floral designs can be explained by the Greek Eleusinian cult that flourished in the Black Sea region, and the worship of Demeter and Persephone which represented the "change of the seasons" and "birth and rebirth", and these concepts were also associated with the growth of flowers and agriculture. The scarce to rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market and has great eye appeal, as this piece has a brilliant color. This piece can also be worn today, as it is a durable solid example, and it can easily be built into a pendant or necklace. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide rim seen on this vessel allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid, and served as a palette for the liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is has a Lambayeque Valley, Peru, type of design, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has silver with added copper metal plate. This piece also has a thin applied coat of original spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1404947
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This intact piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.2 inches high. This piece has an attractive dark green patina, and some spotty light mineral deposits. This piece was cast as one solid piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods are seen wearing the winged cap known as a "petasus". The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. The figurine seen here is also seen holding a money bag in his extended right hand, and this was to offer the owner of this piece fortune in commerce. This piece also has a square built-in base, and this piece stands by itself. The piece offered here is very simple in design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's also very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a temple or shrine. This piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in the ancient Near East. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece may also have been a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1353070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This piece is a Roman silver denarius minted circa late 168- early 169 A.D., Rome mint, and is a rare to scarce issue, as it is the last issue minted by the Rome mint in the name of Lucius Verus. This coin is very fine/about very fine (VF/VF-), is 2.5g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin shows the image of Lucius Verus facing right, wearing an olive wreath, and around is the legend L VERVS AVG-ARM PARTH MAX. The reverse shows a draped and seated Aequitas-Moneta facing left, holding scales in her right hand to the front, and behind is a cornucopia, and around is the legend TRPVIIIIMDV-COSIII. Lucius Verus was joint emperor with Marcus Aurelius, circa 161-169 A.D., and the coin offered here was likely minted in the period shortly before or during the death of Verus early in 169 A.D.; and according to the BMC reference (British Museum Catalog), this coin was minted as the last issue of Lucius Verus by the Rome mint. Both emperors at this point in time were outside of Rome, and were beginning to be engaged in a bitter campaign in Germania in securing the empire. In the prior six years, both emperors were engaged in a protracted war in Parthia and Armenia, and as a consequence, by 169 A.D., the imperial treasury was severely drained of funds. In addition, a serious plaque brought back from the east swept through the legions and the general population, which reduced taxes and revenues to the empire. The coinage also became slightly debased, from an average of circa 3.0-3.2 grams, circa 161-169 A.D., to about 3.0 grams for a silver denarius, circa 169-170 A.D. (See D.R. Walker, "The Metrology of the Roman Silver Coinage III", 1978, p. 125.) The coin offered here is rare to scarce due to the reasons noted above, and is among the rarest issues of Lucius Verus produced by the Rome mint, as this issue was minted over a short period of time, and there was a severe lack of metal from which to mint coinage. This may also explain why this coin also appears to be a "fourree", meaning it is an ancient coin with a base metal core and a precious metal exterior. The coin offered here appears to have a core that is a debased silver, and may contain a high concentration of tin and/or lead. One can see sections primarily on the obverse of this coin that show minute cracks where the outer layer is peeling away from the inner core, and in addition, sections of the edge of the flan under high magnification show a thin outer layer for both sides of the coin. It may be that Marcus Aurelius himself ordered the Rome mint to produce a coin of this type for the impending campaign in Germania, but what is known for certain is that this coin is a high quality "fourree", and was likely intentionally and officially produced by the Rome mint, and if this was the case, this was an extremely rare circumstance in the history of Roman coinage. A coin of extreme historical interest, and one of the best recorded examples. References: BMC 481-2, RIC 595, Sear 1544. Ex: Harlan Berk Ltd., Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1054243
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting Moche vessel is in the form of a skeletal head, and it dates circa 200-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece is mold made from a light brown terracotta, and there are spotty dark black and brown dotted deposits. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as the eyes and mouth are framed with shrunken skin not unlike a death skull. There is some academics that think this type of Moche portraiture displays an ancestor from the underworld, or it may portray a sacrifical victim that is seen with his skin ceremoniously flayed back away from the face. Whatever the case may be, there are many Moche vessels that portray a skeletal figurine, and there is likely a spiritual and/or underworld connection to this genre of Moche art. This piece has a flat bottom and is also designed with an upward tilt, in order that the face looks upward at the viewer. This piece is truly a powerful Moche image, and may also represent a "transformation" piece that may be a bridge between the living and the underworld. Ex: Andrea Sarmiento collection, Miami, FL. Ex: Erika Roman estate, Santa Cruz, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1345828
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This interesting and attractive Mayan cylinder vessel dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.4 inches in diameter at the top rim of the vessel, and is a large vessel for the type. This superb piece is also a "Copador" type designed vessel, and refers to the geographic region where the majority of most of these vessels are found, with the "Cop" referring to Copan, and the "ador", referring to El Salvador. This large example also has very large glyph bands that are seen in the upper third of the vessel, and at the bottom half of the vessel. The upper glyph band has four large black painted identical glyphs, along with a square black painted glyph that denotes the beginning and end of the band. The lower glyph band has two identical red painted glyphs that are seen stacked on one another, and this glyph design is repeated as three identical separate groups that run around the vessel. The identical glyphs seen in the lower band, are also nearly identical to the black painted glyphs seen in the upper band. The two glyph bands are also separated by a black and red line, and are both framed by a red line and red band seen both on the upper rim and base of the vessel. The design of the glyph seen within the "red band", which is also the main glyph sign of the glyph seen within the "black band", resembles the Mayan glyph for "Chak", meaning "red", or "great". The Mayan color "red" also is the color of the rising sun, and signifies and corresponds to the direction "east". It's interesting to note that the predominant Mayan glyph seen on the center of this vessel is rendered in the color red, not orange, or black. (For the glyph and it's meaning, see: "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Pub., New York, 2002, pp. 230-231. See the attached photo of the glyph meaning "red" that is seen on p. 231.) In most cases, glyphs seen on Mayan "Copador" type vessels are usually pseudo-glyphs, and have no meaning, and were created as decorative symbols. The orange, black, and red colors seen on this vessel are also commonly seen on "Copador" type vessels. If the glyphs seen on this vessel are not pseudo-glyphs, then this type of vessel is an extremely rare type of Mayan ceramic. There are also known "Copador" type vessels that have a combination of glyphs that are designed as having a meaning, along with glyphs that are pseudo-glyphs, and it may be that this is the case relative to the superb vessel offered here. This piece also has rather thick side walls, and the vessel has a slight flare as seen from the top to the bottom of the vessel. There are several attractive minute root marks, and some minute black spotty minerial deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. This intact piece also is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and is now scarce on the market in this superb condition with the vibrant orange, black, and red colors. Ex: Private New Mexico collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, Dec. 2010, no. 292. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402930
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This extremely rare piece is a Mycenaean/Minoan bronze goddess figurine that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1100 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high, by .68 inches wide at the fluted base, and is a normal size relative to the known recorded examples. This attractive figurine has a tubular shape, and was cast as one piece. The body is also hollow, and there is an opening seen at the top, along with a "v-shaped" opening at the front of the body. This opening is where the neck/head was attached, and this was likely made from a perishable material such as wood or bone. There are also incised lines seen just below the raised arms at the shoulder area, and this decorative "linear line design" is also seen on many examples of early Greek art from the Late Bronze Age, circa 1300 B.C., down to the Geometric Period, circa 750 B.C. These extremely rare bronze figurines may have been a grave offering, and/or could have been an offering that depicted significant rituals that were associated with rites of passage that involved the departed. The figurine offered here could also have been part of a group of several figures of this type, that together, could have portrayed a ritual as noted above. This theory was developed by Daniela Lefevre-Novaro, and her theory was supported by the figural terracotta models that were found in the Minoan Kamilari burial complex in Kamilari, Crete. (See "Coming of Age in Ancient Greece", by Jenifer Neils and John Oakley, Yale University Press, 2003, pp. 40-43.) The arms of the figurine offered here are also seen extended into the air, and this is an ancient Greek sign of "blessing" and "mourning" death, and this posture is depicted on ancient Greek art from as early as the Late Bronze Age, circa 13th century B.C. The type of figurine offered here is also thought to have originated in Crete, and has also been identified as being a "mother goddess" connected to fertility. (See "Ancient Cyprus" by Vassos Karageorghis, 1981, p. 125.) In summary, this extremely rare piece is likely a goddess figurine that represented several of the aspects noted above, and was either a votive grave offering, or an offering in a shrine. This esoteric bronze goddess figurine is intact, has no repair and/or restoration, and easily stands by itself. This piece also has a beautiful light brown to dark green patina with some dark blue/green highlights, and some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402388
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) grade, and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This mint quality piece is approximately 33 mm wide, and weighs 16.9 gms. This piece is well centered on the reverse, and is slightly off center on the obverse, and features on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a spectacular very muscular and nude standing Herakles, and is one of the best examples for the type. The reverse die of this coin is one of the best for the entire series, and this coin was struck with a fresh reverse punch die, and a worn obverse anvil die. This coin was also likely struck shortly before a fresh obverse die was added, and there are also very few coins of this type with this very desirable reverse die showing a detailed and very muscular Herakles. It's also very likely that the coin offered here is the finest recorded representation of a very muscular and nude standing Herakles for the Greek Thasos series. The hair of Herakles is very detailed with a dotted design, and the minute facial details are clearly defined as well. There is also Greek lettering to the right that reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This piece has great artistic style for the period, and there are few recorded reverses with this reverse die that features a more muscular and detailed Herakles as the example offered here. An exceptional coin with some traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. References: Sear 1759 var. BMC 74 var. SNG Cop 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: