Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1407136
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
These two matching East Greek kylix cups date circa mid 6th century B.C., and are approximately 3.1 inches high, by 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle. These two kylix drinking cups are intact, save for some some minor scrapes, minute chips, and surface scuffs. These pieces also have some attractive root marking, seen mostly on the inner surface, and some spotty black mineral deposits. The inner surfaces also have a thick black glaze, and the main body of these pieces have a raised fluted base. These pieces are very esoteric in design, and are derived from "Attic Little Master" cups. These pieces are also classified as being "East Greek" types, and have been classified as being produced in Rhodes and several East Greek cities such as Ephesos. (See "Excavations at Tocra, 1963-1965, The Archaic Deposits I" by John Boardman and John Hayes, Thames and Hudson, pp. 111-116, no. 1219. See attached illustration.) The two pieces offered here are also nearly identical in form, and were certainly produced in the same workshop as well. These two pieces are excellent examples for the type, and have much of their original glaze. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1407189
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce piece is a scarce Chimu/Inka seated priest and dates circa 1000-1400 A.D., and is approximately 8.2 inches high. This piece is intact, and has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits. This seated priest ceramic has an orange/red slip that covers the entire vessel, and he is seen wearing a raised conical hat, along with a cape that is tied under the chin. The figure seen here with almond shaped eyes, and the typical conical hat, is also often associated with Chimu/Inka ceramics and wooden marker posts. This charming figure is seen with a slight smile, and appears to be offering a huge shell for a sacred ceremony. This huge cream-colored shell also appears to be a "spondylus" type shell, and was sacred to both the Chimu and Inka cultures. This cream colored shell also stands out against the orange/red slip of the priest, and highlights the importance of this shell. The shell depicted here likely represents a "spondylus limbatus" species, which also can exceed 25 cm in width. These sacred shells were often placed in burials, and in fields to ensure rain for the crops. In addition, these shells were used for regal jewelry, and only Chimu/Inka priests and shamans were allowed to handle them. This piece also has a flat bottom, and has a "stirrup" type handle that is seen at the back. There is also what appears to be a small corn ear seen on the back of the handle as well, and this ties in to the spondylus shell's role with the promotion of rain for the crops. A very interesting piece that displays a very serene Chimu/Inka figure that is seldom portrayed with Chimu/Inka art. Ex: Private West Virginia collection, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1407413
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience offering cup with the cartouche of Merenptah dates to the New Kingdom Period, circa 1213-1203 B.C., and is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 1.7 inches in diameter at the rim. This example is in flawless mint quality condition, and has an attractive light blue/green faience glaze, both on the inside and outside surfaces. There are also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and the faience glaze is rather even over the entire piece. In addition, there is a black glazed cartouche of the pharaoh Merenptah, and above, a hieroglyphic inscription meaning "Lord of the Lands". On the inside of this large offering cup, there are the preserved remnants of a calcified light brown material that is in the bottom half inch of the cup. This esoteric piece also has a gracefully designed flared upper lip, and a matching flared bottom base ring. The bottom of this piece is flat, and this piece easily stands upright. There is also an old inventory number "7B", seen inscribed on the flat bottom as well. The pharaoh Merenptah was the son of Ramses II, and was 60 years of age at his accession in about 1213 B.C. He was known for defeating a large force of invaders known as the "Sea Peoples", who are thought to have destroyed much of the Mycenaean palaces and cities. Egypt was one of the few great civilizations that survived through those turbulent times, and Merenptah, and his father Ramses II, are credited with saving Egypt. The rare offering cup offered here is an excellent example from the period, and clearly displays the name of the pharaoh. (Offering cups attributed to the pharaoh Merenptah are rare, and one of the few examples was offered by Royal-Athena Galleries, "Art of the Ancient World", 2015, no. 225. Approximately 1.6 inches high. $6,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: Anthony Drexel collection, Philadelphia, circa 1895-1970's. Ex: Dr. Bensen Harer Jr. collection, Seattle, circa 1970's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1409852
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This mint quality Roman glass plate dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 9.5 inches in diameter by 1.85 inches high. This exceptional example is in mint quality condition, and has no cracks, chips, or any other surface markings. This attractive piece is a light green glass with a beautiful patina, and has a brilliant golden patina with multi-colored iridescent highlights. This piece also has an applied double base ring, and is a rare feature, as most Roman glass plates of this type have a single base ring. This feature was also added in order to give this exceptional glass plate added stability, and allowed this vessel to hold items that had some added weight such as a full plate of fruit. (For another analogous Roman glass plate of this type and size with the typical single base ring see: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2010, no. 63. $3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $3,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is seldom seen with the double base ring, along with it's mint quality condition, and as such is a rare example. For the type see: "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, p. 120, no. 468. Ex: Private CA. collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1970's. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's-1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1409968
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare Greco-Roman bronze depicts Alexander the Great's war horse Bucephalus, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This lively piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 2.75 inches high, and is a rare type that is designed with a square base plate. This piece easily stands by itself, and has a beautiful emerald dark green patina. This piece has a very lively designed head that is seen slightly tilted to the left, along with a slight turn of the neck to the left as well. In combination, this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is also seldom depicted in subsequent Roman works of art. In addition, the mouth is slightly open, and the body appears to be prancing, as the left front leg is raised, but Bucephalus also appears to be depicted with no motion, and the horse's musculature and facial features indicate the end of "a tremendous exertion". This horse also has a main that is parted at the crest of the neck, and appears to have been cut. This is also an additional Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is also seen on the marble horse fragments now seen in the British Museum that are thought to have been attributed to the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, circa 353-350 B.C. (See "Fourth-Century Styles in Greek Sculpture" by Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway, University of Wisconsin Press, 1997, pp. 111-130, pl. 29. See attached photo.) It may be that the piece offered here was possibly modeled after these fragments and the building noted above. Bucephalus is also seen wearing a regal lion's skin, and the head of the lion is seen draped over the front of the chest. There is also a raised chevron seen between the ears that also resembles a raised horn, and this is also a regal symbol. Bucephalus meaning "ox-head", was reported to have been a massive creature with a large head, and was described as having a black coat and a large white star on his brow. He was thought to have been in the major battles of Issus and Guagamela, and finally succumbed to injuries after the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 B.C., and is thought to have been buried in Jalalpur Sharif, Punjab, Pakistan. This piece is completely intact, save for an old repair to the tail, and has some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. The lively and rare piece offered here was likely owned by a wealthy individual who may have been in a horse related business, or the military. The "Cult of Bucephalus" was also very strong down into the Roman period, especially in the eastern Roman provinces. The piece offered here with these Greek Hellenistic conventions of art is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example. This piece also has a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1410476
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This intact and superb faience Egyptian shabti dates to the Late Period, 26th Dynasty, circa 664-525 B.C., and is approximately 6.9 inches high. This esoteric green glazed shabti is intact, and has no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a very esoteric face with a slight smile and detailed molded body features. This piece is a mummiform standing figure with a tripartite wig, with a seed bag slung over his left shoulder, and is seen holding a pick and a hoe. This piece also stands upright by itself, as it has a flat bottom, and a dorsal pillar is seen on the backside. This piece also has a thick even green glaze, and there are also attractive spotty light brown mineral deposits seen on various sections of this piece. Overall, a very attractive and large example for the type. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Major James Findlay collection, Aberdeen, Scotland, circa 1950's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including UK Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1410594
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce Egyptian terracotta lion head bust dates to the Ptolemaic Period, circa 323-30 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide from ear to ear. This piece has a very serene expression, and is a scarce type, as most depictions of Egyptian felines are small cats that are usually depicted in bronze. The feline seen here is likely a young lion, as there are long fur details seen running along the lower jaw, and large eyes centered above a thick snout. This piece may have been part of a larger figure that had a wooden body, and was from a composite type piece. This piece is a light tan terracotta, and has exceptional incised details within the ears, nose, and eyes. This piece is intact, save for some stress cracks and minor stabilization fill at the back. This piece is also solidly mounted on a pin within a custom wooden display stand. A very esoteric Egyptian piece that has a great deal of eye appeal. (Another scarce Egyptian terracotta of this type is seen in the British Museum, acc. no. 2011.5009.288. This piece is also thought to represent Bastet.) Ex: Desmond Morris collection, Oxford, UK, circa 1970's-1990's. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 2000's. (Note: EU Export and US Customs Import documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1410791
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This exceptional vessel is a Greek bronze phiale that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 6.4 inches in diameter, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is in mint condition with no repair and/or restoration, and has a beautiful and thick dark green patina, with dark brown and blue highlights. In addition, there are sections of this vessel's surface that has a gold gilt, and this gold gilt is seen mostly on the inner surface of this vessel. There is also a small round hole seen near the rim on one side, and this allowed one to suspend this piece with a leather cord. On the inside center, there are three hand beaten concentric circles, and these circles frame a raised circular roundel known as a "omphalos". In the ancient Greek mind this also represented the center of the world, and the ancient Greeks viewed the sacred site of Delphi in a similar context. This "omphalos" also served as a finger grip, as this vessel was used in religious ceremonies for the pouring of libations such as wine. The sacred design elements seen within this type of vessel also make this vessel the Greek libation vessel "par excellence". This type of vessel was also made from gold and silver, and often served as a temple or grave offering. (For the type, see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", Methuen & Company Ltd. Pub., London, 1966, pp.74-83.) The exceptional bronze vessel offered here is also much better than most examples, as it is in mint condition with beautiful surfaces. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1411615
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This scarce and complete piece is an Atlantic Watershed volcanic stone joined couple that dates to Period V-VI, circa 800-1200 A.D. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, by 5 inches wide, by 1.75 inches thick, and is a complete example with no apparent restoration and/or repair. The Atlantic Watershed classification is commonly used for carved volcanic pieces of this type that are from Central America, principally Costa Rica. This piece was carved from a volcanic stone, and has exceptional details for the type, as one can clearly see the hair braids, facial features, and body molding. The standing woman is seen holding a trophy head under her right arm, and the man is seen holding an unknown object under his left arm. Both figures are nude, and likely represent a regal couple that is displaying their power and virility. Atlantic Watershed figurines of this type are also usually seen as a single individual, and are rarely depicted as a joined couple. This piece also has some minute light brown/black mineral deposits, and some slight wear in various sections of the piece. This piece also has a high degree of eye appeal and sits on a custom display stand. (For the type see: "Between Continents/Between Seas: Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica", Abrams Pub., New York, 1981.) Ex: Westermann collection, Germany, circa 1960's-2000's. (Note: EU Export and US Customs Import documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: