Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374471
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb Roman bronze is an applique that shows a facing Diana that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches high, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece is a facing Diana, who was the Roman goddess of the hunt, and is seen with a bow quiver over her shoulder, along with a chiton and animal skin cloak that is draped over her left shoulder. She is also seen with a raised hair tie that holds her hair at the top of her head with intricate folds. This attractive bust of Diana displays a very serene face, and has eyes that were likely inlaid with silver. There is also a crescent moon pattern seen at the bottom outer edge of the bust, and this alludes to this goddess, as she was the Roman goddess of the hunt, nature, and the lunar cycle. This piece has an even light green patina with some spotty red highlights, along with some spotty light gray calcite deposits. This piece also was likely a decorative element that may have fit on a furniture piece or box. (For the type se Babelon-Blanchet, "Catalogue des Bronzes Antiques de la Bibliotheque Nationale", Paris, 1895, nos. 140 and 176; and another analogous example is seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 1985, no. 312.) This piece sits on a custom marble and Plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1278878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern red steatite kohl vessel, that dates circa 2nd-3rd Millenium B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a complete intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This interesting piece is rectangular shaped, and is in the shape of a tower. There is a circular opening seen at the top, along with four raised corners, and there is a hollow core that runs down into the center of the vessel. This vessel is also decorated with notches and bow-drilled "recessed concentric circle" designs on all four sides. There are also nine (9) "recessed concentric circle" designs seen on each side, and some of these "recessed concentric circle" designs are more deeply drilled than others. This vessel, besides being a very attractive architectural type piece, is a "kohl vessel" which contained compacted material (grayish-black or white powder). The grayish-black material was known as "kohl", which was used to protect and heal the eyes in a desert and/or an arid enviroment. The white powder, which is sometimes found in this type of vessel, was used to coat the face and served as a sun block. There are also remains of a grayish-black "kohl" material found in the vessel offered here as well. This vessel was also usually fitted with a bronze stick that served to remove and apply the product. This piece also has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections of this piece, and has some attractive deep black colored veins that run throughout this hard red steatite stone. This type of vessel was widespread in the ancient Near East and Mesopotamia, as well as the Iranian plateau, Margiana, and Greek Bactria. However, the red steatite material seen with this vessel is scarce to rare, and was highly prized in antiquity, and there are very few recorded examples of this type made from this beautiful dark red stone. This piece is an attractive scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12955. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1182861
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This piece is a Greek bronze finger ring that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7.5, and likely was made for a young man or woman. This piece has a flat face, with a beveled back face, and an attached ring hoop. This intact piece is very solid, is in superb to mint condition, and can easily be worn today. The back beveled face also allows this piece to easily slip on and off the finger. There is some slight wear to the back face, and this is a good indication that this piece was worn by a living person, and simply was not solely a votive object. This piece has sharp engraving, and the engraved composition has detailed deep relief. This piece shows a flying Nike facing left, and a seated draped woman below who may represent Ledo. The flying Nike was the Greek god of victory, and this example has wings above and is holding a victory wreath in front. The Nike is in the act of crowning the victor with the wreath, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on Hellenistic coinage and objects. The seated woman who may represent Leto, made love to Zeus, and she bore him the great archer-deities Apollo and his sister Artemis. The combination of these two symbols seen on this ring is very powerful, and likely offered the wearer "victory in life". This attractive ring may have been used used a personal signet seal ring as well, as it makes a sharp impression. (See the attached photos showing the ring impression that was done in soft clay.) This ring has a nice dark green patina with some minute dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is a superb example for the type, and is a scarce example. (For the type, see J. Spier, "Ancient Gems and Finger Rings", Malibu, 1992, no. 85.) A custom black velvet ring stand is included. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239527
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Salinar/Viru culture monkey "transformation" type vessel that dates circa 400-200 B.C. This piece is approximately 9 inches long by 7 inches high, and is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece is a standing quadruped with a stylized lobed monkey's head, and a short tail is seen curled at the back. This piece is seen standing on sturdy legs, with each flank painted with mythical creatures that have bared fangs and claws. The whole piece is covered with a light yellow-brown slip, and the mythical creatures and facial elements are painted in a light reddish-orange color. This piece is also a "stirrup-handle" type piece that is also designed as a "whistle" type vessel, as it makes a shrill sound when one blows into the raised end of the handle, and as such, this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel. In addition, this piece also represents a "transformation" type vessel, as the stylized lobed head on the monkey has human and animal features. This rare early Andean culture ceramic may also be a prototype for the subsequent Moche I ceramics, and as such, this type of piece set the standard for Andean ceramics that have a great deal of realism regarding both human and animal representations. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a superb to mint quality example for the type that is seldom seen on the market. Another analogous example of this culture is seen in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 49. (See attached photo. The Lempertz example also has an analogous painted mythical creature on the flanks as the piece offered here, and both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop.) This type of piece is x-rare to rare, and has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1986. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available for the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 01/14/1991, no. 369012, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385336
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Colima water carrier figurine that dates to the Proto-classic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 13.25 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a nice even deep red glaze over the entire outer surface, save the bottoms of the flat feet. This piece also stands solidly by itself, and the water carrier seen here has a large jar on his back that has detailed ropes and fittings which are not normally seen on scarce pieces of this type. This water carrier also has his hands behind his head in order to steady his heavy load, and he also has a serene expression which runs counter to one that has a heavy load on his back. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, and the surfaces show little wear. An exceptional example seldom seen on the market. Ex: Sotheby's pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 387. ($5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $9,000.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. Published: Featured in the ATADA Online Show, Aug. 9-19 2018 (www.atada.org/online-show). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #809739
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb ceramic is from the Moche culture that dwelled in northern Peru and dates circa 50-200 A.D. This piece is classified as being Moche I period, circa 50-200 A.D., due to the design of the stirrup spout that has a thick lip. The Moche ceramics from this period often have a cream colored glaze with red highlights, as this vessel also displays. This intact piece is approximately 8 inches high and is in superb condition, with no over paint, repair, and/or restoration. There is also a small pebble inside this ceramic, and this vessel may have served as a ceremonial rattle. This cute piece has a vibrant red line-designed lizard seen on both sides, and there are red dots that surround each lizard. These red dots represent seeds of the acacia tree, which are closely related to the hallucinogenic anadenanthera colubrina, which are believed to have powerful medicinal properties. The lizards that are native to the desert scrub brush land of northern Peru subsist exclusively on these seeds, and its thought the Moche consumed these lizards believing that they would derive the benefits of the acacia seeds. (For the ceramic type see "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, 1978, page 142.) The lizard was also a creature worthy of depiction, as lizards shed their skins, and this trait makes them symbolic of regeneration. This piece is an interesting work of Moche line-designed art that is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private CA. collection. Ex: Arte Textil, San Francisco, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1246377
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C. This appealing and large scale piece is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, and is mint quality with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a dark brown glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this piece has two lines seen on the body above the raised footed base, and has a dark brown line pattern seen on the upper flat rim. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown glaze seen on the majority of these large scale pieces is mostly worn away. The reason for this, is that the dark brown glaze is very thin, and was applied simply as a "wash type" glaze over the light tan clay before it was fired in the kiln. However, the attractive dark brown glaze, seen on the exceptional piece offered here, is mostly intact. This type of "Messapian" piece is also much rarer than the more common Greek "Apulian" and "Lucanian" column-krater types, and according to A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18: "The shapes used for South Italian vases in the fifth century were largely derived from Attic models (see Glossary of Shapes); later, some local forms were introduced, amoung which the most characteristic are the nestoris or trozzella (in Lucanian, e.g., cat. nos. 4, 10, and 11, and Apulian, e.g., cat. no. 134), which seems to have been of native, probably Messapian origin, and the bail-amphora (in Campanian e.g., cat. no. 90, where it goes back to the black-figure prototypes of the sixth century). Many shapes are common to all fabrics (e.g., bell-and calyx-kraters, lekanides, hydriai, lebetes gamikoi, oinochoai, skyphoi); for others there were decided local preferences. Thus the loutrophoros and phiale (dish) are confined to Apulia; the volute-krater, column-krater, Panathenaic amphora, pelike, kantharos, and rhyton are rarely found outside of Apulia and Lucania; the neck amphora, bottle, and skyphoid pyxis are common only in the western fabrics." The piece offered here is also likely votive, and this also explains it's mint quality condition. The bottom is also closed, and this vessel may have held a votive offering such as grain for use in the afterlife. This piece has some heavy white calcite deposits and some minute root marking, as this attractive column-krater is in mint "as found" condition. This piece is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy near and around ancient Taranto on the Adriatic coast. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery in southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1144158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Aphrodite that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, and is a complete and intact example. This piece also has several earthen deposits, and is in its intact "as found" condition. This light tan terracotta figure is a nude Aphrodite, who is seen raising her right arm and holding her drapery behind, and her lower right arm is seen holding or resting on an extended dolphin, with its head pointing downwards. This dolphin may also represent a piece of dolphin-designed furniture. The dolphin seen at her side also refers to the ancient Greek myth of the birth of Aphrodite, as she sprang from the foam of the sea. She is also seen on a rectangular stand, and there is a small round vent hole seen on the back side. This attractive piece was mold made from two seperate halves, and is a typical example of a Greek Boeotian terracotta, but this piece has a totally nude highly erotic pose which is not often seen . This type also is found during the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C., and is sometimes classified as being "Roman", but the example seen here is an early Greek example. Another analogous Greek example, dating circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., of the same size and molding is seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2006, no. 114. ( 500-700 Pound estimates, 840 Pound/$1,512.00 realized.) This piece also stands by itself, and sits on a custom black plexiglas and wooden stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is a thick walled example, and is also a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are in fact, an added plus towards the value of the piece. This attractive piece has an exceptional dark green patina with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is very desirable, due to the reasons noted above, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze, and was hammered into shape and the form we see today. This piece was finished with detailed repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "Classical Period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian Empire) deep bowls. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great, who subsequently paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece also comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980.s. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1331598
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive brownware ceramic is a Mayan carved bowl that dates circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 9.75 inches in diameter, by 3.7 inches high. This powerful looking piece has a flat bottom with gently curved side walls, and this design made it very easy for catching liquids. This piece has detailed deep carving, within three rectangular panels, and this skilled carving is in the form of a head commonly known as a "Long-Lipped Monster", and was described as such in the Sotheby's reference noted below. This type of Mayan image is rare, although it is a known image relative to Mayan iconography. This rare image is designed in glyph form, and is comprised of a scroll eye, upturned snout, bared fangs, smoke scrolls curling at the back, and sections of crosshatched elements. Each of the three rectangular panels are also separated by two smooth petalled-shaped motifs, and the entire bowl thus has a floral-like appearance. The "Long-Lipped Monster" image depicted here may also represent what is known in Mayan iconography as a "Square-Nosed Serpent" image. According to Andrea Stone and Marc Zender in "Reading Maya Art, A Hieroglyphic Guide to Ancient Maya Painting and Sculpture", Thames and Hudson, London, 2011, p. 227: "This logograph combines ophidian and floral elements in the form of a band that makes several 90-degree turns, suggesting the upturned snout of a sinuous serpent. Eye and nose rest atop the band and beneath are several curly fangs and no lower jaw. This 'square' or 'fret-nosed serpent' is a prominent, albeit esoteric, feature of Maya art. It seems to embody a radiant life force, expelled through the mouth, nose, or center of a flower, and dispersed throughout the universe, much like mana in Polynesia." This logograph is also associated with Mayan ceremonial bloodletting, and it is also quite possible that the Mayan bowl offered here was a part of this ceremony, and this bowl is in essence, a Mayan ceremonial offering bowl. This vessel also has a light yellow/brown polychrome slip seen both over the inner and outer surfaces, and each of the three rectangular panels have traces of white stucco and red cinnabar that are seen down within the low relief areas of the deep carvings. The carvings seen within each of the three rectangular panels are nearly identical, and were each carved individually, such was the skill of the artist. In addition, the inner surface has a black band seen at the rim and a black circle applied to the inner flat base, and resembles a target for ceremonial bloodletting into the vessel. It's also interesting to note that the color red also contrasts with black, and is easily seen. There is also some attractive and extensive root marking and dark black/brown burnishing seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and there are also some spotty minute dark black mineral deposits which are normally seen on authentic vessels of this type. This piece is also 100% original, and was repaired from three large fragments. This limited repair also appears to have been done some time ago. The interior of the bowl is smooth, and also has a thin polychrome glaze on both the inner and outer surfaces. Overall, this piece is a fine example of a carved Mayan vessel, and the detailed and deep carving also gives this piece powerful eye appeal. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1995, no. 170. ($2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: