Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1022403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is an Olmecoid standing figurine that dates circa 600-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, is a light tan clay, and has a thin light tan to clear polychrome glaze. This piece is intact, and has a solid body and a mold made hollow head, which was attached in antiquity. This figure is seen with both arms at the side, and the hands are positioned at the front holding a paunchy stomach, which indicates that this piece is a fertility and/or mother goddess. In addition, the lower torso is "pear" shaped and has wide hips. This piece also has many classic Olmec artistic style features such as the jaguar-like ears, eyes, and mouth. These features are a combination of human and animal, which are classified as "transformation art", which is a principle stylistic hallmark of Olmec art from central Mexico. This type of Middle Preclassic period fertility figurine has been found in Izapa (Mexico), Kaminaljuyu (Guatemala), and Chalchuapa (El Salvador); and has also been classified as the "Mamom" artistic style, which was produced by a "pre-Mayan" and/or Mayan culture. (For the "Mamom" artistic style, see "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Harry Abrams, Inc. Pub., New York, 1985, pp. 74-75.) This piece is scarce in this intact condition, as most pieces of this type are found broken, and is a much better example than what is normally seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself. This piece comes with a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Julio Atalah collection, circa 1940-1967. Ex: Danny Hall collection, Houston, TX., circa 1967-2005. Ex: Saida Cebero collection, Sugarland, TX., circa 2005-2009. Ex: Private Florida collection. I certify that this pice is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1262216
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a complete Greek bronze mitra piece that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.1 inches high by 7.25 inches wide, is intact with no repair/restoration, and is complete save for a small missing tip of one side. This piece was designed to be suspended from a belt, and likely hung below the rim of a bronze bell corselet. The shape of this piece also suggests that it protected the stomach and lower abdomen, and perhaps each side of the hips as well, with more than one piece attached to a leather belt. There are two holes seen at each end of the central stem which likely held rings that attached to the leather belt. This method of attachment allowed this piece to freely move at the bottom, and allowed the warrior ease of movement as this piece was able to move with the body. According to Herbert Hoffmann in "Early Cretan Armorers", Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 9-10: "The Cretan mitra was designed to be suspended from a belt and to hang below the rim of the bell corselet. The total absence from the find of anything that might be identified as part of a metal belt suggests that the mitrai were worn from a belt of perishable material. Most examples are semicircular sheets of bronze 5 to 7.5mm thick, varying in height from 12.5 to 18 cms. and in breadth from 21.5 to 29.5 cms. The edges of their wide flat rims are sometimes rolled over a bronze wire, the straight upper edge being rolled outward and the edge of the crescent inward. Three holes are punched in the sheet metal near the top edge, one at the center and one at each end, to accommodate rings from which the mitra was suspended. The function of these bronze plates as stomach protectors was recognized by Furtwangler when he published the first examples discovered at Olympia. F. Poulsen gave them the Homeric name 'mitra' in his publication of the specimen from Rethymnon, and the term has had archaeological respectability ever since (although what sort of body armor Homer meant is highly debatable). In endeavoring to define the role played by mitrai in Greek combat we must take into account their geographical distribution. This form of armor is to date documented only from Crete, Thrace, and Etruria - three regions of the ancient world noted for their archers. It seems likely that mitrai were meant to protect their wearers against arrows, i.e. that they were worn by hoplites frequently exposed to archery attack." (An example published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, pl. 40, no. 3, is slightly larger than the example offered here, has three suspension rings, and has a half crescent shape. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has a slightly different design than the known examples published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, and the design of this piece may point to Cyprus, and if this is the case, the piece offered here may be one of the earliest examples of it's type, and pre-dates the published Hoffmann examples that date circa mid to late 7th century B.C. The inside of the exceptional piece offered here also likely had a leather liner, and/or had a thick leather pad which attached to the additional perimeter holes seen on this piece. This piece also has fine workmanship, as there are raised punched round knobs that are seen running around the perimeter of the piece. These knobs, besides being very decorative, also add strength to the overall piece. This piece has a beautiful light green patina with some heavy dark green and blue mineralization, along with some white calcite deposits, and the patina and mineral deposits are also heavier on the backside of this piece. Greek armor from this early period is extremely rare, and even fragments from this period are seldom seen on the market. This piece is attached to a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1326070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,865.00
This nice Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, by 5.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This rare piece has a dark gray patina with dark brown highlights, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from five separate parts: the main hand beaten body of the piece, two cast handles, a ring base, and a round base tubular extension. The main body of the piece also has an attractive volute pattern that runs around the main body of the vessel, and several hand punched dots that are seen running around the base of the rim. This piece is intact, and has some limited repair, with only the secure reattachment of the handles and footed base which appears to have been done some time ago. There are three short and visual stress cracks that are seen running down from the upper rim into the main body of the piece that are about .3 inches, but other than that, this piece is a superb example that is intact, and is a solid example. These cracks were likely the result of ground pressure, and also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The overall design of this esoteric Greek vessel is rare, especially with the volute pattern and the "flat handles" that are normally seen on subsequent Roman period vessels. A silver vessel kantharos cup seen in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", by D.E. Strong, London, 1966, p. 114, dating from the second century B.C., has analogous "flat handles" as the vessel offered here, and is described as having two "long horizontal thumb grips". This piece featured by D.E. Strong is now seen in the National Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and is also described as being a "Greek vessel with elaborate ornament". The Greek vessel offered here may also be among the first vessels of this type with a "flat handle" design, and was the Greek prototype for the subsequent Roman period silver kantharos type cups that had this analogous "flat handle" design. The piece offered here not only is a rare example that has an esoteric design, but it also has superb eye appeal and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1359591
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This exceptional piece is a Greek silver fibula that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2 inches long, by 1.6 inches wide. This piece also has a beautiful light gray patina, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece is a solid example, and was made in sections, and was also detailed with an acanthus design seen at one terminal end. The other terminal end has two raised knobs with a hoop between, and this raised hoop likely held a leather tie so that this fibula would not have been lost by the wearer. This piece was expensive in antiquity, and was worn only by a wealthy individual. This piece also displays five "paddle wheel" decorative elements, and each of these decorative elements have six raised knobs. The overall design of this attractive piece is very intricate, which also lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This type of piece was also used in place of a button to fasten the sleeves of the Greek chiton. (For the type and use see: "Greek Jewellery, 6,000 Years of Tradition", 1997, Athens, no. 78.) Another near identical example is also seen in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Inventory no. 52.36. The exceptional piece offered here is one of the finest recorded examples, and is complete, save for the missing ultra-thin attachment pin. This piece is also attached to a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1345828
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This interesting and attractive Mayan cylinder vessel dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.4 inches in diameter at the top rim of the vessel. This superb piece is also a "Copador" type designed vessel, and refers to the geographic region where the majority of most of these vessels are found, with the "Cop" referring to Copan, and the "ador", referring to El Salvador. This large example also has very large glyph bands that are seen in the upper third of the vessel, and at the bottom half of the vessel. The upper glyph band has four large black painted identical glyphs, along with a square black painted glyph that denotes the beginning and end of the band. The lower glyph band has two identical red painted glyphs that are seen stacked on one another, and this glyph design is repeated as three identical separate groups that run around the vessel. The identical glyphs seen in the lower band, are also nearly identical to the black painted glyphs seen in the upper band. The two glyph bands are also separated by a black and red line, and are both framed by a red line and red band seen both on the upper rim and base of the vessel. The design of the glyph seen within the "red band", which is also the main glyph sign of the glyph seen within the "black band", resembles the Mayan glyph for "Chak", meaning "red", or "great". The Mayan color "red" also is the color of the rising sun, and signifies and corresponds to the direction "east". It's interesting to note that the predominant Mayan glyph seen on the center of this vessel is rendered in the color red, not orange, or black. (For the glyph and it's meaning, see: "How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs" by John Montgomery, Hippocrene Pub., New York, 2002, pp. 230-231. See the attached photo of the glyph meaning "red" that is seen on p. 231.) In most cases, glyphs seen on Mayan "Copador" type vessels are usually pseudo-glyphs, and have no meaning, and were created as decorative symbols. The orange, black, and red colors seen on this vessel are also commonly seen on "Copador" type vessels. If the glyphs seen on this vessel are not pseudo-glyphs, then this type of vessel is an extremely rare type of Mayan ceramic. There are also known "Copador" type vessels that have a combination of glyphs that are designed as having a meaning, along with glyphs that are pseudo-glyphs, and it may be that this is the case relative to the superb vessel offered here. This piece also has rather thick side walls, and the vessel has a slight flare as seen from the top to the bottom of the vessel. There are several attractive minute root marks, and some minute black spotty minerial deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also appears to be intact, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and is now scarce on the market in this superb condition with the vibrant orange, black, and red colors. Ex: Private New Mexico collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, Dec. 2010, no. 292. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354113
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb piece is a Greek Illyrian type helmet that dates circa mid 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 12 inches high, from the tip of the cheek pieces to the top of the crest box, and is a full size helmet. This piece has been classified in "Antike Helm", Lipperheide and Antikenmuseums Collections, Mainz, Germany, 1988, pp. 59-64, as being "Type III, A". This superb example has attractive elongated cheek pieces, a detailed minute punched decorative dot band that runs around the outer perimeter edge, and a distinctive heavy raised crest box. The punched decorative dot band, seen running around the outer perimeter edge of this helmet, also has added gold gilt that is a rare, and not often seen, decorative feature. This decorative gold gilt perimeter band is also known to cover the "heavy-rivet, Type II" Illyrian types, and this is an extremely rare feature for this type as well. There is also a "V-type" design seen at the junction where the cheek pieces meet the main body of the helmet, and all of the features noted above are inherent to the "Type III, A" classification. The heavy crest box seen on this helmet is seen primarily on this helmet type, and is a further invention in ancient Greek armor, as this protected the warrior with extra protection from over head striking blows. This beautiful piece also has some minute nicks and scrapes from weapon blows that indicate that this helmet has been in battle. The condition of this piece is extremely fine to superb, with some closed crack lines which is normal for a helmet of this type, and has thin added reinforcement on the upper inside inner crown that was done circa 1980's. This piece is also approximately 90-95% original, and was repaired from several large fragments in the crown area, with the balance of this beautiful example being intact. The patina is also exceptional, as there are dark and light green colors with beautiful dark brown and red highlights, along with some spotty dark green and blue mineralization. This piece was also constructed from one sheet of bronze and was hammered into shape, and the construction of the heavy crest box was highly specialized, and took a great deal of skill to produce. This helmet also falls within the last group of Illyrian helmets to be produced, and this also explains the additional features that are seen on this rare to scarce piece, and these features are not seen on the earlier and more common "Type II" examples. This piece also has an attractive and compact design, and is one of the best examples for the type. An analogous comparable was sold by Christie's Antiquities, "The Art of Warfare: The Axel Guttmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 2002, no. 52. ($19,000.00-$28,000.00 estimates, $19,000.00 realized.) The later and more scarce "Type III" examples, as the piece offered here, are now also selling for a premium over the more numerous "Type II" examples, as the "Type III" examples were produced with a higher degree of workmanship and skill, and this is now becoming more well known in the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, not only because it is a "Type III" type, but it also has a rare gold gilt decorative dot band. This piece also comes with a custom metal stand. Ex: Lord McAlpine of West Green collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private U.K. collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, and this group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328068
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This attractive Greek bronze is a complete relief plaque that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches long, by 3.25 inches high, by 1.3 inches thick which is also an extremely high relief. This piece shows a striding panther that is walking left, and is seen looking back at it's handler which is a nude walking Eros. The nude walking Eros is also seen pulling a rope that is secured around the neck of the panther, and the walking Eros also has wings that are seen behind his back. The panther is seen with his head facing the viewer, and the body of the Eros is twisted with an open chest towards the viewer as well. The entire scene is framed by a Greek acanthus pattern at the top, and scrolls to the left and right. This plaque likely was an applique that was attached to a bronze hydria or a bronze vessel of some type, and is a scarce example. The panther was sacred to Dionysus, and the Eros may be a representative of Dionysus as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece also hangs from a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Published: Royal-Athena Galleries: "Gods and Mortals", 1989, no. 13. ($3,750.00 fixed price.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363891
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This scarce piece is a Greek silver cup that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.9 inches high, by 4.65 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This beautiful piece has a flat bottom, and easily stands by itself. This attractive piece also has a slightly flared rim, and graduates in size down to the flat base, and overall, this piece has a very esoteric shape and a high degree of eye appeal. This vessel also has a light to dark gray patina with some attractive spotty light gray mineral deposits. These attractive mineral deposits are not only a mark of authenticity, but they also show that this piece has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. There is also some minute root marking and scratches, which is normal for a vessel of this type, and there is no repair/restoration. This piece may also have been produced in ancient Thrace, and may also have been produced for the Scythian market. For the type see: D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 84-86. The piece offered here is scarce to rare, and overall, is a superb example seldom seen in this condition on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239527
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Salinar/Viru culture monkey "transformation" type vessel that dates circa 400-200 B.C. This piece is approximately 9 inches long by 7 inches high, and is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece is a standing quadruped with a stylized lobed monkey's head, and a short tail is seen curled at the back. This piece is seen standing on sturdy legs, with each flank painted with mythical creatures that have bared fangs and claws. The whole piece is covered with a light yellow-brown slip, and the mythical creatures and facial elements are painted in a light reddish-orange color. This piece is also a "stirrup-handle" type piece that is also designed as a "whistle" type vessel, as it makes a shrill sound when one blows into the raised end of the handle, and as such, this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel. In addition, this piece also represents a "transformation" type vessel, as the stylized lobed head on the monkey has human and animal features. This rare early Andean culture ceramic may also be a prototype for the subsequent Moche I ceramics, and as such, this type of piece set the standard for Andean ceramics that have a great deal of realism regarding both human and animal representations. This piece also has some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a superb example for the type that is seldom seen on the market. Another analogous example of this culture is seen in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 49. (See attached photo. The Lempertz example also has an analogous painted mythical creature on the flanks as the piece offered here, and both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop.) This type of piece is x-rare to rare, and has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1986. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available for the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 01/14/1991, no. 369012.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357105
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with hemispherical shields are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These lovely pieces are approximately .68 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the hemispherical shields are approximately .25 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 1.6 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The hemispherical shields have a smooth facing surface, and have a great deal of eye appeal because of their simplicity of design. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. These pieces are a nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and have a pleasing eye appeal. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, no. 43. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1250013
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This extremely rare and cute piece is a Moche blackware feline that dates Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This early Moche piece is approximately 8.25 inches long by 7.2 inches high. This black glossy glazed piece is intact, and has some attractive light brown burnishing and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This cute piece is a reclined feline that is seen with his long-tailed prey in his mouth, and this prey appears to be a small mammal and/or mouse. This feline's powerful bared teeth are seen holding it's prey securely in place, and this feline also appears to be relaxed, as he is seen reclined with his lower torso to one side along with his wavy tail. This feline is also seen with forward-curving ears, graceful incised whiskers, rectangular nose, and a compact body. There is also a stirrup-spout at the top of the body, and male attributes are seen between the hind legs. This type of Moche ceramic normally does not have prey in his mouth, and as such, is an extremely rare type. Another analogous blackware reclined feline piece, without the prey, is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 14. (See attached photo. $1,200.00-$1,800.00 estimates, $1,210.00 realized.) The feline offered here may be a rare black jaguar, or a smaller feline such as a puma. Wild felines held a special place in the mythology of the ancient Americas. The felines special night vision combined with their powers as hunters were often likened to the power of shamans who would incorporate feline elements into their costumes or paraphernalia. The piece seen here also has enlarged eyes, which emphasize this creature's excellent night vision, and the face of this feline has anthropomorphic characteristics. This type of piece is extremely rare, as it is a type that has the caught prey, is in superb condition, and has great eye appeal. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358083
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This brilliant colored piece is an Aztec/Mixtec pedestal bowl that dates circa 1300-1421 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.25 inches high, by 7.2 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece is also classified as being of the "Mixteca-Puebla Style", and is also labeled as "Eastern Nahua". This piece is glazed on the inner bowl and the outer surfaces, except for the underneath section of the raised base which is a light tan terracotta. This attractive piece has a brilliant dark red glaze with dark black design features that are very sharp in detail. These design features include a "spiral and stair-step" pattern that is seen in a band running below the upper rim, and this motif may also be a "Wind Serpent" symbol. (For this "Wind Serpent" symbol see "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Aztec and Maya", by Charles Phillips, Lorenz Books, pp. 208-209.) This "Wind Serpent" symbol also ties in with the fact that the piece offered here may have been used for religious ceremonial use in drinking the alcoholic drink "pulque", which was made from the maguey cactus. The Mixtec and Aztec creation myth of "pulque" involved the serpent god Quetzalcoatl, who gave the stimulating fermented drink "pulque" to the people, which would quicken their spirits for dancing and joyful celebrations. The thick red glazing seen on the inner bowl also suits this piece very well for this purpose. This intact piece also has some spotty heavy dark black mineral deposits seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is some minute light root marking. Another analogous vessel of this type is seen in the Cleveland Art Museum, no. 1962.249. (A plate with the analogous and vibrant black and red "spiral and stair-step" pattern is also seen in Bonhams, "African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art", New York, Nov. 2014, no. 85. $2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Overall, a scarce and attractive vessel that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is in a mint "as found" condition, although there is some glaze loss seen mostly on the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1357220
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This detailed and interesting piece is a late Roman/Byzantine bronze bracelet that dates circa 4th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches in diameter, by 1.2 inches high. The opening on the back side is approximately .9 inches wide, and the terminal ends have rounded edges. This beautiful piece is also intact, and has no repair and/or restoration. This piece has six engraved box designs, and within each box is a "stylized floral" pattern that is also a conventional art design for the period. The "stylized floral" patterns are often seen in other art pieces for the period, and were sometimes used to portray the "holy cross" with "four pointed rays". There is one box in the center of the piece that has "four pointed rays", while the others have six to eight. This symbol was used in the same context as the holy "fish" symbol, which was used to signal and mark one's faith. This piece also has a beautiful light to dark green patina, and has some spotty light blue and red highlights. The engraving is very fine and detailed, and is a superb example for the period. This piece does not flex, although the metal is relatively thin, and really should not be worn today. This piece sits on a custom metal stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: